GL1800Riders Forums banner

1 - 20 of 26 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
406 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I was wondering if anyone has experience with nitrogen in their goldwing tires & the results? I have been considering it to improve wear & longevity of the tires.

Ran accross the below comments on google:

I put nitrogen in my Heritage Softail. The ties are stock Dunlops with about 9000 miles on them. Within the first mile I noticed a smoother ride and the hadiling was more "crisp". After going on the freeway I didnt get that wandering feel of the grooved parts on the road. For the $10 at Big O it was worth it.

By
Anonymous, at 5/22/2008 04:57:00 PM


Ron DeLaughter
Cowhide Covers
GL1800 Co-Sponsor
visit my website at www.cowhidecovers.com
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,136 Posts
The car dealer told my mom that nitrogen has a bigger molecule and doesn't escape as easily by osmosis through the rubber casing. My mom has nitrogen in her car tires, and she was happy with the fact that you don't see the seasonal changes in the air pressure.

I'm not sure how one gas or another would make a difference in the handling though...
 

·
15 year Member
Joined
·
6,868 Posts
I put helium in mine ... it makes the wing lighter and i save BIG on my gas MPG's!


Matt(BCNV):popcorn:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,049 Posts
According to Consumer Reports, it slows leakage, but barely. Doesn't seem to be worth the hassle, and certainly not the cost.

Here is their report:

Tires - Nitrogen air loss study

Filling tires with nitrogen rather than air is becoming a common practice in the replacement tire market. This service offers tire dealers another avenue for making money while also promoting safety. The claimed safety benefits often include the potential for reducing air loss compared to an air-filled tire. Maintaining proper inflation can help prevent tire overheating; promote optimum tread life; and reduce rubber aging and wheel corrosion. The use of nitrogen in large truck fleets and the commercial tire industry are well documented and support these claims.
The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) has seen reduced aging of tires filled with nitrogen. Though the data does support that passenger car tires could benefit by all the claims made for nitrogen, tire manufacturers say that they already design tires to perform well with air inflation. And while nitrogen will do no harm, manufacturers say that they don't see the need to use nitrogen, which generally adds $5 or more per tire charge.
Consumer Reports
wanted to find out if nitrogen is worth the price, so we purchased a Nitrogen Inflation System and checked out how well the inflation held up over a one year period. We evaluated pairs of 31 tire models of H- and V-speed rated, all-season tires used in our tread wear test from 2006. We filled one tire per model with air and the other with nitrogen. The test was quite simple: fill and set the inflation pressure at room temperature to 30 psi (pounds per square inch); set the tire outdoors for one year; and then recheck the inflation pressure at room temperature after a one year period.
The tires were filled and deflated three times with nitrogen to purge the air out of the tire cavity. We also used an oxygen analyzer to be sure we had 95-percent nitrogen purity in the tire--the claimed purity limit of our nitrogen system, which generates nitrogen gas from ambient air.
The test started on September 20, 2006 and the final measurements were taken on September 20, 2007. The results show nitrogen does reduce pressure loss over time, but the reduction is only a 1.3 psi difference from air-filled tires. The average loss of air-filled tires was just 3.5 psi from the initial 30 pressure setting. Nitrogen-filled tires lost an average of 2.2 psi from the initial 30 psi setting. More important, all tires lost air pressure regardless of the inflation medium, so consumers should check their tires' air pressure routinely. No evaluation was done to assess the aging claim.
Bottom line: Overall, consumers can use nitrogen and might enjoy the slight improvement in air retention provided, but it's not a substitute for regular inflation checks.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,801 Posts
100% Oxygen in the front tire
acetylene in the rear Tire.
Connected to the throttle body through a pair of solenoids for that extra boost of power up a Hill.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,515 Posts
I'll pass on the Nitrogen; would rather continue as I have with changing the air each year. Just yesterday, I uninstalled Air 2008 and installed Air 2009 (free upgrade); after a quick reboot, I test rode the bike and it was better than ever.
 

·
Vendor
Joined
·
21,876 Posts
Really the biggest advantage of Nitrogen is that it is dryer, and as such the pressure in your tires won't change as much from hot to cold.

I haven't done the tests myself, but I am told that a tire filled with nitrogen will run a little cooler than one with normal compressed air in it. This would be easy to confirm by putting it in a bike that has a SmarTire system that monitors internal temps. I was planning on doing this one day, but never got around to it, and don't have the SmarTire system installed anymore.

