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A friend of mine took his 02 Goldwing to a Honda dealer to have a minor problem fixed but the service department said they no longer work on bikes older than an 07 . He called another dealer and was told the same thing . Is this now commonplace among dealers ? has anyone else heard this from a dealer ?
 

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That's why/how I found a great mechanic back in NC. It's probably a combination of what their mechanics know and liability of working with an older bike with potentially more things that can be damaged during maintenance.
 

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A friend of mine took his 02 Goldwing to a Honda dealer to have a minor problem fixed but the service department said they no longer work on bikes older than an 07 . He called another dealer and was told the same thing . Is this now commonplace among dealers ? has anyone else heard this from a dealer ?
It's been common place at car dealers for years.

I've often considered higher labor rates for older Wings. But thus far have not done so.
 

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A friend of mine took his 02 Goldwing to a Honda dealer to have a minor problem fixed but the service department said they no longer work on bikes older than an 07 . He called another dealer and was told the same thing . Is this now commonplace among dealers ? has anyone else heard this from a dealer ?
Yes, this is becoming commonplace. Typically dealers wouldn't work on bikes more than 20 years old. Now the trend seems to be not working on a bike more than 10 years old. There are still some dealers out there that will work on older bikes. They are few and far between. I'm fortunate to have a dealer in my neck of the woods that will work on older bikes.
 

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Yes.

Dealers typically don't and can't keep techs to be trained on older vehicles and parts for older vehicles. I imagiine it varies from dealer to dealer what the cut off year is before they won't work on a vehicle.

A good acquaintance of mine owned a family run Honda dealership. He would often refer owners with older macines to local, independent motorcycle repair shops that he trusted.

No different than trying to take your 1969 Chevy SS396 or 1970 Dodge Coronet RT 440 to your local Chev or Dodge dealer for service . . . you can try, but they'll likely steer you towards an independent shop.

Tim
 

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Yes.

Dealers typically don't and can't keep techs to be trained on older vehicles and parts for older vehicles. I imagiine it varies from dealer to dealer what the cut off year is before they won't work on a vehicle.

A good acquaintance of mine owned a family run Honda dealership. He would often refer owners with older macines to local, independent motorcycle repair shops that he trusted.

No different than trying to take your 1969 Chevy SS396 or 1970 Dodge Coronet RT 440 to your local Chev or Dodge dealer for service . . . you can try, but they'll likely steer you towards an independent shop.

Tim
Our local Chevy, Ford and Mopar dealers will work on the older cars and welcome those customers. Both of the local Harley dealers welcome vintage Harley owners to bring there bikes in for work. One Yamaha dealer welcomes vintage Yamaha owners. BMW and Indian dealer welcomes vintage owners and there bikes. Honda, Suzuki and Kawasaki dealers are idiots you don't want touching your bike and they turn away anything 13 years old or older.
 

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That's why/how I found a great mechanic back in NC. It's probably a combination of what their mechanics know and liability of working with an older bike with potentially more things that can be damaged during maintenance.
Clay, could you share who that great mechanic in NC is? I have a 2002 1800 and may be in need of service I can't perform.Thanks.

NCBirdMan
 

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I DON'T go to stealership so, I have no idea.

ONLY time I go, is when my wife's new Camry need service. Everything else, I take to shop nearby with certified mechanic.

My bike, either I do myself or down the road to local guy who does Goldwings only and were told that even stealership techs go to when they're stumped...
 

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Our local Chevy, Ford and Mopar dealers will work on the older cars and welcome those customers. Both of the local Harley dealers welcome vintage Harley owners to bring there bikes in for work. One Yamaha dealer welcomes vintage Yamaha owners. BMW and Indian dealer welcomes vintage owners and there bikes. Honda, Suzuki and Kawasaki dealers are idiots you don't want touching your bike and they turn away anything 13 years old or older.
If I owned 1970 Chevelle SS396, I certainly would not trust a Chevy dealership to, say, repair anything other than perhaps an oil change.

