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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Just wondering if it would shorten the break in period or be beneficial to sand the slick stuff off before I get it installed? Or is sanding a bad thing?

Thanks,
 

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I believe it does, I sand every new tire I install just to get rid of the slick surface. It doesn't take much. A few years ago I had a rear tire puncture while 80 miles from home. The dealer mounted the tire which was purchased from him. I consider myself an experience rider with 30 plus years of riding and know that a new tire needs to be carefully scrubbed in, but this one time I forgot. One block from the dealer, first left turn, and down I went. My Royal Star skidded away from me in the middle of the intersection. Up that time, I only wondered if I would be able to lift the bike if it fell on it's side. I found out I could.
Sand that tire.
 

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I note that you're in WA where the road surfaces are probably cold this time of year. Cold roads plus slick tires aren't a good combination. So knocking the slick stuff off the tire is probably a good idea as you won't scrub them much out riding on cold roads as opposed to warm roads during the summer. Personally, I wouldn't use sand paper, I'd use a brillo pad or steel wool and comet cleanser or such (the stuff we used to clean white walls with - remember them? lol) with lots of water. Then I'd still take it easy for the first few corners. Good luck.
 

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cosmic_chariot said:
Just hold the front brake and do a burn out.. it makes fast work of scrubbing a tire...

cosmic
Not such a good idea on a GL1800 with linked brakes.

prs
 

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I sand mine the natural way, on the road. I take it easy in the corners for the first 50 miles or so, but then again, I'm a woosy ride all the time.
 

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Pigeon Roost said:
Not such a good idea on a GL1800 with linked brakes.

prs
Actually it will work. The rear brake is actuated by the left front caliper pivoting due to forward movement. If the bike isn't moving forward, the rear won't be actuated.

Put your bike on the center stand. Start it and put it in first gear. Try to stop the rear wheel with your hand brake lever. It can't be done.
 
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It isn't just the mold release goo your attempting to remove for the first few miles. Riding helps to seat the tire on the rim bead as well...
I think , maybe, kinda, sorta. :)
 

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NO, Paul didnt fall. When I was helping him yesterday he said he sanded down his new tire to scuff it up a little.
 

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Toyo said:
NO, Paul didnt fall. When I was helping him yesterday he said he sanded down his new tire to scuff it up a little.
I certainly hope you have pictures of this!! :shock:
 

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Rastoff said:
Pigeon Roost said:
Not such a good idea on a GL1800 with linked brakes.

prs
Actually it will work. The rear brake is actuated by the left front caliper pivoting due to forward movement. If the bike isn't moving forward, the rear won't be actuated. ....
True, but only if the right front caliper/rotor by itself is enough to prevent ANY forward movement of the bike during the burnout. Just a little forward movement and the left caliper/rotor WILL actuate the secondary master cylinder on the left caliper and apply some rear brake.
 

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NO, Paul didnt fall. When I was helping him yesterday he said he sanded down his new tire to scuff it up a little
Yeah pictures
 

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I've been using those hard white sanding blocks that you can buy at the home centers. Works for me.
 
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