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Interesting perspective, but I have a question. Are you totally off throttle in the apex of the curves? I don’t have near the talent you do but I’m asking because I would like to get more confidence and smother in the twisties.

Larry
 

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WOW !! REVERSE IS REALLY FAST ON YELLOW BIKES :bow::bow::joke: DO YOU PAY THE POLICE TO BLOCK OFF ROAD SO NO TRAFFIC :shrug:;)
 

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WOW !! REVERSE IS REALLY FAST ON YELLOW BIKES :bow::bow::joke: DO YOU PAY THE POLICE TO BLOCK OFF ROAD SO NO TRAFFIC :shrug:;)

8am is all that is needed!!!!
 

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Interesting perspective, but I have a question. Are you totally off throttle in the apex of the curves? I don’t have near the talent you do but I’m asking because I would like to get more confidence and smother in the twisties.

Larry
Yellow Wolf may have a different opinion, but my answer is sort of.

You should be off throttle through the first half of the turn, cracked throttle at and through the apex and accelerate out of the corner. IF you are looking for speed through the corners. Normal cornering with a short apex this works perfect, however with a long apex like on the gap you need to realize you can't accelerate right at the apex.

On the gap ( I went last summer) those corners are not everyday corners and many of them are 120 degrees +. Some seem to be 180 degree turns. These are not turns where normal logic is used with cornering. You can see this with the countless people that come in hot, hit the apex, and go right across the road into the pucker. On a normal turn it would have worked fine, but on the gap, no so fine.

Not sure if I explained well enough?
 

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Yellow Wolf may have a different opinion, but my answer is sort of.

You should be off throttle through the first half of the turn, cracked throttle at and through the apex and accelerate out of the corner. IF you are looking for speed through the corners. Normal cornering with a short apex this works perfect, however with a long apex like on the gap you need to realize you can't accelerate right at the apex.

On the gap ( I went last summer) those corners are not everyday corners and many of them are 120 degrees +. Some seem to be 180 degree turns. These are not turns where normal logic is used with cornering. You can see this with the countless people that come in hot, hit the apex, and go right across the road into the pucker. On a normal turn it would have worked fine, but on the gap, no so fine.

Not sure if I explained well enough?
this is why I don't post how to ride posts,in person its easier and clearer to understand,no offence ment to anyone that does it well I just don't!
 

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this is why I don't post how to ride posts,in person its easier and clearer to understand,no offence ment to anyone that does it well I just don't!
Thanks to both of you. I wasn't trying to make waves just trying to get info. I can respect both opinions. And by the way Yellow wolf, keep the videos coming

To MarkEkberg, I appreciate your info also. I think it will help with the curves as well. When I took a MFS course many years ago they stressed you need to be the at the slowest speed entering the curve and then accelerate thru the curve.

I know there are better riders out there and I was just curious to see if I could get more confident if I tried it another way.

Thanks to both of you for your information

Larry
 

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I also took an MSF course along time ago, they told us to slow down before the curve and accelerate through the curve to set the suspension.

Good info, or bad info?
 

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Nice videos Rick. I love that time of the morning with the sun coming up and light traffic. Couple weeks and I will be there. And on the other good roads near there.
 

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I also took an MSF course along time ago, they told us to slow down before the curve and accelerate through the curve to set the suspension.

Good info, or bad info?

most crashes "or mistakes leading" into corners tends to be on corner entry,,,so that's good info
 

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Dragon

Yellow Wolf, Thanks for the post. It must have be nice to have the road to yourself. I could see there was nobody riding up on your rear. Nice to see a different camera location. Be safe and enjoy the ride. Larry
 

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You should be off throttle through the first half of the turn, cracked throttle at and through the apex and accelerate out of the corner. IF you are looking for speed through the corners. Normal cornering with a short apex this works perfect, however with a long apex like on the gap you need to realize you can't accelerate right at the apex.

