GL1800Riders Forums banner

1 - 12 of 12 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
51 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Hey! What the heck! The sun came out today in Buffalo NY. Holy cow, I've slept through the whole winter and now I've got to get going on getting some accessories on my 2002 Wing before the wife and I go on any trips.

Here's a little detail on our riding style so you can help us make decisions.

First, I'm squeeky tight with money, especially now. I don't get into the 'chrome' scene unless it does some function. (Oh boy, I'll bet I get some serious slamming on that comment!).

Second, we take lots of day rides (200 miles) around local towns, we've got a major ride every year, this year we're riding from Buffalo to Santa Fe NM (and back), and probably 2 or 3 times a year we'll take a weekend 3-day trip.

Ok, here's what I've got...

I bought the F4 +4 windshield and the small Baker wings that go under the rear view mirrors. We installed both a couple weeks ago and can't wait to see the difference.
Brand new, Elite 3 tires last fall front and back.
Bushtech 2 (old style) trailer hitch - it's not installed - don't know that I need it.

Here's what I want to buy (I think)

For cold rides, are the foam inserts by the front forks worthwhile?

On our 1995 Voyager XII, my wife had passenger floorboards with the highway pegs that raised up. I'd like to get them for her for the Goldwing but damn! they're expensive. From what I see, there's only one choice.

We need rain gear. I'm thinking the Frog Togs are really lightweight and could store in a small area. Are they ok?

Final accessory (for now) - I'm struggeling on deciding the best 'extra' storage option. I'm not interested in a trailer, probably out of ignorance but I really don't want to be pulling something behind me. I've seen those cooler, bag options. If I did that, I could install the trailer hitch that I have but I've heard that adding weight behind the rear tire changes the dynamics of the bike. You know, weight behind rear tire = less weight on front tire type of thing. The only other option I can think of is a luggage rack. Geesh! I can't believe how many people have complained that the luggage rack cracked the trunk lid, and you can't store anything on top of the rack if it weighs more than a feather pillow. I'm so confused! :shrug:

As you can see, my goal is the best riding comfort for my wife. She loves riding with me so I'm pretty lucky. We went to Rapid City SD on the Voyager a couple years ago and we've just upgraded to the 2002 Wing last fall. Even so, the ride on the Wing is unbelieveable!

We've got Tourmaster jackets that are fantastic too. I'm not a big fan of riding in the rain but last year, on the Voyager, we had to ride all day long in Kentucky in pouring rain. We got soaked, cold, I couldn't see through the shield, Ugh. I've got to prepare better for that type of weather.

Thanks for reading, I'm hoping to get some advice if you don't mind.

Wayne
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,373 Posts
Since you already have the hitch I would install it and buy any number of racks that are available. I had a buddy weld up a rack for about $20.00 in scrap metal, and then added the Nelson-Rigg GWR 1000 bag. The total investment was about $120.00 and it has worked flawlessly. We exceed the MFR weight suggestion without the rack, but you can't tell it's back there.

For rain gear, we used to wear our riding jackets and when it rained, stopped and dug out the rain suits. We were usually wet before we got into them so they were pretty ineffective for us. I bought Olympia riding gear and now only have to take along the waterproof liners. They are comfortable in most weather and waterproof. They save space when packing, extra weight on the bike, and are zippered clear up to the waist (easy on/off)

Got your Butler Mugs??
 

·
UBposting IBchatting
Joined
·
1,018 Posts
On our 1995 Voyager XII, my wife had passenger floorboards with the highway pegs that raised up. I'd like to get them for her for the Goldwing but damn! they're expensive. From what I see, there's only one choice.


Wayne
http://www.directlineparts.com/product.asp?pid=974&str=4 These are the Transformer boards by Kuryakyn that we have on our Wing. If I were going to do it over again, I'd get these instead:
http://www.directlineparts.com/product.asp?pid=5250&str=4

The Kurys' riser arm comes up from the outside of the floorboard, and boxes in my toes. The Wingleaders' arm comes up from the inside, leaving the outside of the board open. I'm sure it's a very slight possibility, but I wonder about getting my foot caught on the Kury riser arm in the case of an unscheduled get-off.
I can lift the riser with my toe on the Kurys, and I don't know if I'd be able to with the Wingleaders' riser. Someone who has them on their bike should be able to answer that for you.

