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Thats the way the drain bolt looked on my 06 Gold Wing. Had to use vice grips to get it off. Found out someone before me put one of those aftermarket magnetized tip drain plug on. Metal was too soft. Threw it away and got a stock drain bolt. No more problems.
 

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View attachment 408192

I picked up these bolt extractors at Sears. They may be available at Ace, Lowes or Harbor Freight now.
I have a set of this type of extractor; mine are Irwin brand. If you can get them to bite on the stud, then they are the absolute dog's bollocks.
 

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2018 Honda Gold Wing
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Something happened with the oil drain bolt in my car...the dealer used a 12 point socket instead of a 6 point and stripped the bolt head and of coarse the guy that did it never said a thing.
I had to take a small chisel and a hammer to tap a notch in the outer edge of the bolt so the bolt could be tapped loose...I bought a new OEM oil drain bolt and a 6 point socket so the bolt can be removed without rounding it out...use the right tool for the job and there won't be a issue like this.
 

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Discussion Starter · #47 ·
Hey guys. Thank you all very much for the ideas & suggestions. Still no joy. Something is very off. I changed the oil myself 15 months ago and am sure I didn't torque it down that tight. Anyway, vice grips, bolt extractor, wd40, profanity, crying and despair have not yielded much in terms of results. I have a more stripped head and an acceptance of defeat. New bolt (2) in the mail and here Thurs. Will call shop tomorrow and make appointment. I would have loved to put it down on her side for better leverage but I only do that in super market parking lots when mistakenly thinking kickstand is down. Would also have loved to take off the exhaust so I could have a little room to work. Alas no. Anyway, all a great help and really thought that would do the trick.
 

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I was thinking the same thing Patch, but was hesitant to mention it as this was a drain plug. I wasn't sure if it was applicable here, but then this stuff is not my forte. I've read about mechanics welding something on to a rounded bolt head in order to remove it, but ????
 

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I'm a habitual over torquer. I don't have any suggestions that have not been otherwise mentioned and I'm lucky that I haven't broken anything too expensive. Yes, I have a torque wrench but I'm always too busy to go grab it.

I have a question. Why does Honda (and all the others) post torque specs but it seems that some manufacturers not follow their own specs? I have had trouble removing factory tightened bolts and have even had to spear oil filters installed by manufacturers.
 

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Go see a Snap-On or MAC tool man and purchase that size 6-point socket....does not matter what it costs, you will use it forever.
Use a hot air heat gun( not a torch!) on the surrounding case for a couple minutes, not on the drain plug itself.
That should get you enough expansion, it should not take much...don't push it.
Might not be a bad idea to do this with the bike on its side for better access, as you had suggested.
Make sure that you have help doing this or you may break something...yourself or bike.
Have a new plug on hand and torque to spec. May be able to borrow a torque wrench from a parts store.
Most people that do not wrench often, tend to put about double the force of spec on smaller stuff when tightening, which leads to these issues.
Easiest thing would to be to pay someone you trust with all the tools to get that thing off.

Good luck !
First make sure you get a well known name as Ridefar said but get the impact one in the six point it has less chance of opening up and trying to round it of anymore, or just go to your local mechanic shop and if any techs have what you need just see if they will rent the socket to you.
 

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May be too far stripped now, but the koken Japanese made surface drive sockets can't be beat. Koken USA is fantastic to buy from.
 

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Just finished talking with my auto-mechanics about this today. Considering all you've tried thus far, they recommended two options here. First, heat up the engine good so that the surrounding metal is 220 degrees. Clamp a quality set of vice grips on to the bolt head, and spray both head and jaws of vice grips with a good burst of freon until things begin to frost up. Wait a few seconds for the "freeze" to transfer to the threads, and back it out.

If that doesn't work, disconnect the battery and then weld a 1/2" nut (thread diameter) to the head of the bolt. You'll be welding inside the threads of the nut. Just tack it and cool it off, tack it and cool it off a few times. Be patient and take your time. Once the nut is sufficiently welded on, yer all set. The freon. trick works to help in this scenario as well.
 

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Hi gang. I went to change my engine oil today, ride a good bit to warm it up, parked, got oil pan and as I grabbed my 12mm socket and box-end wrenches, I found they did not fit easily/well. None the less I continued to try to get them on and thought I had a good fit but upon applying pressure to loosen the bolt the head stripped. This happened several times and I now have a fully stripped bolt head. Any ideas shy of a tap & die? I think I may need to head into the shop to have them deal with this. It really sucks and it super frustrating. Here is a pic of the bolt - its the first of the three located nearest to the front. Thanks! Rob

View attachment 408178
This could of been avoided in the first place by using a quality 6 point socket and a short extension.
Were you even turning it in the right direction?
Lessons learned. :oops::oops:
 

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I have a 2012 and had heard about stripping the final drive fill plug problems. Searched and found a 17mm six point box end wrench. Most metric sockets are six point, never use a 12 point on any bolt on the bike. The metal is softer than SAE bolts.
It's the same as the JIS screws Honda uses. I have replaced most of them with allen head bolts. Less chance of stripping them or dropping them into never, never land.But I do have a set of JIS drivers.
 

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I would be afraid to weld on one without removing all the computers.…..
Man am I glad I read this before it ever happened to me because that’s exactly what I would have done- weld something to the bolt head to allow better bite or leverage with no realization that I might fry the rest of the bike 😬
 
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