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Discussion Starter · #21 ·
That does NOT look at all correct. Are you SURE that is an oil drain bolt? The pic makes it look recessed and where is the crush washer that is supposed to be under it? Take another photo from a bit further out for perspective.

prs
Here is a pic with more context...
Automotive tire Hood Motor vehicle Tread Automotive exterior
 

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Hi gang. I went to change my engine oil today, ride a good bit to warm it up, parked, got oil pan and as I grabbed my 12mm socket and box-end wrenches, I found they did not fit easily/well. None the less I continued to try to get them on and thought I had a good fit but upon applying pressure to loosen the bolt the head stripped. This happened several times and I now have a fully stripped bolt head. Any ideas shy of a tap & die? I think I may need to head into the shop to have them deal with this. It really sucks and it super frustrating. Here is a pic of the bolt - its the first of the three located nearest to the front. Thanks! Rob

View attachment 408178
Find a six point SAE socket that’s close and pound it on


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Found a number of other posts suggesting "Bolt Extractors" which look like normal sockets but seem to narrow the deeper you go.
These bolt extractor sockets work great, especially with a cordless impact wrench. I recently bought the Irwin set in the link above to remove a spindle on my mower. Amazon has a variety as well.
 

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I had a similar problem with an overtightened drain bolt. A proper sized extractor socket solved the problem though you will need a replacement bolt. I just put the bike on the center stand and put the socket on my 1/2 inch ratchet and it came right off. I did check the races with my tap and die set to be sure there was no damage (there wasn't).
 

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Counter Clockwise to take that bolt off. when you are looking down from the top to bottom it is clockwise but when looking up from the bottom to the top it is counter clockwise. If you use a ratchet and 6 point socket and twist in in your hand before application you can not go wrong.
 

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Personally, that doesn't look like the right bolt. But, I don't own a 2018 either. What does your owners manual show. That bolt to me looks like like it is recessed into an allen head bolt.
 

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It does kind of look like it's in the same spot as Brian's #1 bolt in post#2 of that spotless engine. (Right next to that curve where you put the oil filter wrench on the filter. ). What is like to know is how an engine can be so clean. Is that a '22 ?
 

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Shadows make it look recessed. I thought that at first too.
Ignore them and it looks like a drain plug.

good luck
 

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Personally, that doesn't look like the right bolt. But, I don't own a 2018 either. What does your owners manual show. That bolt to me looks like like it is recessed into an allen head bolt.
Pic in post #21 shows it better. It is one of the 3 drain bolts on a DCT.
 

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That pic is a WHOLE lot better. Looks like your socket was a very poor fit or not all the way on the hex head. Six point socket and tap it on over a layer of foil. CCW to off.

prs
 

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I couldn't wrap my head around the first pic until I could look at your second pic. I actually have the same thing happen in pictures of tracks in the desert. The lighting can reverse the perspective. Which is not even remotely helpful but...

It looks to me like you have enough room to get a real good bite with a vice-grip. I'm a 'lay 'er down' guy, but I don't have any experience with the current bikes. But laying it down would allow you to get straight AND square.

I've never drilled an oil plug for an ez-out but I have drilled and removed a lot of regular bolts. Obviously drilling would make a huge mess (not as much with it on it's side). I much prefer the 'square edge' removers if it comes to that.

The bolt is obviously tight. Really tight, in fact. I'd be a little concerned about galling in the threads. So, I'd also recommend that you run a 'chip chaser' or a tap down the hole to make sure the threads are good.

If you do have to drill and tap I'd strongly suggest that you flush the pan with solvent a couple of times before you put the permanent oil in.

One more thing. I'd suggest you borrow a torque wrench and torque the plug on install. Then you will get a feel for how tight it needs to be.
 

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Hi gang. I went to change my engine oil today, ride a good bit to warm it up, parked, got oil pan and as I grabbed my 12mm socket and box-end wrenches, I found they did not fit easily/well. None the less I continued to try to get them on and thought I had a good fit but upon applying pressure to loosen the bolt the head stripped. This happened several times and I now have a fully stripped bolt head. Any ideas shy of a tap & die? I think I may need to head into the shop to have them deal with this. It really sucks and it super frustrating. Here is a pic of the bolt - its the first of the three located nearest to the front. Thanks! Rob

View attachment 408178
Is it me or does this look like it is countersunk, and remember the only reason this happens is wrong size wrench or cheap tools note made to spec, and to remove it I would first see if a sae size wrench would fit now since the head is ruin, lay it on it's side and get a impact drive you use with a hammer and try that it will bite and twist @ the same time when you strike it with a hammer.
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Is it me or does this look like it is countersunk, and remember the only reason this happens is wrong size wrench or cheap tools note made to spec, and to remove it I would first see if a sae size wrench would fit now since the head is ruin, lay it on it's side and get a impact drive you use with a hammer and try that it will bite and twist @ the same time when you strike it with a hammer. View attachment 408206
Man, you guys are scary! As fragile as this bike is I sure as hell am not going to beat on it like a constipated ape would. Way too much overthinking here.
 

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It does kind of look like it's in the same spot as Brian's #1 bolt in post#2 of that spotless engine. (Right next to that curve where you put the oil filter wrench on the filter. ). What is like to know is how an engine can be so clean. Is that a '22 ?
That's my 2022 Trike.......picture taken when it had 20 miles on it! :)
 

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Go see a Snap-On or MAC tool man and purchase that size 6-point socket....does not matter what it costs, you will use it forever.
Use a hot air heat gun( not a torch!) on the surrounding case for a couple minutes, not on the drain plug itself.
That should get you enough expansion, it should not take much...don't push it.
Might not be a bad idea to do this with the bike on its side for better access, as you had suggested.
Make sure that you have help doing this or you may break something...yourself or bike.
Have a new plug on hand and torque to spec. May be able to borrow a torque wrench from a parts store.
Most people that do not wrench often, tend to put about double the force of spec on smaller stuff when tightening, which leads to these issues.
Easiest thing would to be to pay someone you trust with all the tools to get that thing off.

Good luck !
 
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