Hope this helps,
Becky
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
801 Posts
I've had bad luck with Frog Togs. Some people like them; but not me. We've now got the Tourmaster Sentinal pants and jackets and REALLY like them. Not a drop gets through.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,571 Posts
We have the Wingleaders. You have to put them up before you start riding. We have the Kury backrest so these helped her legs get up higher and not rubb her inner thighs. We had that unplanned dimount and they let her fly right off the bike without trapping her foot. Frogg Toggs are at best okay. They do keep you dry and maske a good rarly morning warm suit to wear. They melt real easy if you touch a hot muffler.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,179 Posts
We have the Wingleader boards for Gwyn. Why I like them:

1. The peg faces away from the bike, no fear of her foot getting caught
2. They use all existing hardware except longer bolts which they supply
3. They come with an off-set spacer that allows for height adjustment
4. They are heavy! No cheap material here.
5. They fold down nearly flat and aren't an eye sore
6. Even a Twyn wth 10 thumbs can do the install
7. They are cheaper than others
8. Gwyn can lay her ankle/lower calf on them and I don't feel her touching me
9. I like them because she likes them.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,849 Posts
. . . Bushtech 2 (old style) trailer hitch - it's not installed - don't know that I need it. . .

. . . I'm struggeling on deciding the best 'extra' storage option. I'm not interested in a trailer, probably out of ignorance but I really don't want to be pulling something behind me. I've seen those cooler, bag options. If I did that, I could install the trailer hitch that I have but I've heard that adding weight behind the rear tire changes the dynamics of the bike. You know, weight behind rear tire = less weight on front tire type of thing.
Rivco has a great carrier rack holder that installs without a trailer hitch. http://www.wingstuff.com/pgroup_detail/105_Rivco_Products/2952_Rivco_GL1800_Cooler_Rack_System/?goto=/pgroup_list/gl1800/105_Rivco_Products/ You will need to decide on the size of rack and luggage bag you want. You needn't be concerned about handling dynamics. I've used mine several times and don't even know it's there with my luggage bag fully loaded.

The only other option I can think of is a luggage rack. Geesh! I can't believe how many people have complained that the luggage rack cracked the trunk lid, and you can't store anything on top of the rack if it weighs more than a feather pillow. I'm so confused! :shrug:
The OEM Honda rack is small and was designed for the GL1800 trunk top. True -- you shouldn't put a lot of weight on the rack, but with star washers under the rack legs to better distribute the weight, you can safely put 10-12 lbs up there without worry. That's the best place to put your light things like maps, cell phone and rain gear anyway.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
51 Posts
Discussion Starter #8
Thanks Becky!

Wow, you just saved me a hundred bucks! I looked at the two comparisons you posted and I agree, we'll order the less costly ones.

Thanks again,

Wayne
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,535 Posts
Raingear -- Walmart $17 a set
Headlight Modulator
Tail light modulator
FOG lights
Speedohealer
Heated grips
rear speakers

Some major factors in terms of safety and comfort. (In that order)

I would also suggest looking at the Diamond passenger backrest. Does away with the lumbar support that is so very uncomfortable.

The BIGGEST SINGLE UPGRADE would be the Traxxion Suspension. WELL WORTH the money. I am not aware of 1 single person who puts on good miles who does not either have or want the Traxxion setup. You wil not understand until you put a few miles on a bike with it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
800 Posts
We use the Rivco rack and bag as mentioned above, I can't tell it's back there. Tourmaster Sentinel rainsuits are very dry.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
16 Posts
if its got wheels, it's going to cost money.

Here's what I want to buy (I think)

For cold rides, are the foam inserts by the front forks worthwhile?

This should save you a few bucks in regard to those tunnel fillers. ( It should open to size required for a templet when printed.) It will help a little in regard to rain and bugs. I actually found that the kury dragonwings make the most differance in regard to wind protection and controlling heat for the driver.

1800tunnelfillers.jpg
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
250 Posts
Wayne: If you haven't already discovered, I think you'll be happy with the under-mirror Baker Hand-Wings you said you got. Unlike the almost-similar Tulsa air-wings, the Bakers are adjustable "open or closed", whereas the Tulsa air wings are fixed and non-adjustable. The Bakers will keep lots of air off your own hands & forearms, and will primarily aid in reducing wind-buffeting on your passenger Karen. The Baker's will also put lots more cooling air in your own face on the hot days when you adjust them for that purpose.

As far as your mentioning tunnel fillers for when it's cold? Can't 1st-hand comment on them because I've never used 'em, and wouldn't. My reasoning may be silly to some, but I cringe at even just the notion of putting anything in the fork-tunnel area where, should it get dislodged out of place, might even conceivably risk restricting or impeding front fork arc-of-travel-motion to any degree whatsoever when needed. That's just a "personal idiosyncracy" of mine concerning a product I admittedly have zero personal familiarity with. I just don't even like "the concept". YMMV.

Noting you apparently live in NY and mentioned "cold riding", my strongest suggestion for anything to do with "the cold" would be to get Gerbing heated clothing. Yes a tad pricey, but once ya use 'em I don't think you'd ever go back to riding in the cold without 'em. Once I broke down and made the splurge, I was kicking myself in the butt for not having done so, like, 38 years sooner.

