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When looking at posts about GPS I continually see the same GPS models mentioned.
Is there a reason why other less expensive automotive style GPS units are not used on motorcycles.
From some of the posts I have read It seem that a lot of you expect a lot of functions from your GPS units.
I would be interested in some basic functions to navigate from point " A to B" and points of interests along the way.

So why not the automotive style GPS units?
 

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Most are looking for a waterproof motorcycle GPS which narrows down your options pretty quickly (Garmin or TomTom). If you are willing to chance getting an automotive GPS wet then no problem or use Google Maps on your phone.

There are waterproof cases available for some automotive GPS and cell phones. Down side is these cases usually dim the display which in sunlight can be a problem while some diminish the touchscreen sensitivity.

I use the TomTom Rider 550 which is waterproof and reasonably priced compared to Garmin.
 

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Likely because they are designed for the interior mounting of the Automobile and are not exposed to the various weather scenarios we see riding the MC's. Also, most of the GPS software is catering to the motorcyclist desires from a dedicated GPS unit for a motorcyclist. JMHO
 

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So why not the automotive style GPS units?
I went through this analysis months ago, then bought a Garmin zūmo 396 LMT-S. On sale for $295.

Lots of accessories that are motorcycle-specific. Throttle/Clutch RAM balls, waterproof wiring setup, waterproof case, more durable. Couldn't be happier.

I have an automotive nuvi but it will stay in the Tundra.
 

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My '02 does not have NAVI, thank goodness.
I have a Garmin 2797 mounted between the hand grips, wired to the AUX audio input.
I much prefer being able to make function changes 'on the fly',
such as, "what's ahead" shows fuel, food, ATMs

knowing how far it is to the next gas pump can be very helpful at times when I am running flat out over a long distance, therefore trying to minimize stops for gas.... each stop costs me 15-20 minutes, so if I can get an extra 50 miles per tank, that can be very meaningful at end of day.

I have run down to 5.9 to 6.3 gallon fillups repeatedly on several long trips... knowing your fuel gauge, plus Trip Meter and calculating fuel remaining vs distance to next gas pump helps a lot.

I have always carried a 1 gallon Leak Proof jerry can in the right saddle bag. That allows me to practice this w/o worrying about having to walk. FWIW, I have never, ever, had to use that spare gallon of gas.
 

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My '02 does not have NAVI, thank goodness.
I have a Garmin 2797 mounted between the hand grips, wired to the AUX audio input.
I much prefer being able to make function changes 'on the fly',
such as, "what's ahead" shows fuel, food, ATMs

knowing how far it is to the next gas pump can be very helpful at times when I am running flat out over a long distance, therefore trying to minimize stops for gas.... each stop costs me 15-20 minutes, so if I can get an extra 50 miles per tank, that can be very meaningful at end of day.

I have run down to 5.9 to 6.3 gallon fillups repeatedly on several long trips... knowing your fuel gauge, plus Trip Meter and calculating fuel remaining vs distance to next gas pump helps a lot.

I have always carried a 1 gallon Leak Proof jerry can in the right saddle bag. That allows me to practice this w/o worrying about having to walk. FWIW, I have never, ever, had to use that spare gallon of gas.
Aaaaaaaaaaa the J/can of fuel is a very good idea....especially on a trike! Hmmmmmmmmmmm! Thanks for the idea :love:

Ronnie
 

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Never owned or used a motorcycle specific GPS. For some 10 plus years I have used Garmin automotive GPS units with no problems. I carry a couple of small zip-loc type bags in case of rain but rarely used since riding in rain is not something I normally do. I try to plan ahead for "weather" concerns. My GPS is currently mounted using a windscreen vent mount. The few times I have ridden in rain the little bit of rain it has experienced has not affected it. My '08 also has navigation built in and while the maps are about 12 years old it functions quite well as a "Go Home" device. I'd like to have a motorcycle specific unit but the exorbitant (to me) price makes carrying a zip-loc bag a no brainer. 😊😊😊
 

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We use a Garmin nuvi .over the past 6 years one time we got in a bad rain storm , we and everything else got soaked for a while i did'nt even have time for the plastic bag trick which i do always carry . When we finally found a place to get off the road i didnt take the garmin off, i was in too big of a hurry in get into the station to get out of the rain. Later when the rain stopped when we went back to the bike the garmin had no life nothing would happen so i thought it was done i through it in the saddlebag for the rest of that day. next morning i tried it and it worked just fine and has ever since. I like it because it is very simple to work. I'm not much of a tec guy.
 

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I used a Garmin Nuvi 1450 on my 02 wing for over 300,000 miles mostly trouble free. But I wanted to put an end to having to worry about covering it when it rained and I also wanted to try Adventurous routing so spent the big money for a Garmin Nuvi 595 , yes in my opinion it’s way overpriced, there are things I love about it as well as things I hate about it. Hopefully Garmin will be coming out with a new and vastly improved version of the Zumo soon, if they do I might buy one.
 

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the Garmin 2797 when mounted into the RAM mount is fairly immune to rain.
the only part that can get wet is the front panel.

when I stop for the day, I throw my jacket over the windscreen and GPS.

365081
 

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When looking at posts about GPS I continually see the same GPS models mentioned.
Is there a reason why other less expensive automotive style GPS units are not used on motorcycles.
From some of the posts I have read It seem that a lot of you expect a lot of functions from your GPS units.
I would be interested in some basic functions to navigate from point " A to B" and points of interests along the way.

