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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So I came across this TPMS system but I do not have enough information on it yet.

Mu number one concern is a limitation in the sensor's upper range which appears to be capped at 50 PSI. Our tires go over 50 PSI when hot so am I missing something here?!!?






Very similar to SmarTire system I HOPE. I do NOT see where the pressure reading is a temperature adjusted reading like the SmarTire system is.



Orange’s aftermarket performance line – TPChecker – introduces internal TPMS for tubeless motorcycles! TPChecker’s motorcycle tire pressure monitoring system monitors tire pressure and temperature in real time, all the time. Notifying riders of any abnormal shifts in tire pressure or temperature levels on the spot, Orange TPMS keeps the driver informed and allows them to react instantly.


While motorcycle TPMS is not mandated (like passenger vehicles) for North American motorcycles, Orange Electronic provides a high quality, low cost alternative for those safety-conscious riders. The display unit shows real time pressure and temperature as long as the ignition is on. The pressure and temperature information will turn red and alert the rider if tire pressure or temperature shifts ±25% in an individual tire, helping to prevent blowouts and slow tire leaks while optimizing performance.






ATTN Mods: I tried to kill the links to buy it in fairness to our board sponsor. If I missed one, please feel free to take care of it. THANKS!
 

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I was looking at this the other day and thought the same thing!
 

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What kind of situation are you seeing your tires go above 50psi? I run 42psi in the rear and can't imagine a 8psi increase in a street riding scenario.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Many of us run 45 psi in the rear tire for 2-up with trailer.

The rear tire exceeds 120 degrees even with one-up riding.

My rear tire is around 157 degrees "normally" which is 87 degrees hotter than "cold" inflation temp thus my tire has an expected increase of almost 9 PSI over cold inflation.

45 + 9 = 54 which is 4 PSI over the capabilities of this device. Even with your 40 PSI that's pushing the system at 49 PSI to a point that is beyond a comfort zone for me.

MOST riders are clueless on the temps the tires run. My current TPMS system provides a temp compensated reading so I know if I am losing pressure or not even if the tires are "hot"


Hope that answers your question.
 

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What kind of situation are you seeing your tires go above 50psi? I run 42psi in the rear and can't imagine a 8psi increase in a street riding scenario.
My Stone G704 rear (only about 2k of mileage on the tire) with just me and my wife on board (together we weigh under 250lbs), riding at a very moderate 45mph along a little country road, outside temp was about 60F, the tire went from 41 to a high of 49 psi (as indicated on the Doran monitor) in about 30 minutes and stayed there until we got home.

Load the bike up and run on the interstate in summer temps and you'll easily see 50 psi and then some. :nojoke:
 

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Greetings!

It is worth contacting the manufacturer to find out if the 50psi is a "hard stop" limit (incapable of sensing any higher) or if the 50psi is the limit at which the plus/minus 1psi accuracy applies. If so, it may be able to read higher than 50psi but at a reduced accuracy.
 

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My number one concern is a limitation in the sensor's upper range which appears to be capped at 50 PSI.
check out the "new" (improved) TireGuard from ShowChrome
... goes up to 60psi.

the "old" version seemed to have a higher failure rate
but this new one is hanging in there for me.
.. and the caps are lighter than the old ones and do not leak air anymore.
.. all the "alarms" are user programable

I've had TPMS internal sensors and, for most, it's not "if" they'll get busted
during a tire change, it is "when".
Internal sensors don't make sense to me on something like
the Goldwing that "eats" tires so quickly.

The only negative I've noticed is the temp display is more like
"ambient" since the sensor is external.
(most would not even notice unless you're aware of the expected 1psi per 10 degree change)
It will show the pressure going up correctly when it gets hot
(I just came across Texas with it) but the temp display is lower
than should be possible for the pressure indicated.

But .. first thing in the morning, when everything is "cold",
then the temp and pressure "agree". That's the important
part to me anyway.



Dennis
 

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[The pressure and temperature information will turn red and alert the rider if tire pressure or temperature shifts ±25% in an individual tire, helping to prevent blowouts and slow tire leaks while optimizing performance.]

Also a 25% increase in temperature would not allow for the necessary limits for normal tire temperature increases. If you start out with a cold rear tire temperature of 60 degrees F will you get a warning signal when it hits 75 degrees? This system would not work well unless the owner was allowed to adjust and set the parameters that would dictate a warning signal being issued.:shrug:
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Also a 25% increase in temperature would not allow for the necessary limits for normal tire temperature increases. If you start out with a cold rear tire temperature of 60 degrees F will you get a warning signal when it hits 75 degrees? This system would not work well unless the owner was allowed to adjust and set the parameters that would dictate a warning signal being issued.:shrug:
No because a cold tire at 60 degrees is already showing a 1 PSI lower number. At 75 degrees you have only gained 1/2 a lb of PSI which is way below the 25% shift.

Tires should be checked at 70 degrees, thus if your tire reads 40PSI at 70 then it is expected to read 39PSI at 60. The TPMS is programmed to your tire pressure pref unlike the built in Honda TPMS which you can not program to a different set of Cold Inflation Numbers.

