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Well here's one for you!

I met a guy that owned a taxi cab company and here's what he told me;
They were running Fords and the parts were so cheap they decided to quit changing motor oil, just add oil as needed.
He said they would easily get over 100K out of the engines and then just pop a new one in the cab and put it back in service. (By law, where he was, the vehicles had to be taken out of service before they reached 400K so they might put 350K on the cab with only one engine change, but some did need two engines.)
Not surprised. Popular Mechanics had an article a few years ago written by one of their guys who bought a new lawnmower and forgot to change the oil every year, then intentionally did not do it. I think he went 8 years and had it tested. It came back slightly out of spec, but still had all of its lubricating qualities.

Oil is the lifeblood of the engine, and changing it is easy. People do it out of old habits and it feels good when you think you’re doing something to take good care of your machine. Plus there’s no way to prove it isn’t necessary. Truth is, though, it’s just about feeling good - changing it under the manufacturer’s spec has been proven to not serve any practical purpose.


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You can now buy small lawn mowers that require NO oil changes -- Just Check & Add as needed...
 
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You can now buy small lawn mowers that require NO oil changes -- Just Check & Add as needed...
America has turned in to a disposable economy. I think you can buy them for the price of an oil change !!!
 

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Not surprised. Popular Mechanics had an article a few years ago written by one of their guys who bought a new lawnmower and forgot to change the oil every year, then intentionally did not do it. I think he went 8 years and had it tested. It came back slightly out of spec, but still had all of its lubricating qualities.

Oil is the lifeblood of the engine, and changing it is easy. People do it out of old habits and it feels good when you think you’re doing something to take good care of your machine. Plus there’s no way to prove it isn’t necessary. Truth is, though, it’s just about feeling good - changing it under the manufacturer’s spec has been proven to not serve any practical purpose.


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I have changed the oil in our seldom used Craftman push mower only a couple times (maybe even less) in the past 20+ years. It starts every spring with a few plungers on the primer first pull. I'm not sure if it even got used this year. It's not much of a priority.
 

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Well here's one for you!

I met a guy that owned a taxi cab company and here's what he told me;
They were running Fords and the parts were so cheap they decided to quit changing motor oil, just add oil as needed.
He said they would easily get over 100K out of the engines and then just pop a new one in the cab and put it back in service. (By law, where he was, the vehicles had to be taken out of service before they reached 400K so they might put 350K on the cab with only one engine change, but some did need two engines.)
My Dad owned a Standard Oil station for a short time in the mid-50's. Changed a lot of oil and greased a lot of zerks (remember when cars/trucks needed chassis lubes?) and minor shop repairs.
The old guy that had the small town taxi cab service back then never had the oil changed either, just brakes and grease jobs. The old Plymouths he used burned enough that he said changing oil was unnecessary and after 3000 miles he had already gone through more than 5 qts. Who knows, but of course, back then if an engine made it 100k mikes before a major overhaul it was something to brag about. Now, 250-300k is common enough that no one mentions it.
 

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So, it begs the question; if 20k engine oil is perfectly fine without significant disadvantage, why would an oil company manufacture any other engine oil product?
 

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Skeptic, yes because you haven't offered any concrete evidence to support "He too used Amsoil" as being a direct cause or contributing cause to those deposits.

I don't know..................I don't think GWGreg was saying ANTHING about AMSoil in particular. I believe he was just showing a dirty engine. No mention of ANY brand. At least the way I read it.
 

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I don't know..................I don't think GWGreg was saying ANTHING about AMSoil in particular. I believe he was just showing a dirty engine. No mention of ANY brand. At least the way I read it.
Thank you ... the only reason Amsoil was mentioned was because the OP had mentioned it. My comment had everything to do with poor maintenance intervals.
 

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my normal oil change is about 9,000 miles .
there have been several 10,000 mile oil changes and even one 12,000 mile oil change.
My wing currently has 556,000 miles and still runs like new.
View attachment 374019

At an average speed of 50mph that equates to 462 day + in the saddle moving...


