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I was coming back form Arkansas last weekend and it was raining. Headed South on 37 at 75+ mph according to the honda speedo and on a new set of lops that I had worn in on the trip up to AR :D . I had tall trees on either side of the road and thought that would keep the wind gusts from bothering me. Not so - :cry: All of a sudden the Bike started to dive side to side and the handle bars were moving in time with the dives. The front of the bike was sliding and the back tire was still glued the the ground. (no RPM surge) I glanced down at the speedo for a check and said two very bad words. I also slowed the throttle just a tad so not to break loose the rear tire from a snap shut of the throttle. I realized that I did not want to hit the asphalt at this speed so I was going to gain control and did not even think of an exit plan. As the speed dropped just a little the sliding from side to side started to become less. I then staarted to work the handle bars to try and straighten the bike - I was bracing for when the front tire gained traction so that it would not jerk the bike from one side or another but that did not happen. After a about three more slides the bike became true and under control. I have riden for 35 years and never laid a bike down. I am proud to say that I did not soil my undies. ALthough this was the most scared poopless I have ever been on a bike. :shock:

If this has ever happened to you and you brought it back to control or if the bike got away from you I would like to hear about it. I would love to come up with a formula of a safety margin at speed rainning and wind speed.


All the Best
Chuck Nuber

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Glrider56 said:
I would love to come up with a formula of a safety margin at speed rainning and wind speed.


All the Best
Chuck Nuber

214 284 7136
You can start by keeping the speed safe and reasonable when the rain is falling. 75MPH in the rain just seems wreckless to me.
 

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Which Dunlops did you have, the original (CRAP) style D250's or the Elite IIIs? Was there a lot of tar snakes on the road you were riding? I removed the D250s from my Wing at 7300 miles due to the very poor wet road handling of them and went to the Bridgestones, which are a big improvement. I had to replace the rear due to damage from FOD. I now have a Bridgestone front and a Dunlop Elite III rear (70 series).
 

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Been riding for over 50 years !! When the road is wet, My speed drops below 60 MPH, When the road is wet and wind is harsh, Speed drops even more. I have tested tires at higher speeds. When I installed the car tire on my bike I rode 80 MPH in rain as a test but still drop back when it rains.

Got on a new road in Mississippi a few years ago and it started raining and it was so slick I almost went down, had both feet out and both tires sliding, really got my attention. even stopped and walked and it WAS SLICK. I don't know what they had in that road, but my thoughts were of snot.

No reason to ride real fast in the rain... Hydroplaning comes to mind !!

Please keep the shinny side up :lol:
 

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You didn't mention whether you had cruise control on or off. I learned the first week I had Rio to not ride in the rain (or on damp roads) with the cruise set. Other than that. you were probably hydro-planing at those speeds in the rain. Slow it down and live a bit longer!

Mesquite Bob
 

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Yes, hydroplaning

Sound's like hydroplaning.

I have been wondering at what speed the rain makes a 'Wing fly.

Glad you recovered safely!

p.s. On a ride yesterday, I got a warning from my local friendly LEO for being in a hurry (dry conditions.) The officer was a captain and kept asking me if I was in a hurry. It did not occur to me until later that the answers he pulled out of me made me think about it. I kept replying "I am not in a hurry." I later realized that this thought and my saying it to myself actually did slow me down. He did not ell me to slow down; I told myself to slow down. Good, practical of psychology. Nice work, Captain!
 

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First things first.......I'm glad for your safety. I'm sure your loved ones are too !

As was posted above tho, I keep my speeds to 60 and under in rain, and have been known to get on the right hand side of the right hand lane and keep it around 50 mph. I just did a trip to Minot ND, 2000 miles round trip, and over 1200 miles was in the rain. Needless to say, it was about 1300 miles of 50-55 mph. Not fast, but, I felt comfy with that and the Stock D-250s.
 

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Great description of your recovery :!: It certainly sounds like the front tire was hydroplaning to me. I'm glad you weren't in a corner when that happened. :shock:

Thank you for sharing your experience so we might all learn from it. :wink:
 

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To avoid hydroplaning, keep your wet speed below 9 times the square root of the air pressure. So with 41 psi in the tires:
square root of 41 = 6.4
x 9 = 57.6 knots
* 1.15 to convert to mph = 66 mph.
* 1.04 to convert to Honda mph = 68 mph indicated.

This does not account for slick spots!

David M.
 

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Jeezh n00b, maybe you need to take coarse in Hydro Dynamics...
 

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So far, I have never had a Wing hydroplane. Should not say that because the next time it rains........

That really sounds peculiar. Not familiar with 37 and do not know what kind if surface it has.

