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Doesn't running 42-44 PSI with a non runflat eliminate the soft plush ride characteristic of the runflat @ 28-32 PSI?
 

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Doesn't running 42-44 PSI with a non runflat eliminate the soft plush ride characteristic of the runflat @ 28-32 PSI?

They are both car tires. I have NRF tires on the cage and I run 32 psi.

I have a RF on the Wing and I run 32 psi.

I can see increasing the NRF pressure if doing severe twisties but not casual cruising.


:thumbup:
 

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My experience is that anything below 40 ish psi in a NRF will give you a plusher ride. I've ridden them with 32 psi.

However, anything other than a slow pace in curves, you may feel the backend wallowing.

Any CT will generally give a softer ride....unless it's a NRF at around 44, at least to my butt..
 

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I have never run a RF so I can't comment on one of those. I normally run different pressure depending how and where I'll be riding!:thumbup:
 

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Doesn't running 42-44 PSI with a non runflat eliminate the soft plush ride characteristic of the runflat @ 28-32 PSI?
It depends on the tire. My Falkens ride as smooth at 44 than 195 Dunnie winter sport at 32psi . Kumho at is smoother than Dunnie and Hankook NRF was rougher at 44. Every tire is different in my book !!
 

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44PSI in my Falken NRF rides smoother and softer then
my Kumho RF at 33PSI.

2 reasons for this:

#1 the sidewalls are softer on the NRF

#2 the NRF is 6 pounds less weight then the RF and
anyone with a lick of sence knows the more unsprung
weight you have the crappier the feel of the motorcycle
or car for that matter.

RF = safer ride at lower speeds for average riders. IE:
Social Club (owners)

NRF = safer ride at high speeds in the hands of very
experienced riders. IE: (motorcyclists)

IMO both RF & NRF tires are much better tires then M/C
tires on a Wing. Only the RF will do evil things in corners
specially "S" turns when pushed to the max which the
average Wing rider will never see.

I've rode my RF & NRF maxed out threw the same "S"
turns and on direction change the RF gives a very
violent tank slapper almost lock to lock under full
throttle. This is due to the heavy C/T can not change
direction as quick as the front lighter tire so everything
gets all bound up in the chassis. With the NRF in the
same corners at same speeds the handle bars just
shake slightly because the chassis does not bind up as
bad with the 6 pound lighter rear tire. My Wing has
full Traxxion suspension also. Not many Wing riders
will push a Wing that hard so RF or NRF will make very
little difference to most Wing owners.

Enjoy what ever you choose to ride on.. :thumbup:
 

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I have NRF on my car and run them at 44 PSI for the improvement in gas mileage. A lot of cages our running there tires to soft and on a SUV this can cause the tire to come off wheel in a slide. I run 44 psi when riding two up on the wing. I have ran as low as 38 but like 40 to 41 the best, when it's below 36 it seems to move around more on roads that have a rut cut into them by trucks. 44 one up feels like a hard MT. Just enjoy what you have. :coffee1:
 
G

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Doesn't running 42-44 PSI with a non runflat eliminate the soft plush ride characteristic of the runflat @ 28-32 PSI?
Yes it does 100%. 26-30 is the range that will offer great soft ride and 40k plus mileage.

40psi is 40psi no mater if it's a cement radial or normal radial, end result is poor wear and harsh ride.
 

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Yes it does 100%. 26-30 is the range that will offer great soft ride and 40k plus mileage.

40psi is 40psi no mater if it's a cement radial or normal radial, end result is poor wear and harsh ride.

LOL"LOL"LOL" :roll: :roll:
 

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Chuck, you just have to ignore stormy. He is constantly posting atypical results.

Atypical results for an old blue hair that parks in handy
cap parking because he's to old to walk with out his
walker. LOL"LOL" :roll:
 

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Yes it does 100%. 26-30 is the range that will offer great soft ride and 40k plus mileage.

40psi is 40psi no mater if it's a cement radial or normal radial, end result is poor wear and harsh ride.
Hey storm, just figured out (from one of your other posts) how you get 40,000 miles on a tire running @ 26 psi.