WOW --
 

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my normal oil change is about 9,000 miles .
there have been several 10,000 mile oil changes and even one 12,000 mile oil change.
My wing currently has 556,000 miles and still runs like new.
View attachment 374019
Used to change oil every 10,000 miles on semi trucks. Of course - they put thousands of miles per week on those things. We used to have a standard recommendation on the fleet of "gassers": Change oil every 3 months or 3,000 miles. The reason was, if you only did short trips, you needed to go by time, if you drove longer trips, you went by miles. Times and technology have changed, but the principle is the same. Just longer intervals or mileages, without those considerations, determine your success or failure at maintaining a clean engine.
I think your success is attributable to the miles you travelled, in the time between oil changes. Therefore, you really weren't spacing you oil changes too far apart. Another factor is: We use better oils and additive technology now, too. Good job!
 

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So, it begs the question; if 20k engine oil is perfectly fine without significant disadvantage, why would an oil company manufacture any other engine oil product?
Money.

Even with 20 years of data with GL1800s and cycledude's half million miles with extended oil changes and not one single report of any oil-related failure, some people still proudly proclaim that they would NEVER wait 8,000 miles for an oil change. They think that makes them appear wise... I think the opposite. But it shows how entrenched people get with their superstitions. So if people will buy products, companies will make them.
 

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Money.

Even with 20 years of data with GL1800s and cycledude's half million miles with extended oil changes and not one single report of any oil-related failure, some people still proudly proclaim that they would NEVER wait 8,000 miles for an oil change. They think that makes them appear wise... I think the opposite. But it shows how entrenched people get with their superstitions. So if people will buy products, companies will make them.
Sooner maintenance reduces risk. Also, some get lulled into believing one motorcycle represents them all. In reality, it only represent 1 of many. A far better representations is having a fleet of 1,000, all being rode by various riders, and in different climates and under different conditions. If that were the case, I highly doubt he'd get the same results ... in fact I absolutely guarantee it. It can be such an eye opener, that he'd probably change his maintenance habits on them all, as would someone managing a fleet of vehicles such as a trucking company. What I cannot guarantee a head of time, is knowing which ones are gonna be the odd balls with different results.
 

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Sooner maintenance reduces risk. Also, some get lulled into believing one motorcycle represents them all. In reality, it only represent 1 of many. A far better representations is having a fleet of 1,000, all being rode by various riders, and in different climates and under different conditions. If that were the case, I highly doubt he'd get the same results ... in fact I absolutely guarantee it. It can be such an eye opener, that he'd probably change his maintenance habits on them all, as would someone managing a fleet of vehicles such as a trucking company. What I cannot guarantee a head of time, is knowing which ones are gonna be the odd balls with different results.
You proved my point. Risk of what? What has happened?

We do have a fleet of bikes and different riders: The members of this board. And we have 20 years of data. Tell me how many oil-related failures you have seen.
 

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You proved my point. Risk of what? What has happened?

We do have a fleet of bikes and different riders: The members of this board. And we have 20 years of data. Tell me how many oil-related failures you have seen.
I suppose it depends on how one describes failure. Failure as in on a trip with a major engine break down ??? Or failure because of poor maintenance habits, a repair now cost more ??? I see lots of the latter. The Wing in post #2 is a great example of that. His repair would have been cheaper if he had more frequent oil, and air filter changes, a proper oil filter, and by using non-synthetic oil.

A fleet service manager has a huge advantage when he makes even a minor change to how a fleet is being service. For example, let say he changes oil brands and weights. He still has just as many "engine repairs" but because of his new oil choice, he now see the cost per repair has increased. Another way of saying that is that he is watching trends.

In my business, and only working on GL1800s, and I see trends, and I often report them here. A common example that I'm often reporting are burnt clutch plates on trikes. In all cases, the customer uses synthetic. I've not yet seen one burnt clutch plate with Honda's GN4 conventional oil. Although it does not represent poor maintenance, or engine failure, it's oil related, probably does represent poor oil choice, and certainly increases his repair costs when doing a transmission repair ... he now gets to pay for a clutch pack also.
 
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