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hmmm, in theory I should be able to see it tonight, but I dont know what those coordinates tell me to do as far as where to look (outside of to the south...)
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Ziggy,

In this example for Jacksonville, FL:



Let's use the first row for an example. As you read across, The "Satellite" is the International Space Station (ISS). Next is the local time for the sighting. Next is how long you can expect to see the satellite (ISS). Then is the "MAX Elevation in Degrees". All this means is how high in the sky it will appear during the track. In this example, it will only reach 20 degrees above the horizion. Remember, 90 degrees is straight overhead.

Then there is the APPROACH and DEAPRTURE. In this example, if you look to the South, you will first see the ISS at 10 degrees above the horizion. It will then move across the sky and depart your view 20 degrees above South-SouthEast.

The second row is much longer viewing. It appears in the South, departs to the East, reaching a max height of 25 degrees above the horizion. Total viewing time is approximately 4 minutes.

Hope this helps.

Bartman
 

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dtbmjax - aka Bartman said:
Ziggy,

In this example for Jacksonville, FL:



Let's use the first row for an example. As you read across, The "Satellite" is the International Space Station (ISS). Next is the local time for the sighting. Next is how long you can expect to see the satellite (ISS). Then is the "MAX Elevation in Degrees". All this means is how high in the sky it will appear during the track. In this example, it will only reach 20 degrees above the horizion. Remember, 90 degrees is straight overhead.

Then there is the APPROACH and DEAPRTURE. In this example, if you look to the South, you will first see the ISS at 10 degrees above the horizion. It will then move across the sky and depart your view 20 degrees above South-SouthEast.

The second row is much longer viewing. It appears in the South, departs to the East, reaching a max height of 25 degrees above the horizion. Total viewing time is approximately 4 minutes.

Hope this helps.

Bartman
Bartman,
THanks for the tips....I went to the website mentioned above as well and they said the same thing and I think I understand. However, the way they put it...it sounds like the ISS will appear a ways after the horizon in the west and then disappear before it hits the horizon in the east...that is where Im getting confused a little bit.
 

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Try this link http://www.heavens-above.com/gloss.asp?lat=28.539&lng=-80.672&alt=1&loc=Merritt+Island&TZ=EST&term=altitude

Like the picture imagine your sitting inside of an inverted half of a ball or bowl with you in the center. As an object "appears in the sky" for viewing it may be not very high from the horizon. Objects close to the horizon are harder to see, and since they are not traveling in a straight line but in an arc, appearing to get higher in the sky. At the highest point they seem brightest because they are closer and the sky is darker the higher you get. If you go to the NASA site I gave you they show where the object is and if you'll look at the red circle around the ISS that would be your horizon from the location it passes over... imagine you under that circle.

I get to work several times a year on an island that is 8 deg south of the equator and in the center of the South Atlantic....great for star and object watching.
 
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