There are drier products you can buy to add to your compressor that will remove moisture from them, and this probably would be just as effective.

http://www.ecompressedair.com/dryers.shtml

Here is an interesting product ($17), intended for paint sprayers, but it looks like you could attach it to tire valve fitting and use it to fill your tire with. I dunno how long it would last though before you would have to replace it. They claim it reduces humidity to 1/2 of a percent. I suspect that if you used this on a compressor that didn't have any type of filter already on it, that it might not last long.


http://store.ecompressedair.com/detail.aspx?ID=22215

 

·
Registered
Joined
·
649 Posts
We use nitrogen in aircraft tires, because it is dry compared to compresssed air. At the altitudes we fly at the moisture in the tires would freeze and cause all sorts of problems. A foot note: we also use something called avaitors breathing oxygen which is dry compared to medical oxygen which has a higher moisture content, again for the same reason of freezing at altitude.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
571 Posts
Nice try Nitrogen sales people

Too much PITA...promotes
not checking tires
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,530 Posts
We use nitrogen in aircraft tires, because it is dry compared to compresssed air. At the altitudes we fly at the moisture in the tires would freeze and cause all sorts of problems. A foot note: we also use something called avaitors breathing oxygen which is dry compared to medical oxygen which has a higher moisture content, again for the same reason of freezing at altitude.
Yes makes sense....next time I have my Goldwing up at 35,000 feet I will have all nitrogen in my tires!! :joke:

As I will next time I ride in a left handed oval at 200mph for 500 miles like NASCAR
 

·
Vendor
Joined
·
21,876 Posts
Really the biggest advantage of Nitrogen is that it is dryer, and as such the pressure in your tires won't change as much from hot to cold.

I haven't done the tests myself, but I am told that a tire filled with nitrogen will run a little cooler than one with normal compressed air in it. This would be easy to confirm by putting it in a bike that has a SmarTire system that monitors internal temps. I was planning on doing this one day, but never got around to it, and don't have the SmarTire system installed anymore.

There are drier products you can buy to add to your compressor that will remove moisture from them, and this probably would be just as effective.

http://www.ecompressedair.com/dryers.shtml

Here is an interesting product ($17), intended for paint sprayers, but it looks like you could attach it to tire valve fitting and use it to fill your tire with. I dunno how long it would last though before you would have to replace it. They claim it reduces humidity to 1/2 of a percent. I suspect that if you used this on a compressor that didn't have any type of filter already on it, that it might not last long.


http://store.ecompressedair.com/detail.aspx?ID=22215


UPS delieverd my new $17 Desiccant Snake last night, and I purged the air in my new tires and refilled it with air from the new hose. Normally, I can shoot air from my compressor onto my finger and feel moisture in it. With the new hose in place, I no longer can feel any moisture at all coming from the hose output. They claim it removes moisture vapor down to 1/2% relative humidity.

I have no idea if this will have any affect, but I am leaving on a trip through the southwest and will be doing some hot tire pressure checks along the way just to see if it makes a difference. I suspect the reduction in humidity levels will also reduce hot tire pressures some, since the air won't expand as much when heated.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,293 Posts
Gee, nitrogen in the tires nitrogen in the gas. me thinks if you had an accident it would be a big bang with lots of fireworks
 

·
Hungry Member
Joined
·
5,045 Posts
I bet that hose is filled with calcium chloride. That stuff will suck the moisture like crazy.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,374 Posts
Gee, nitrogen in the tires nitrogen in the gas. me thinks if you had an accident it would be a big bang with lots of fireworks
Someone's not been paying attention. Nitrogen doesn't support combustion. Stu
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
948 Posts
I'd rather just buy more chrome. :rolleyes:
 
S

·
Guest
Joined
·
0 Posts
Nitrogen in tires

Do you also need nitrogen-compatible valve stems, like you need synthetic oil-compatible crush washers?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,419 Posts
I have been riding bikes for 40 years and been on MC sites for dozen or so years.
I have never read or seen a tire blow up and kill the rider and passenger because it had"air"in the tires.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
948 Posts
Well said, gr8phun. :thumbup:
 
1 - 20 of 26 Posts
Top