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My favorite thing to forget is putting in my earplugs, then I have to pull over and do it - already have some ringing and don't want it getting any worse.

I like the Pinlock earplugs (coupled with my Sena SMH-10) but they're a pain to get in (no more than any other), requiring removal of the helmet, which requires lifting the modular face, putting up the eyeshade, removing the glasses, undoing the strap, taking off the helmet, readjusting the head liner that came loose on my head, finding a place to set the helmet, inserting the earplugs, then everything in reverse.

Reaching up and mashing a little bulb a couple times, perhaps without pulling over depending on conditions, seems easy-peasy in my mind.
 

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My favorite thing to forget is putting in my earplugs, then I have to pull over and do it - already have some ringing and don't want it getting any worse.

I like the Pinlock earplugs (coupled with my Sena SMH-10) but they're a pain to get in (no more than any other), requiring removal of the helmet, which requires lifting the modular face, putting up the eyeshade, removing the glasses, undoing the strap, taking off the helmet, readjusting the head liner that came loose on my head, finding a place to set the helmet, inserting the earplugs, then everything in reverse.

Reaching up and mashing a little bulb a couple times, perhaps without pulling over depending on conditions, seems easy-peasy in my mind.
You guys are gluttons for punishment. Keep it simple.
 

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A couple things come to mind when talking about an active noise cancelling headset, way too complicated and the greatly reduced inability to hear what's going on around you on the road. I like a very subdued background noise, just enough to let me know there is a vehicle near my space.
Active phase noise cancelling does not reduce your ability to hear what is going on around you, it actually makes it easier to hear outside noises. It only cancels cyclic background noise, like that from an engine or the tire noise on the road. By reducing the background drone, it makes other noises easier to hear.

I've been trying for nearly 20 years to get various motorcycle intercom manufactures to make an active noise cancelling system, and every one of them have told me it can't be done, yet none of them every actually tried or tested it. It can be done, and it isn't that hard to do, as has been shown by the link at the top of this thread. I also made my own system and tested it and it does indeed work. I just don't understand why none of the manufactures like Cardo, Sena, Starcom, etc haven't jumped on this.
 

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Active phase noise cancelling does not reduce your ability to hear what is going on around you, it actually makes it easier to hear outside noises. ... I've been trying for nearly 20 years to get various motorcycle intercom manufactures to make an active noise cancelling system, and every one of them have told me it can't be done
This. I have worn ANR aviation headsets for a decade, they are far superior to passive NR sets (based on 20 years experience with those). I can actually hear the engine (at lower volume) instead of it being masked by the wind noise.

I use Bose ANR earbuds under my helmet for longer rides. For short rides, it's Eargasm earplugs (quick and easy). For anything over 45 min, it's the Bose.
I underdstand SENA has come out with an ANR helmet. No idea how well it works.
 

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I got a pair of Bose headphones with noise cancelling at Christmas. I love them and that function is amazing! We both have hearing loss so we have Arai helmets with preinstalled J&M headsets. Awesome combination but they don’t cancel out all the damaging noise. That’s the trade off for me. I want the best intercom and stereo hearing I can get but I also want to hear sirens in the distance. I’m sure some audio wizard will partner with a helmet company and produce it someday, but a noise cancelling system masks noise, it tricks your brain into not recognizing/acknowledging the noise. It’s what hearing aids do for tinnitus. Hearing protection has to seal out damaging noise. Not sure how you do that and still hear sirens and horns etc .....
 

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I've been trying for nearly 20 years to get various motorcycle intercom manufactures to make an active noise cancelling system, and every one of them have told me it can't be done, yet none of them every actually tried or tested it. It can be done, and it isn't that hard to do, as has been shown by the link at the top of this thread. I also made my own system and tested it and it does indeed work. I just don't understand why none of the manufactures like Cardo, Sena, Starcom, etc haven't jumped on this.
I don't think any mayor manufacturer will tackle this because a good properly functioning system requires proper fitment to work properly. There's limited amount of space in these helmets combined with different speaker positioning for each rider's needs. I like the idea of the big cups posted in them article, but that's not going to fly in the Shark helmet I use, it might with the Shoi for the other bike. Also, I like to keep things simple and using an active system only means another battery I have to remember to charge. Personally, I prefer hardwire over bluetooth, that's just me. Like I said before, the little space used by the ones I fabricated for my helmet do the job nicely and sound quality is awesome. So, for me I am ahead as I don't have to think about anything other than strapping on the helmet and going. One should never have to think about their accessories if they are seamless.
 

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Hi all,

A Revolutionary Noise Canceling Helmet: Alvin Halfaker’s Quiet Ride Helmet

This is an attempt to bring noise-cancelling technology to motorsports. I'm posting this merely as an item of interest, not as an endorsement either of the concept or the execution. I have used Bose noise-cancelling headsets while flying and they work well to cut--or at least mask--cabin noise. It occurs to me that sounding quiet may not necessarilly be the same as being quiet, meaning that this technology might or might not be better for our hearing than ear plugs. It might only sound quieter while only masking the dangerous effects of noise.

A Revolutionary Noise Canceling Helmet: Alvin Halfaker’s Quiet Ride Helmet
I'd pay twice the money for a helmet if it came with Bose speakers ... just say'n !!!
 

