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Discussion Starter #1
So I am a total newbie to motorcycle trailers. However after doing a little research, I am contemplating on purchasing a Bushtec for my 2018 Goldwing this year. I am thinking that I would purchase it while at wing ding this year and just have them install the hitch and the wiring right there. For those of you that own Bushtec's have you had any issues that I should be aware of? On a side note, I am intrigued by the Can Am RT622 trailer but I don't believe that they make a swivel type hitch for that trailer.

Thanks

Craig
 

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According to the specs. the can am trailer is 100lbs heavier and 6” wider than the bushtec. The can am is sized better for a trike. B.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
According to the specs. the can am trailer is 100lbs heavier and 6” wider than the bushtec. The can am is sized better for a trike. B.
That makes a lot of sense. Naturally you see more Can Am Spyders pulling those trailers.
 

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Not totally germane to the OPs question, I find potholes to be the biggest problem with the trailer. Without the trailer, no problem navigation around a pothole. But with the Hannigan trailer behind the bike, if I navigate around the pothole with the bike, the trailer has two wheels that invariably find the pothole.

In other words you can't straddle a pothole with a trailer without, it seems to me, having one wheel find the opening.

I guess its like riding a trike, with three points of contact not in a line.
 

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The only problems I've had with my Bushtec is the shocks loosing air below 50 degrees, I did replace them, and having to replace the bushings on the torsion bars, but my trailer is 28 years old. I still love it and it still pulls straight and great.
 

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I really like my Bushtec. The only problem I have had in the last 5 years was the tire stem going bad. Trailer towed easily and true.
 

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365525


1995 bushy, still going strong.
 

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Bushtec makes a fantastic trailer. My Bushtec is two years old, and painted to match my 2018 Gold Wing Tour Air Bag Model. I also have the Electrical Connection air compressor mounted inside the trailer. I have had absolutely no problems with my bushtec in over 20,000 miles of towing.
 

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The only issue I have had is not getting out on the road more often:cautious:
 

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So I am a total newbie to motorcycle trailers. However after doing a little research, I am contemplating on purchasing a Bushtec for my 2018 Goldwing this year. I am thinking that I would purchase it while at wing ding this year and just have them install the hitch and the wiring right there. For those of you that own Bushtec's have you had any issues that I should be aware of? On a side note, I am intrigued by the Can Am RT622 trailer but I don't believe that they make a swivel type hitch for that trailer.

Thanks

Craig
I like my 2002 Bushtec!!! The only two problems that I have are replacing tires and not getting it out on the road more. ;)
 

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I have had to bushtec Turbo (original) and a Turbo2 trailers. I am new to the Gold wing, but have towed about 50,000 miles on my Yamaha FJR 1300 2up through just about everything imaginable. Been to Alaska 3 times and done about 750 miles of gravel roads combined on those trips.

Loading is important, need to get the right tongue weight.

The first trailer I bought used was a 1992 model and put about 35,000 miles on it. Great trailer, had to replace the air shocks and tubing once. I converted it to tubeless tires because that is easier to deal with on the road for a flat then, then tubes. But I carried a spare tube just in case. ALWAYS carry spare wheel bearings and tools to replace if you are traveling remote or a complete spare wheel.

here is the first trailer in 2016 loaded for 17 days in Alaska in one of the many 10 mile long gravel road repair project: (this trailer also made the 3rd trip - I sold it to a friend who towed it with a Honda ST1300)
365976


Here is the 2018 Turbo 2 on the 2018 18 days trip to Alaska.

NOTE: My Turbo 2 has been modified to carry the spare at the back. I have since removed that because it caused the trailer to be unstable with all the air it catches. I also added a different cooler carrier so we could take the a larger cooler similar to a YETI cooler and to be bear proof. The wheels and tires are from a Yakima Rack and Roll trailer. They are cheaper then the bustec set up. You do have to do some mods to the wheel to fit properly, but that is simple to do.

In the picture below, the trailer is loaded to about 400 lbs. Spare tires (front and rear) under the cover on the on top. I used the bungie to keep the cover from flapping in the wind and rock straps to keep them in place.

365977


Both trailers had excessive tow in close to 1/2 inch which caused excessive tire wear. I measured and then adjusted the tow in to be 1/8" at most. My old trailer made the 7500 mile trip with hardly and tire wear, and my new one wore out a set of tires in 2500 miles before I caught the issue and corrected it. Also in a pinch in Alaska, you can fit a Harley 16" front tire on the Yakima wheels because they are an inch wider in the rim area.

I highly recommend these trailers, IMHO they are the best, since Dauntless quit making trailers. The air suspension is fantastic. If trailer hits a pothole it will not transmit the force back through the tongue to the bike. Both trailers have seen well in excess of 100 mph. They are great. It does take some getting used to when playing in the twisty roads. On the FJR you brake and as you transition to the throttle to accelerate out of the corner, the mass will push you, not excessive, but you will notice it. If you want to pass, you will need to downshift depending on the distance and your momentum. Your breaking distances obviously will increase and there are no trailer brakes on these. Don't cheap out, get the wiring isolation kit from bushtech and the trailer pin & ball because the trailer connects with a 3/4" hiem joint.