On the gap ( I went last summer) those corners are not everyday corners and many of them are 120 degrees +. Some seem to be 180 degree turns. These are not turns where normal logic is used with cornering. You can see this with the countless people that come in hot, hit the apex, and go right across the road into the pucker. On a normal turn it would have worked fine, but on the gap, no so fine.

Not sure if I explained well enough?
Keith Code is the most famous proponent of being on the throttle as early as possible. On the other hand, champion racer Simon Crafar recommends being OFF the throttle at the apex and only getting back ON the throttle after the bike comes up off the edge of the tire. That is what I heard on YW's video.

On the Wing, you are not literally on the edge of the tire, but you also don't want to be dragging a foot peg, head for the apex and ADD throttle till you drag the crash bars.

Not sure if I explained that well enough. :lol:
 

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video

That's a different perspective.. Thanks for posting !

One thing I took from it is to put some Eddie Money on my mp3 player ! :joke:

Thanks again YW !
 

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Nice lines, thanks
 

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I also took an MSF course along time ago, they told us to slow down before the curve and accelerate through the curve to set the suspension.

Good info, or bad info?
most crashes "or mistakes leading" into corners tends to be on corner entry,,,so that's good info
Keith Code is the most famous proponent of being on the throttle as early as possible. On the other hand, champion racer Simon Crafar recommends being OFF the throttle at the apex and only getting back ON the throttle after the bike comes up off the edge of the tire. That is what I heard on YW's video.

On the Wing, you are not literally on the edge of the tire, but you also don't want to be dragging a foot peg, head for the apex and ADD throttle till you drag the crash bars.

Not sure if I explained that well enough. :lol:
Good info to make entry the slowest part if your goal is safety. That is MSF's goal. I agree with Rick. That's good information.

Keith and others are proponents of getting on the throttle early, but it is important to understand why. "Setting up the suspension" is true, but how? What are the effects of either maintenance throttle or acceleration?

There's another factor here in the slowest part of the curve related to trail braking. Neither trail braking nor pre-apex maintenance throttle are safer than what MSF teaches, but done correctly both or either might make you quicker through a corner.

As Rick mentioned these are hard to teach on the interwebs. ARC or Track Days are a good place to learn these techniques in a controlled environment.
 

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Thanks Rick,
Felt like I was in the back of Dad's station wagon again! :lol: :joke: Only a heck of a lot faster.:thumbup: And less dust. Great video and music. Thanks for the ride.
John
 

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Discussion Starter #18
heres what I will say about twistys and the wing and its riders

-if your not taking perfect lines slow down and get that part right before you even think about trying to go faster!!

there are plenty of fast wing riders that get by on just twisting the throttle,learn to be a better rider not just a fast rider!!!!!
 

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heres what I will say about twistys and the wing and its riders

-if your not taking perfect lines slow down and get that part right before you even think about trying to go faster!!

there are plenty of fast wing riders that get by on just twisting the throttle,learn to be a better rider not just a fast rider!!!!!
:agree: Thanks Rick nice video :thumbup:
 

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I also took an MSF course along time ago, they told us to slow down before the curve and accelerate through the curve to set the suspension.

Good info, or bad info?

It is good info to a point. If you are trying to ride aggressively you will come off the throttle and do most of your braking prior to entry. On big corners there is lots of time while reaching the apex you can still be slowing using your rear brake, then when you know you can make the corner maintain speed through the apex and accelerate out of the corner.

The first few times on a twisty road I ride partially aggressive. I use lower gear, use engine to do most of the braking on entry, but maintain speed through corner so I get an idea what speeds I can carry though the corner. After you know that, you know what your entry speeds need to be.

Yellow wolf is right about people exiting the road due to entrance speeds. I am guilty of it now and then too. Once I thought I had most of the tough corners remembered on the gap and I was completely on my engine guards with the front tire off the ground.

If you want the thrill of cornering you have to know what to do when things go wrong. I took a crash management course in CA when I lived in ID. Best money I ever spent. They taught you what to do when a front or rear tire washes, how to deal with low/high sides etc etc etc. Lots of it is practice, and having to change your shorts now and then.
 
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