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Discussion Starter #28
I'd pay twice the money for a helmet if it came with Bose speakers ... just say'n !!!
Some of what I've heard about noise-cancelling describes the manipulation of frequencies so they negate each other, and this seems like actual cancelling of the noise, but other descriptions seem like the technology makes the environment "sound" quieter, creating an illusion of silence, without really negating the noise, and it's the noise that does the damage. In other words, I don't want to be paying for technology that, although it sounds quieter--and thus does make the ride more enjoyable--is still injuring my hearing. Also, I'm concerned about a too-tight fit around my ears blocking out sounds that I need to hear to ride safely.
 

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Some of what I've heard about noise-cancelling describes the manipulation of frequencies so they negate each other, and this seems like actual cancelling of the noise, but other descriptions seem like the technology makes the environment "sound" quieter, creating an illusion of silence, without really negating the noise, and it's the noise that does the damage. In other words, I don't want to be paying for technology that, although it sounds quieter--and thus does make the ride more enjoyable--is still injuring my hearing. Also, I'm concerned about a too-tight fit around my ears blocking out sounds that I need to hear to ride safely.
What you are talking about is taking the noise signal and reproducing it at the same amplitude 180 degrees out of phase, which will null out the original signal. Great idea in a perfect world, but do you really want that level of complexity? Again, we need to keep it simple.
 

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Discussion Starter #30 (Edited)
What you are talking about is taking the noise signal and reproducing it at the same amplitude 180 degrees out of phase, which will null out the original signal. Great idea in a perfect world, but do you really want that level of complexity? Again, we need to keep it simple.
Thanks, yes, that's it exactly.

The idea of "keeping it simple" is--irony intended--more complex than it at first sounds. Ideally, very complex tasks and technologies can be harnessed to give us simple choices. For instance, my DCT is very complex relative to an old-style manual transmission from 50 years ago, but it gives me simple choices (D or N). An ideal noise-cancelling helmet would be simple to put on (not require pumping up a bladder), create a genuine quiet zone around my ears, but allow necessary sounds to come through. (Just noodling with the idea.)
 

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Thanks, yes, that's it exactly.

The idea of "keeping it simple" is--irony intended--more complex than it at first sounds. Ideally, very complex tasks and technologies can be harnessed to give us simple choices. For instance, my DCT if very complex relative to an old-style manual transmission from 50 years ago, but it gives me simple choices (D or N). An ideal noise-cancelling helmet would be simple to put on (not require pumping up a bladder), create a genuine quiet zone around my ears, but allow necessary sounds through. (Just noodling with the idea.)
Very true.
 

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... other descriptions seem like the technology makes the environment "sound" quieter, creating an illusion of silence, without really negating the noise, and it's the noise that does the damage. ... although it sounds quieter--and thus does make the ride more enjoyable--is still injuring my hearing.
I understand the concern. However, ANR is certified by the Federal Aviation Administration, by the US Air Force, and my every major airline in the world. ANR does work.
It does cancel out the sound (my aviation headset works in MUCH higher sound levels than what you find inside a helmet). It does NOT create an illusion of sound reduction, it actually reduces the amplitude (volume) of the exterior sound.

If ANR only created an illusion of noise reduction, and exposed you to hearing damage, they would never have been certified by the FAA, the Air Force, Army, Navy, and Marines, and nearly every airline in the world.
 

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Discussion Starter #33
I understand the concern. However, ANR is certified by the Federal Aviation Administration, by the US Air Force, and my every major airline in the world. ANR does work.
It does cancel out the sound (my aviation headset works in MUCH higher sound levels than what you find inside a helmet). It does NOT create an illusion of sound reduction, it actually reduces the amplitude (volume) of the exterior sound.

If ANR only created an illusion of noise reduction, and exposed you to hearing damage, they would never have been certified by the FAA, the Air Force, Army, Navy, and Marines, and nearly every airline in the world.
Thank you, Alan. Good to know.
 

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A couple things come to mind when talking about an active noise cancelling headset, way too complicated and the greatly reduced inability to hear what's going on around you on the road. I like a very subdued background noise, just enough to let me know there is a vehicle near my space.

I ended up making my own set to go with my PackTalk Bold. I'm using a set of 40mm drivers with a plastic enclosure on the back for sound isolation and tuning. Very simple and sound great! I can now have beautiful bass and decent highs with extremely low background noise on my 18' DCT Tour cruising at 70-80MPH without being bothered by wind noise. And the best part is I don't need to turn the bike's volume up past 10 anymore. The speakers work so well that I even can hear the limitation of Honda's bluetooth as I notice some high frequency rolloff. When I go directly from the Samsung Note 9 to the PackTalk via bluetooth the highs are amazing.

Here's what they look like installed in my helmet. And they are so comfortable I don't even feel them.

View attachment 364919

View attachment 364920

i like what you did here and would like to do the same... can you post links to the items you used? As I search for them there are loads of similar items to search through..

thanks!
 

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<...> I just don't understand why none of the manufactures like Cardo, Sena, Starcom, etc haven't jumped on this.
Licensing patented technology, probably.

There's a key patent (or more than one, possibly....) that none of those vendors wish to query on the cost to license that technology. Or, if they have, the price is prohibitive.

So they don't.

Pretty simple, actually.
 
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