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I have a 2008 GL1800 and I am changing the oil the first time by my self and I don't know what the torque setting is for the oil bolt. Can you assist me in this request? Thanks, fellow Goldwing riders.
 

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Run it in snug finger tight, snug it with an closed end wrench, bump the wrench a bit with the palm of your hand and call it good.

Not going to fall out.
 

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Thanks you guys! You are great and this forum is a great place for a library of information and make new friends. Airglider
 

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:agree: None of my torque wrenches will fit in the space anyway...


If you are still overly concerned...you can loosen a similar sized bolt somewhere else, use a torque wrench and torque it to 22 or so, then use a regular wrench and see how tight it is to get the 'feel' of 25 ft/lbs. It'll put you in the ball park. Another thing I will sometimes do for low-torque fasteners, is either use a short wrench, or if using a long wrench, I grip it near the fastener to reduce the leverage. Just some ideas to throw out there...
 

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25 ft-lb.
that is what the manual suggests but i think thats way to tight, its a steel plug screwing into aluminum ! good thing is the aluminum that the drain plug screws into is easilly replaced if someone manages to strip out the threads

i just use a boxend wrench and snug it up good kinda like Kit suggested :thumbup:
 

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"And you can reuse the crush washer for life."

WHAT?!?!?!?!?!:eek:4:
 

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that is what the manual suggests but i think thats way to tight, its a steel plug screwing into aluminum ! good thing is the aluminum that the drain plug screws into is easilly replaced if someone manages to strip out the threads

i just use a boxend wrench and snug it up good kinda like Kit suggested :thumbup:
And, of course, lots of us have torqued it to 25 using a good torque wrench, without any problems. I think the Honda engineers understand steel going into aluminum.

Using a "calibrated wrist" could indeed strip it. Or leave it too loose.
 

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And, of course, lots of us have torqued it to 25 using a good torque wrench, without any problems. I think the Honda engineers understand steel going into aluminum.

Using a "calibrated wrist" could indeed strip it. Or leave it too loose.
very true :thumbup:

i tried the torque wrench on the oil plug once, worked fine but at the next oil change when i went to take out the drain plug i was surprised at how over tight it seemed, i never used a torque wrench on the drain plug again
 

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Originally Posted by Tryker
And, of course, lots of us have torqued it to 25 using a good torque wrench, without any problems. I think the Honda engineers understand steel going into aluminum.

Using a "calibrated wrist" could indeed strip it. Or leave it too loose.

very true :thumbup:

i tried the torque wrench on the oil plug once, worked fine but at the next oil change when i went to take out the drain plug i was surprised at how over tight it seemed
Yep. I just drained my oil. The plug was indeed tight. Using a long wrench, it did exactly what a properly tightened bolt in good condition should do. Hard to turn at all at first, actually flexing the wrench, snapped loose in one very short motion, and then could be spun out very easily by hand. I am careful to make sure the threads have oil on them when I put it back, to avoid galling the aluminum. And my torque wrench is an excellent one. Clickers need not apply. :)

I guess Honda knows what they're doing about torquing fasteners. :) Their advice to change the crush washer might be good, too, and it might affect the applied torque to the bolt. :) Of course, if you don't want to spend 35 cents on a twenty thousand dollar vehicle... :)

The smileys are intended to show this post is intended to be constructive, not simply crotchety. When I work on a treasured vehicle, and my safety is at stake, I do like to do things right, with the right tools. Might be a residual from when I raced cars.

It does tend to take me take longer than most to do most anything. And I spend a few more dollars. I actually replace Honda one use bolts after one use.
 

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Originally Posted by Tryker
And, of course, lots of us have torqued it to 25 using a good torque wrench, without any problems. I think the Honda engineers understand steel going into aluminum.

Using a "calibrated wrist" could indeed strip it. Or leave it too loose.
Yep. I just drained my oil. The plug was indeed tight. Using a long wrench, it did exactly what a properly tightened bolt in good condition should do. Hard to turn at all at first, actually flexing the wrench, snapped loose in one very short motion, and then could be spun out very easily by hand. I am careful to make sure the threads have oil on them when I put it back, to avoid galling the aluminum. And my torque wrench is an excellent one. Clickers need not apply. :)

I guess Honda knows what they're doing about torquing fasteners. :) Their advice to change the crush washer might be good, too, and it might affect the applied torque to the bolt. :) Of course, if you don't want to spend 35 cents on a twenty thousand dollar vehicle... :)

The smileys are intended to show this post is intended to be constructive, not simply crotchety. When I work on a treasured vehicle, and my safety is at stake, I do like to do things right, with the right tools. Might be a residual from when I raced cars.

It does tend to take me take longer than most to do most anything. And I spend a few more dollars. I actually replace Honda one use bolts after one use.
I hear what you are saying but do you do the same for your 4 wheelers? I have owned Wings since 1976, 1981, 1983, 1989, 2006 and have always changed my own oil. Never replaced crush washer or torqued anything when changing oil. Never had a leak or a problem. Guess I must be lucky! You can take maintenance to an extreme.
 

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Have never used a torque wench on any drain plug.

I've been in maintenence for 39 years in a steel mill. What I have learned in that 39 years is that there is a fine line between WORLD CLASS MAINTENENCE AND WORLD CLASS STUPIDITY, wonder how many on this site cross that line?
 

