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Discussion Starter #1
Nothing, NADA,
2006 comfort package, I think it has the original battery. Has not been load tested. Bike always starts right up

I went 50 miles this morning, all OK. Bike sat for 6 hrs. When I started the bike I had a blank dsipaly screen and no turn signals FOR THE 1ST TEN MILES, then everything started working.

Trying to duplicate problem after returning home, but everything is working UNLESS I switch the iginiton key to ACC, then no power.

I have a manual if someone could direct me to a page.

Suggestions?
 

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Discussion Starter #2
update

after sitting for an hour, I have no display, audio, or turn signals.

Still no power in the ACC position.

I do have a horn which is the same fuse as the turn signals.

Fuse #10, the ACC term is good.

Thanks for any suggestions.
Jim
 

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You know the simplest answer

is usually the right one...pull the battery and get it load tested. Or swap it with another's. I am assuming that you recently did not have any work done on it.
 

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I think you need a new battery. Batteries get to where they will not take a charge and if they sit a bit will go flat. Start the bike and run a bit it build ups a bit of charge and all works.

Soon it will not start.
 

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load test the battery

I have a battery tender, I will put it on and see what happens. Thanks
The battery tender will work to get the battery at least up to nominal voltage with no load on the battery. Depending on how old the battery is, and the overall useage history is on it, the battery plates may not be able to sustain the load placed on it.

But going along with the previous posts about the problem may be the battery, I'll keep this posting brief - I have some other posts going in depth with battery life, etc.. But to truly check the condition of the battery, pull it and take it to an auto parts store and have a load test done on it. Free and dispells any worries.

A quick load test you can do at home is connect a voltmeter to the bike's battery (or other convenient spot). Turn the key on and look at resting voltage with the lights on, engine off. even after several minutes it should be above 11 volts. Now twist the throttle fully open and hold it. This prevents the fuel injectors from providing fuel while cranking the engine. Press the start switch and let the engine crank. Voltage will very momentarily drop to low 10s to the mid 9s, then return to the mid 10s while cranking for 10 seconds. If the battery can't keep the voltage up --- time to replace.

Obviously check the battery connections for tightness.

Also, your ignition switch may be failing. Wouldn't be the first time a set of contacts have failed in the switch.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Update #2

Took the battery to Napa Auto parts, he said the battery is good. On the way to the Honda shop, I stopped at an auto mechanic that I use, he tested it and said it was good, had 228 CCA
I have the extended warranty so off to the shop it goes.

Any more suggestions for the Honda Shop?

Thanks,
Jim
 

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Also, your ignition switch may be failing. Wouldn't be the first time a set of contacts have failed in the switch.
That would be my opinion. If the battery is strong enough to start the bike, it will certainly have enough juice to power on anything fed by the ACC position on the ignition switch. A bad or failing ingition switch could also give you intermittent symptom. Do the symptoms come and go if you wiggle the key back and forth slightly? You could try some contact cleaner/lubrication spray (NOT WD-40!) on your switch, but I doubt it will reach the contact if you just squirt it down the key hole. I've never taken one apart, but even though I was an Electronics Technician in my early career, I don't think I would trust a Gold Wing ignition switch that has been taken apart for a repair/cleaning.

The problem with replacing your ignition switch is that you have to replace all the locks on your bike at the same time, otherwise you end up having to carry two different keys. When I replaced the ignition switch on my 1989 GL-1500, it only came as a kit with the ignition switch, fuel access door, right fairing pocket, and rear trunk locks all together with a new set of keys. The bad news was that my ignition switch was not bad. I had a faulty tip-over switch which acted like a bad ignition switch. BUGGER!

Cheers.
 
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