That is one of those "we will never know" kind of things.

I was riding into Doss from the south one sunny afternoon with an old timer following me on his Magna. I was running about 70 and he was too, about 100 yards back.

Suddenly, there was a dip in the road about 3 feet deep and it had about a foot of water in it. My friend Tink said that wather went over the utility poles and wires on each side of the road. However, the bike did not hydroplane. It did decelerate very rapidly for the 50 feet or so it was in the water. My trailer probably floated breifly. Needless to say, that was a real surprise. That road is about 2 miles as straight and level as you can imagine with the white steeple of the church in Doss making a pretty picture. The dip was not evident until I was right on it.

I go slow on curvy wet roads but usually run with the traffic on the interstates. On marked turns, I obey them in the wet.

I had a flat in Canada on my 01 and got a new back tire in Danbury on the way back. They only had Bridgestones. I thought I would die before getting home, especially in Ohio. The whole trip was in the rain, and the bike back end did exactly as you described the front end of your bike doing. It started doing that one time and I simply held my left arm high over my head and all the truckers backed away. The bike sashayed wildly for a couple hundred feet. I worked over to the shoulder and got off to see what was flat. There was no flat, it was just that no good slipperier than an eel Bridgerock, which I took off at the dealer the day I got home and said he could give it to anyone that wanted it. It only had 2,000 miles on it, going forward and about 10 miles sideways. I understand they improved the Briderocks after the 2001-2002 treachery, but I was so frightened by them that I will probably never go back.

Good show on not going down.
 

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Found the following at: http://www.msgroup.org/DISCUSS.asp Tip 199

There are many variables to take into consideration so there are no set answers but there are some 'rules of thumb' that we can talk about:

On dry pavement

Your tire traction can usually handle about 1.1 g of acceleration. When your tire demands exceed that amount of traction you skid which reduces their ability to handle acceleration by about 20%

On wet (not standing water or with depth less than about 1/4 inch). Your tire traction can usually handle about .8 g of acceleration. When your tire demands exceed that amount of traction you skid which reduces their ability to handle acceleration by about HALF

If standing water or depth greater than about 1/4 inch. Traction available at speeds less than about 50 MPH remains able to handle about .8 g acceleration (though I have low confidence in that number). When your tire demands exceed that amount of traction you HYDROPLANE which reduces their ability to handle acceleration to essentially ZERO.

Hydroplaning is more probable:
The faster you go.
The wider your tires.
The lower the air pressure in your tires.
The deeper the water is.

This is true regardless of whether you are accelerating (in a straight line or turning) or not.

It is most likely that your front tire will hydroplane before the rear one does because you ride a single-track vehicle. That is, the front tire squeezes most of the water off the roadway by the time the rear tire gets there. But those of you who have put an extra wide tire (perhaps even automobile type) on the rear wheel will find that you have changed that dynamic. The odds of the rear tire hydroplaning first in that scenario goes up dramatically.

One last thought ... water drainage on a freeway (any wide roadway, actually) drains to the right (in the U.S.) and that means that the depth of that water is greatest in the SLOWEST LANES. That should suggest that the odds of hydroplaning is about equal in every lane (slower movement but greater depth makes the slow lanes as dangerous as the faster lanes.)
 

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GLrider,
just a thought. were you riding on a concrete roadway with deep raingrooves? These can cause the situation you've described.
Front tire & handelbars "diving" side to side, while the rear tire is stable,doesn't sound like hydroplanning to me.
Sounds more like a "tankslapper". :shock: More violent than a "weeble", "wobble", or a "shimmy"., :lol: but usually controlled with a speed adjustment.
As others have said, slow down in wet weather.
stay safe,
the hobo
 

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David M-
I apologize! I thought you were inventing formulas to prove your point. I stand corrected.
 

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Sounds like hydroplaning to me. It could be that the rear tire just felt more stable. The key to avoiding hydroplaning is to slow down and try to avoid puddles of water, if at all possible.

I was responding to a hot call (back before I retired from law enforcement) one night. It was raining pretty hard, and as I came down a shallow hill, I hit some standing water that was all but invisible in the dark because there were no streetlights. Suddenly I lost all steering and the car began oscillating side to side, then began spinning around. I made a complete 360 degree spin, plus another 180 turn and came to rest facing the opposite direction, on the opposite side of the road. After I pulled the seat cover out of my rear, I thanked heavens that I didn't go off the road and that there was no other traffic. That was one VERY interesting ride!!! I'd hate to think what it would be like on a motorcycle.
 

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Definitely sound's like hydroplaning. Slow down when riding in the rain, hard to believe you haven't crashed before now if you ride this way often.
 
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