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hand tight

Yep,hand tight with a handled wrench.

that is what the manual suggests but i think thats way to tight, its a steel plug screwing into aluminum ! good thing is the aluminum that the drain plug screws into is easilly replaced if someone manages to strip out the threads

i just use a boxend wrench and snug it up good kinda like Kit suggested :thumbup:
 

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You can take maintenance to an extreme.
I just have to disagree with that word. Properly tightening a bolt to manufacturers specifications is taking things to an extreme?

Sure, many have gotten away with just using their calibrated wrist. But, I don't do my own maintenance to get away with things, or even mostly to save money. I do it mostly because I think I'll do it better than the young kid on the clock at the dealer. I don't trust his calibrated wrist either.

OK, I've bored people enough.
 

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Originally Posted by Tryker
And, of course, lots of us have torqued it to 25 using a good torque wrench, without any problems. I think the Honda engineers understand steel going into aluminum.

Using a "calibrated wrist" could indeed strip it. Or leave it too loose.

Yep. I just drained my oil. The plug was indeed tight. Using a long wrench, it did exactly what a properly tightened bolt in good condition should do. Hard to turn at all at first, actually flexing the wrench, snapped loose in one very short motion, and then could be spun out very easily by hand. I am careful to make sure the threads have oil on them when I put it back, to avoid galling the aluminum. And my torque wrench is an excellent one. Clickers need not apply. :)

I guess Honda knows what they're doing about torquing fasteners. :) Their advice to change the crush washer might be good, too, and it might affect the applied torque to the bolt. :) Of course, if you don't want to spend 35 cents on a twenty thousand dollar vehicle... :)

The smileys are intended to show this post is intended to be constructive, not simply crotchety. When I work on a treasured vehicle, and my safety is at stake, I do like to do things right, with the right tools. Might be a residual from when I raced cars.

It does tend to take me take longer than most to do most anything. And I spend a few more dollars. I actually replace Honda one use bolts after one use.
I suppose one learns by doing and with experience. Some things such as securing a oil drain plug , over many years and millions of cars and bikes and motors and equipment, you never see a mechanic ever pick up a torque wrench for that.

I never do. I also will not over tighten and strip it. Yes the kid at the shop may do so.

Crush washers are not crush washers, they are but a simple soft metal seal. There is no crush to them. Some cars have an o ring used for the seal. Almost all boat motors use an o ring for a seal.

Using a torque wrench on non structural and repeat use items.

It is just that with time and doing and knowledge it simply is not even a consideration to do so. Simply snug will do.

On motorcycles the most damage done to the bikes for the most part is simply the fact many over tighten fasteners. This tends to strip bolts and thread bosses and create an all day problem when it should be a ten minute job.

The general accepted way of things most with experience simply never even consider it. But what happens with repeated use or repeated torque, gradually the plug, bolt, thread boss , grow weaker and weaker with use. To the point it will one time simply strip , snap, break, or create a serious issue . Repeated use wears and weakens fasteners. That same fastener will last forever at a lesser but adequate simply snug.

No need for it actually. The only drain plug that will ever leak is the one that has been over tightened , be it by a good tug on a wrench or by the use of an air impact tool. Such as you do sometimes see used at some of the oil change franchises and even in some motorcycle shops.

The crush washer is not a crush washer, it is but a simple soft metal washer to maintain a seal. Nothing gets crushed. The soft metal simply conforms to the seal surfaces.

The one shot bolts are designed that way for a reason, they are made to use one time and to re use, you can about three times, then they also weaken and snap. This you learn by doing also .

Wheels, pinch bolts, axle nuts, lug nuts, engine bolts ,rear drive and all important parts should be torqued. Unsafe not to .

Maintenance repeat use items, no one does, no need for it. It is what is learned in the field, not in a book.
 

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Crush washer DOES crush

Just measured a new washer 0.079 inch

Used washer 0.069 inch

If you look at both sides of a used washer you will see a ridge on the
inside diameter on one side and a ridge on the outside of the other side.

I had to remove a bit of one ridge to get the micrometer on.

Even without a micrometer, those ridges are caused by areas that are not
pressured by the plug and you have to logically deduce that it is being
compressed in the non-ridge areas.
 

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Everyone has an opinion, I have 1 fact. If you over tighten the bolt, other than stripping the threads, you run the risk of breaking the case out around those very threads. I'm not trying to flame anyone. I know this because I did that very thing on my VTX. If it hadn't been for a machinist/welder (and a damn good one) brother of a friend of mine, I would have had to have the cases replaced. I've always done my own maintenance on everything I've ever owned, and I've never had anything like this happen. But, like the saying goes, "there's a first time for everything", and it was my turn. I don't think it was because I over tightened on this one particular time tightening the bolt, I think it happened over time with maybe a little too much torque every now and then from guessing at 22 ft/lbs, and finally cracking the metal. Then, on this particular time, everything crumbled. No matter what it is you're tightening, if you over tighten, something has to give, even if only a little at a time.

USE A TORQUE WRENCH!!!
 

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, I think it happened over time with maybe a little too much torque every now and then from guessing at 22 ft/lbs, and finally cracking the metal. Then, on this particular time, everything crumbled. No matter what it is you're tightening, if you over tighten, something has to give, even if only a little at a time.
USE A TORQUE WRENCH!!!
Something has to "give", something is designed to "give". That something is called the crush washer. More importent than using a torque wrench is using a crush washer that still has some "give" in it. We make lots of fun over them and some crush washers outlast the whole bike, but using a fresh crush washer and tightening the oil bung bolt until it makes contace and just a little more will seal the case and never strip threads or break the case. 22#" is not that much, but I doubt I ever tighten it that tight.

prs
 
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