:congrats:
 

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Storm has got a nice pony tail and curvy build, sweet:thumbup:
 

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The Max PSI is printed on the side of every tire. This is the PSI the tire is designed to run at. A tire that has a speed rating is designed to run at that speed at the Max PSI. Any thing lower and you lower the speed rating and the load caring capacity of the tire. In the 70's when radio tires first came out all most all had a max psi of 32. But over the years that PSI has gone up in the 80's early 90's it was 38 PSI. Now all most all my car tires have a max rating of 44 psi. I have a NRF car tire on my wing and when riding two up I run 44 PSI and it feels smooth and feels great when hitting bumps and joints in the Hyw. But if I do not lower the PSI when riding one up it begins to fell harder and I can feel the joints and bumps, as I said feels like a hard MT. I lower psi to 41 psi one up and it feels like it did at 44 two up smooth and quit. At 38 psi I can feel the back of the bide move around a little esp. on roads that the trucks have cut a rut in. As the back of the bike or the rear tire encounters the side of the rut it wants to move a way from it. I have felt this when my MT was low on air pressure as well, the back of the bike wants to steer the bike. :coffee1:
 
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The pressure rating is just as it says - maximum not necessarily recommended pressure.
It's a matter of weight not speed or use. Less weight on the tire and the pressure requirements are lower. Good example are tires on trikes. these are standard car radials rated at max pressure of 40-44 but are run at 10-20psi as the weight is not enough to create a proper footprint at higher pressures.
On the Can-Am same thing as the factory recommendation is 12.5-17psi on the front.
On a GL the weight on a 208x60 is about half that of the comparable weight this tire would suspend on a car.
This is the main reason most are getting rather poor mileage out of the CT's on MC's. Much like running improper pressure on your car tires will drastically shorten the life expectancy.
It's more a matter of rationalization rather than solid reasoning. And of course it's very difficult to get past the feels like or imagined results. I will agree there is a mental security to adding more air. I have done this myself but found once you get past this mental block things are not as they seem.
Case in point. I just installed a good used NRF Kumho K21 prior to our west coast trip. Filled it and added a couple extra pounds due to riding two up and compartments loaded. So 30psi and off we went. As usual handling was fine and we were out in west Idaho in the mountains and the GL had no problems in corners or keeping up with the others. In the morning of our forth day I checked the rear tire as it seemed to have developed a wiggle due to the cold and it being parked on the sidestand all night. Pressure was 23psi. I stopped at a gas station and filled it to 32psi just in case it leaked down again. Of course mentally it seemed different, harsher riding, seemed to take a bit more effort to corner, etc. After pushing the mental picture aside it dawned on me that nothing really changed. It cornered the same for the most part and the rest of the day I just rode as normal. Just for fun I jacked it up to 38psi and again the only real difference was I could feel the seams in concrete so I knew the ride was not as soft but other than than it was the same.
I did find a nail in the tire and plugged it and set the pressure at 28 which is where I normally run.
The honest results from my perspective were 24-38 there is very little to no real noticeable difference in ride or handling. Most of the handling differences seem to be related to the mental awareness not actual performance.
The only way to truly prove this would be to change the pressure and not tell the rider and then get the responses. I an guessing the data accumulated would be interesting and enlightening.
 

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I am going to agree with Storm here, at least on some things. I am not a tire expert so this is not about load rating or speed. But it it about the perceived "feel". I have been a subscriber to Motorcyclist Magazine since 1982. There have been some fast riding editors there during those years. Some of you have surely heard of Nick Ienatsch, Mitch Bhoem and Kent Kenitsugu. Apologies if I misspelled their names but you get the gist I bet. Seems there was a big discussion about tires way back when and since they didn't have a tire expert like the self proclaimed one we have here, they did a blind tire test. They took the biggest baddest bikes of the time, the GPz1100 and the other sport bikes of the era and had Willow Springs for the day, and a pile of tires and someone to change them all out. I have moved a few times since the early 80s but I bet given a day or two, I could find the issue somewhere. If I recall, most of the riders were surprised when they blindly took a bike out not knowing what brand of tire or psi in the tire they were on and they chose their favorite. I vividly recall the "shroud of impartiality" or some such thing they called the box with the bottom cut out as they were led to the bikes, so they couldn't identify the tires. And I would bet my own money that a lot of us here are in that same boat, that try as we may, we can't tell the difference if we don't see what we're riding on. Not knocking anyone, just think a lot of this feel is what we think we know. I am not talking NRF vs RF but Pirelli vs Kumho and so on. And I also think 32-34 is not discernible. Again, just what I think and I would love to be proven wrong, I really would. Flame suit on, fire away!
 
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