I'm not a business person, so I don't understand the logic by which business owners decide what's the cut off point. And to us 'civilians' it makes no sense to turn away business.

I can say my acquaintace said he referred customers as to indy shops because older parts were more difficult to source, older bikes were more fragile and prone to breaking, and the technical know how wasn't always available. The extra care and time to work on older vehicles would run up the dealer level labour costs higher than customers would tolerate. So he was doing his potential customer a favour by trying to save them some money.

Yes it's frustrating, but it is what it is.

Tim
 

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If I owned 1970 Chevelle SS396, I certainly would not trust a Chevy dealership to, say, repair anything other than perhaps an oil change.

I'm not a business person, so I don't understand the logic by which business owners decide what's the cut off point. And to us 'civilians' it makes no sense to turn away business.

I can say my acquaintace said he referred customers as to indy shops because older parts were more difficult to source, older bikes were more fragile and prone to breaking, and the technical know how wasn't always available. The extra care and time to work on older vehicles would run up the dealer level labour costs higher than customers would tolerate. So he was doing his potential customer a favour by trying to save them some money.

Yes it's frustrating, but it is what it is.

Tim
For those that have no skills here they can get there vintage cars and bikes serviced and worked on pretty easy. The reason most dealers now days won't support older iron is they have no skills. They don't have true mechanics. They have techs. The older stuff is very easy to work on. And they have no real parts managers. They are button pushers and inventory regulators. They haven't a clue how to source parts or even what the parts do. I worked for over 30 years as a manufactures rep in the Boiler, chiller, pump world. It didn't matter if the boiler was a brand new Clever Crook or a 100 plus year old Babcock & Willcox marine back boiler. The good guys with skills and work ethic can and will fix them all and they all know where to get the parts. Modern dealers have no real trouble shooting or mechanical skills. It's plug in and change the part the computer tells them to change with no real understanding or knowledge of the part or what it does or what could cause the failure. Anything that requires skill and craft is almost dead in the once great USA, England and other first world country's.
 

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I've had bad mechanics at dealers, some at independent shops... but, dealers do have a limit on what they will work on. One locally says 20 years, another says 15. Most people needing work on an older machine likely need some major repair, or the motor worked on etc... not just a tire change etc. I overheard ole Gilbert at CalCoast Motorsports while repairing my bike on the road have this conversation with a guy on the phone. After he hung up, he told me the last time he tried to get into a motor that was old it just became a disaster with breaking bolts and such...
 

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1970 Chevelle SS396
:giggle:
 

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Here the 3 larger Honda dealerships will not service any bike more than 10 years old, however they will change tires and do oil changes. With an older bike that needs other service try contacting your local Goldwing Riders Association who may refer you.
 

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I'm retired now: BUT, I was repairing heating systems, I used to be called to do service on units that were older than I was: I was fixing them, but then it got to the point that these units kept breaking down, and it was getting harder and harder to get parts for these heating units.............. ALSO another problem that I was having WAS THAT THEY KEPT BREAKING DOWN, NOT WHAT I just fixed, but something else.... and customers thought that because I fixed this old relic once, that every part was warrantee for life.... Meaning (example here only) if I changed the spark plugs, and a month later you got a flat tire, they expected me to come over in the middle of the night to fix it for free again.....I'd get::: Quote: you fixed it last, and expected me to run to their house all hours of the night (many, many 2AM service calls)..........

Ronnie
 

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Tossing this out there.....why would a shop want to tackle working on an old motorcycle (and risk many of the items previously mentioned) when they already have enough work with newer bikes that are familiar to them and where parts may be more readily available?
 

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It's been common place at car dealers for years.
I have a friend that works for a Toyota dealer and he said if Toyota built it they will work on it no matter how old. With that said around here they do the same at Honda dealerships
 
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