Anybody confused yet?
 

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What kind of situation are you seeing your tires go above 50psi? I run 42psi in the rear and can't imagine a 8psi increase in a street riding scenario.
My friend has a Doran TPMS and a couple weeks ago his was showing 41 lbs. in the rear tire before we left and the outside temp was in the high 90s. we rode about 90 miles at approximately 70 mph and his monitor had moved up to 52 lbs. We had our tires filled with Nitrogen and on the way back his pressure still got up to 47 psi. Check your rear tire pressure before riding and check it afer a long ride on a hot day and see the difference. And this was him riding single. His front tire never heats up as much as the rear tire so it keeps a slightly abore average psi
 

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No because a cold tire at 60 degrees is already showing a 1 PSI lower number. At 75 degrees you have only gained 1/2 a lb of PSI which is way below the 25% shift.

Tires should be checked at 70 degrees, thus if your tire reads 40PSI at 70 then it is expected to read 39PSI at 60. The TPMS is programmed to your tire pressure pref unlike the built in Honda TPMS which you can not program to a different set of Cold Inflation Numbers.

Anybody confused yet?
DJ the instructions stated that it would give a warning at a pressure or TEMPERATURE change of +/- 25%.

I know how it should work as I have run a TPMS for 2 1/2 years now with great results.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
And my information is at 70 per both Metzler and Avon.

I have spent quite a bit of time on the phone with Metzler and Avon trying to work out a good tire combination.

Keep in mind that I have 200,xxx miles on the wing since 07 so I have a few tires under my belt.

I can only go by what the maker of the tire says. I live in Florida so that temp just happens to work out well here.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
DJ the instructions stated that it would give a warning at a pressure or TEMPERATURE change of +/- 25%.

I know how it should work as I have run a TPMS for 2 1/2 years now with great results.
Can you illustrate when a 25% shift in temp would matter? Only time I can think of a shift like that would be from a hot day to suddenly in the rain which does happen quite frequently here in FL.

Just because you have run A TPMS doesn't mean you know anything about TPMS. Just means you know YOUR TPMS.

My current TPMS works much differently than yours unless you have a SmarTire system, which I doubt since they haven't been made for a long time and are very hard to find.

We're getting off-topic here. Please do not take the above as any kind of bashing at all. NOT sent that way.

I posted the info to get a better understand of what this unit is all about.
 

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I have a SmartTire system sitting in my garage. Unit and the front sensor still function, but the rear failed and there are no replacements at a reasonable cost. I now have a Doran system. I, too, would worry about a system which would send an alarm at 50PSI, as my rear tire often exceeds that pressure when it is hot and we are loaded. I had to adjust the alarm on the SmartTire up to 55 to keep the alarm from going off. Don't think the Doran alarms at increases, just decreases (but I might be wrong). I've often wondered why the SmartTire had an alarm for pressure increases. What was I supposed to do, get off and release pressure from the tire?
 

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Can you illustrate when a 25% shift in temp would matter? Only time I can think of a shift like that would be from a hot day to suddenly in the rain which does happen quite frequently here in FL.

Just because you have run A TPMS doesn't mean you know anything about TPMS. Just means you know YOUR TPMS.

My current TPMS works much differently than yours unless you have a SmarTire system, which I doubt since they haven't been made for a long time and are very hard to find.

We're getting off-topic here. Please do not take the above as any kind of bashing at all. NOT sent that way.

I posted the info to get a better understand of what this unit is all about.
If I start with a cold temperature in my rear tire of 70 degrees and if this system issues a warning when that temperature increases by 25% that would be at 87.5 degrees. A close riding associate who also runs the Smart Tire system regularly sees a temperature increase of greater than 25% in his rear tire. I am just saying that the owner would need to be able to set warning parameters for any TPMS system that is showing tire pressure and temperature to meet the riders needs. Why is the Smart Tire system no longer available?
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
ummm.....

To be fair, there are replacements available for your SmarTire system and the ethical thing would be to give you the info.

Or you could just sell me your system.;)

PM me for for info if you want to put your smartire back on the bike
 

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I know there are replacement sensors, but they cost almost as much as the entire system originally did. :eek:4: I love the Doran, wired to the battery for constant tire pressure monitoring, and sensor replacement at $25. There is no way to miss the red flashing alarm on the Doran system....DAMHIK. And all that for less than the cost of two new SmartTire sensors. PM me if you want the SmartTire system (whats left of it). :nojoke:
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
SmarTire was introduced long before the TPMS caught on so a lack of sales was the driving force. The company was sold to a competitor and then shut down.

Of course that is my understanding of their history but it's tough to research them.

The smart tire system is a temp compensated unit that warns of both pressure and temp gains and losses but the warnings only kick in above normal operation.

The unit knows the tire is within tolerances at 150 degrees. I can tell you at 186 to 187 the high temp warning is going off. Been there 3 times.
 

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DJ under normal riding conditions and ambient temperatures in the 70's what kind of temp range do you see in your front tire?
 
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