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The manual says to remove the lower front portion of the fairing when doing an oil change.
But the filter can be removed from below without bothering to remove the fairing. It's a little tight--but very do-able.
Has anyone found a reason to actually go ahead and remove the fairing as the manual instructs?
 

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Nope. No reason whatsoever. I followed the procedure on my first wing in 1996 and it took 2 hours to get the thing back together. Then I bought a filter wrench that fits over the end of the filter and never fought it again.
 

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No need to remove

Honda likes to make everything sound difficult so you take to the shop:tools1:
 

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Nope- not me. I have an oil wrench that looks like a warped set of Channel-Locs and use that to loosen the filter. Got it at Harbor Freight and it works like a champ. I even use a slightly longer filter than standard and still no sweat. Changing the oil on my Wing is a breeze compared to a lot of other bikes that I have had.
 

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The manual says to remove the lower front portion of the fairing when doing an oil change.
But the filter can be removed from below without bothering to remove the fairing. It's a little tight--but very do-able.
Has anyone found a reason to actually go ahead and remove the fairing as the manual instructs?
I followed the manual the first time I changed the oil in 2002. Never again!

It's just too easy! Pull the drain plug, spin off the old filter...
 

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NOPE!!! that's HARDWAY HONDA for ya :eek:4: :22yikes::22yikes::22yikes::22yikes::22yikes::shrug::shrug::joke::joke::joke::joke::lol::lol::lol:
 

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You should not use a belly pan. It's caused overheating issues on thousands of Wings. And there are guys here who have ridden thousands and thousands of miles and never needed a belly pan so then neither should anyone else. Now the crush washer is a whole new matter!
 

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I did take it off the first time--as per the manual, but soon learned it wasn't necessary--and took a whole lot more time! No need.
OB
 

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You should not use a belly pan. It's caused overheating issues on thousands of Wings. And there are guys here who have ridden thousands and thousands of miles and never needed a belly pan so then neither should anyone else. Now the crush washer is a whole new matter!
It is difficult to know with certainty but I doubt the belly pan I have could cause overheating. 1) it is made from aluminium (a comparatively good conductor of heat); 2) it is mounted very low on the machine; 3) anecdotal evidence of driving through your great state on I-70 recently with ambient air temperature exceeding 104°F (as measured by the Wing's Air Temp) resulted in no apparent increase in operating temperature of the engine (as measured by the Wings heat gauge).

On the plus side my belly pan has numerous "dings" and it just seems to me these dings are better in a sheet of aluminium than the more tender oarts under the Wing.
 

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2010 GL1800, I do all my own oil changes and I can get the filter on and off very easy without having to remove anything.
 

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Oil Change Question

After riding thousands of miles without a belly pan, I recently had an old bolt (apparnetly kicked up from the road) knock a hole in my oil filter, I now have a belly pan. Luckily it happened close to home...haven't noticed a change in tempurature guage since adding belly pan, but I feel more confident knowing oil filter and coolant resevoir are better protected.
 

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It is difficult to know with certainty but I doubt the belly pan I have could cause overheating. 1) it is made from aluminium (a comparatively good conductor of heat); 2) it is mounted very low on the machine; 3) anecdotal evidence of driving through your great state on I-70 recently with ambient air temperature exceeding 104°F (as measured by the Wing's Air Temp) resulted in no apparent increase in operating temperature of the engine (as measured by the Wings heat gauge).

On the plus side my belly pan has numerous "dings" and it just seems to me these dings are better in a sheet of aluminium than the more tender oarts under the Wing.
Gee, I could not have said it better myself. And thanks to you I don't have to.
 
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