Don't bother with a heated vest. Get the full-sleeved jacket liner. The wonderful thing about the Gerbing liner is that you can "layer" your cold-weather clothing and dispense with your Tourmaster jacket's cold-weather zip-in liner . . . and use the Gerbing heated jacket liner instead. Get 3X the warmth without looking like the over-stuffed "Michelin Man". Nice thing is you can still use lighter jackets over the Gerbing and still stay toasty warm. If-when it's cold enough to be using the Gerbing, I'll crank the portable heat controller up full blast when I first take off, and within 5 minutes I'll be lowering the temp setting down when I start getting "too warm".

I haven't bothered to install a permanent Gerbing hookup heat controller in the Tupperware because I have a hinged mid-back-height Kury driver's backrest (a clone of the Khrome Werks and Drag Specialties models). The flat side-plate mounting brackets for the backrest (bolted on via the seat's grab-rail handle mounting bolts) makes the perfect location to mount the Gerbing portable heat controller on via it's belt-clip-equipped pouch cover. I just reach down with the left hand and the temp controller knob is right there, in perfectly-easy reach.

Especially in regard to your comment re being lucky that Karen loves to ride with ya, get her a Gerbing jacket liner and she'll love riding with ya 10X more - even when it's very cold out. And so would you. Gerbing's stuff is well-made and versatile. If ya wanno go whole-hog, jacket liner can plug into pants, which pants can in turn plug into socks. Sleeves of jacket liners have connector plugs in little zippered cuff-pockets that can connect to heated gloves. Even the standard Gerbing gloves are very comfy, and I imagine the gel-filled G3 variant gloves would be even more cushy. The GL1800 alternator has more than enough outpout to handle two full sets of Gerbing gear with no problems. (Presuming you don't have a gazillion other electrical accessories sucking up power).

My new '09 GW has the comfort package with heated grips, but I'm not too impressed by them, nor by the heated seats. Never could see the sense in trying to heat skin through my clothing, as opoosed to having heated clothing itself that's closer to my skin. For example, heating the palms of my hands via the grips and through a pair of gloves. The airstream hits the outer surface of hands and fingers more than the palm side. I know many will "swear by" heated grips and seat, and I will concede, "to each their own", but that just kinda seems like a "Duh" factor to me as compared to plug-in heated clothing, efficiency-wise and heat-wise. Hell, I can even wear a Gerbing 12-volt waist belt battery-pack if I wanna go tramping through the snowy forest on foot and go ice-fishing on a frozen lake for a coupla hours . . . If I know I'm gonna be taking the Wing into the real high altitudes or real cold temps, I'll still bring the Gerbing gloves along, regardless of my semi-useless OEM heated grips.

Can't 1st-hand comment on behind-the-wheel rear storage racks, but I am seriously debating Pack-It Rack (or similar) vs rear trunk luggage rack. Pack-It makes a model that does not need a trailer hitch - it attaches to the saddlebag sub-frame instead - and is quickly removable when not needed. I kinda like that versatility.

Fred Harmon authored a truly well-thought and excellent long-distance-travel-usage writeup report in this forum on his Pack-It Rack, and it pretty much sold me. I think I'll probably end up going for a rear-of-wheel rack rather than a trunk lid rack.

I had the Kury flat trunk lid rack on both prior '01 and '03 Wings I had, and never had any trunk lid cracking problems at all throughout four east-west coast-coast cross-country trips averaging 7 and 8 thousand RT miles apiece. Even without any large rubber & metal "star washers" for mounting. The Kury rack bolted only through the outer trunk lid, not the outer and inner panels. Some model trunk lid racks mount through both outer and inner trunk lid panels and there is some space between the two panels at the rack mounting leg areas. I suspect many lid crack problems may be caused by not adding filler washers or other filler material between the two lid panels when installing, with overtightening of mounting bolts compressing the outer trunk lid panel enough to eventially stress-crack the outer lid. Or, perhaps, overloading the trunk lid rack with excess weight.

The Kury luggage rack bag designed for their own rack was a little inconvenient because its top zipper is centrally located across the top of the bag and doesn't open very widely - as compared to the overall dimensions of the bag - so it ain't the easiest thing to load and unload gear into. On my LD trips, I found it useful primarily for (and only for) storing my Tourmaster riding jacket when not worn, thereby freeing up a lot of bulk-space in the trunk, saddlebags and rear seat-bag. The weght capacity limit on the trunk lid rack is very low. So low that I think a Pack-It (or similar style) rack behind the rear wheel would afford more capacity. As stated, easily removeable when not needed seems real handy and a highly desireable "bonus" to me, too.

Good luck and best wishes for your upcoming travels.
 
1 - 12 of 12 Posts
Top