So why not the automotive style GPS units?
I have used various Garmin GPS receivers that were waterproof and the last one was the Garmin 2720. That GPS is no longer supported by Garmin. So I went to the Garmin 1490 and 1450. I bought two 1490's new for under $150 each. Used units on Ebay are plentiful and inexpensive. I have bought nine of them I think. I mounted two of them on riding partners bikes. Now I have a stash of spares.

There is no real worry that the receivers will get wet and die an early death. They are very well made and water doesn't seem to hurt them. But, I did worry that they could drown so I looked for water resistant cases. I found several water resistant cases for sale on Ebay. Mounting them on the bike was easy and they work.
GPS Case.jpg

Water Resistant Case.jpg

Naturally, I don't use the handlebar mount on the Gold Wing. But the ball mount feature works well with the Garmin mounting system.
This GPS and mount I bought from Yoda. The mount works extremely well. The 2460 is no where near as good as a 1450 or 1490. But, the three of them are the same physical size and easy to work with. It's just that the 2460 fell short of my expectations. It is now a backup to the backups.
Garmin 2460 and GPS mount 1.jpg
 

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@AZgl1800's program with the nuvi 2797 is a good one. I have rolled that way for many miles. Finally fried a screen after 12 hrs in frog choking rain, but got a new screen from Hong Kong for $60 and back in business (though shipped via the slow boat from China).

Google "Greg Rice nuvi 2797" and there's info about hacking it for audio connections. Also YouTube GPSKevin has some tips in waterproofing the screen with silicon around the edge. Using clear packing tape also works.

CoverMates -- grocery store, food storage aisle -- are like little shower caps and cover up phone or GPS or such better than a baggie, but baggies work, too.

All of the above saves you a little $$ from hacks. The OS in zumos also tend to lag behind the car models. Something like the $500-$700 zumo 595 today is 4 or 5 OS generations behind the current automotive line (Drive has replaced nuvi). But some of the mc-specific features have value. zumo 396 seems a fair compromise today for price, currency, and features. I wouldn't buy a 595 today.

Dive into the info here: https://www.newenglandriders.org/GPS/GPS.htm

Using a GPS to go from point A to B is fine. Mundane.

Using a GPS on a motorcycle to follow a complex route optimized for enjoying the ride is where you want to be. There's info there that will get you there.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Big_Bird
MUNDANE ???? Really? Mundane????? Ya probably! LOL
But your points are valid. I just don't want to spend $600 when less than half of that will work for me.
Good input from a lot of people and for that, Thanks!
Now I have to go back and reread the post and make sure I understand their content.
 

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Yup! Said it. Meant it. In fun. But for real.

Best way to save money for going simply from A to B direct is to use the navigator on the smartphone you already have. If off the net, use offline maps before you check off. Feed the phone into Aux or the Bluetooth you've already got.

Doing real navigation, i.e. following multi-point routes, to support a better ride is worth every penny that you'll spend on a GPS. Even the silly expensive ones. And can't be done on your phone.

BaseCamp sucks in many ways. But it's essential in many others and, when all is said and done, is the least bad way to access a world of geo-spatial mumbo jumbo that will transform the way you get out and wander.

The keys to all are in the NER link.
 

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I have tried many methods of creating a route for the Garmin GPS, and have found that all of them suffer a major problem.

How far is it to the next Overnight, and what if I want to deviate?

Over the years of using GPS units, I have fallen to using only one method.
Before the trip, I use Google Maps and find decent RON points, and I enter each of those points as a destination on the Garmin GPS, then I name that point by the name of the Town.

For me, this is the slickest thing I ever came up with. go to Recent and select the name of the WayPoint Town you want to go to today, or next.

.
 

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I've been looking at getting a new GPS, too. It's confusing and requires a lot of research and attention to fine details. Others mentioned route planning/programming on your computer then loading that to the GPS. That sounds worthwhile to me. Also Bluetooth linking to my helmet. I find my Honda GPS almost entirely worthless and would disable it if it was easy to do. Instead I just never display it. I've also wondered about getting a trucker GPS for the large screen.
 

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Greg Rice's 2797 hack is the best...been on (4) three flags with it... if you know how to solder... can't beat a 7" screen and audio in your ear...used to use TYRE for route planning...I see that TYRE has been changed to use Gooogle maps , but you gotta have a Credit card for the Gmaps "key" ( 0 cost) ...for planning a multi day route I like it best...


if you follow Greg's adventures...you'll see that he has traded up to a truckers version ( Dezl 550)


hth
 

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^ the Dezl he uses adds Bluetooth for headset profile. I looked at that when I fried my nuvi screen, but they're surprisingly expensive and I was already happy getting the GPS prompts over Aux to bike speakers.

For anyone seduced by Dezls, beware that all of them say "Bluetooth" but only some of them will do the headset profile you need to pair to your helmet gizmo. The rest of them only do phone profile and their speaker phone function is useless to you moving down the road. Does. Not. Work. Period. There are many flavors of Bluetooth, and that's the wrong one.

Similarly, the nuvia all say BT but only none of them do the headset profile. And not many of them (or of the newer DriveSmarts) have the nifty RAM case available that is key to being able to hack a good, fairly weather resistant mount.
 
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