Lastly, the suspension the bike needs to be set up properly. On the FJR it has a Penski Shock/Spring and re-valved front forks with heavier springs to properly carry the load. On my Wing, I am updating the rear shock and putting a heavier spring on to properly carry the load on the trailer tongue weight and putting in progressive front cartridges and springs. Because mine has the heavier ice chest on it, the tongue weight is in the 50-60 lb range.

The thing I love about it most is we can stop and camp anywhere we want to. We are not chasing hotel reservations. We can be on the coast in the morning, pick up fresh seafood for dinner, and be camping in Montana that night grilling fresh seafood.

here is shot of a couple that has done all of the Alaska trips and this one to the grand canyon, national parks in Utah, Yellowstone and Tetons. This is near the southeast end of the Grand Canyon in October 2012. to illustrate how stable they corner. The have a sway bar built into them. And we were poking along pretty good here.
365981
 

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I have had to bushtec Turbo (original) and a Turbo2 trailers. I am new to the Gold wing, but have towed about 50,000 miles on my Yamaha FJR 1300 2up through just about everything imaginable. Been to Alaska 3 times and done about 750 miles of gravel roads combined on those trips.

Loading is important, need to get the right tongue weight.

The first trailer I bought used was a 1992 model and put about 35,000 miles on it. Great trailer, had to replace the air shocks and tubing once. I converted it to tubeless tires because that is easier to deal with on the road for a flat then, then tubes. But I carried a spare tube just in case. ALWAYS carry spare wheel bearings and tools to replace if you are traveling remote or a complete spare wheel.

here is the first trailer in 2016 loaded for 17 days in Alaska in one of the many 10 mile long gravel road repair project: (this trailer also made the 3rd trip - I sold it to a friend who towed it with a Honda ST1300)
View attachment 365976

Here is the 2018 Turbo 2 on the 2018 18 days trip to Alaska.

NOTE: My Turbo 2 has been modified to carry the spare at the back. I have since removed that because it caused the trailer to be unstable with all the air it catches. I also added a different cooler carrier so we could take the a larger cooler similar to a YETI cooler and to be bear proof. The wheels and tires are from a Yakima Rack and Roll trailer. They are cheaper then the bustec set up. You do have to do some mods to the wheel to fit properly, but that is simple to do.

In the picture below, the trailer is loaded to about 400 lbs. Spare tires (front and rear) under the cover on the on top. I used the bungie to keep the cover from flapping in the wind and rock straps to keep them in place.

View attachment 365977

Both trailers had excessive tow in close to 1/2 inch which caused excessive tire wear. I measured and then adjusted the tow in to be 1/8" at most. My old trailer made the 7500 mile trip with hardly and tire wear, and my new one wore out a set of tires in 2500 miles before I caught the issue and corrected it. Also in a pinch in Alaska, you can fit a Harley 16" front tire on the Yakima wheels because they are an inch wider in the rim area.

I highly recommend these trailers, IMHO they are the best, since Dauntless quit making trailers. The air suspension is fantastic. If trailer hits a pothole it will not transmit the force back through the tongue to the bike. Both trailers have seen well in excess of 100 mph. They are great. It does take some getting used to when playing in the twisty roads. On the FJR you brake and as you transition to the throttle to accelerate out of the corner, the mass will push you, not excessive, but you will notice it. If you want to pass, you will need to downshift depending on the distance and your momentum. Your breaking distances obviously will increase and there are no trailer brakes on these. Don't cheap out, get the wiring isolation kit from bushtech and the trailer pin & ball because the trailer connects with a 3/4" hiem joint.

Lastly, the suspension the bike needs to be set up properly. On the FJR it has a Penski Shock/Spring and re-valved front forks with heavier springs to properly carry the load. On my Wing, I am updating the rear shock and putting a heavier spring on to properly carry the load on the trailer tongue weight and putting in progressive front cartridges and springs. Because mine has the heavier ice chest on it, the tongue weight is in the 50-60 lb range.

The thing I love about it most is we can stop and camp anywhere we want to. We are not chasing hotel reservations. We can be on the coast in the morning, pick up fresh seafood for dinner, and be camping in Montana that night grilling fresh seafood.

here is shot of a couple that has done all of the Alaska trips and this one to the grand canyon, national parks in Utah, Yellowstone and Tetons. This is near the southeast end of the Grand Canyon in October 2012. to illustrate how stable they corner. The have a sway bar built into them. And we were poking along pretty good here.
View attachment 365981
@AuburnFJR
Very nice and informative write up. Thanks for sharing and looking forward to your post in the future! Ride Safe and enjoy the miles as they roll bye-bye!
 

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I have had to bushtec Turbo (original) and a Turbo2 trailers. I am new to the Gold wing, but have towed about 50,000 miles on my Yamaha FJR 1300 2up through just about everything imaginable. Been to Alaska 3 times and done about 750 miles of gravel roads combined on those trips.

Loading is important, need to get the right tongue weight.

The first trailer I bought used was a 1992 model and put about 35,000 miles on it. Great trailer, had to replace the air shocks and tubing once. I converted it to tubeless tires because that is easier to deal with on the road for a flat then, then tubes. But I carried a spare tube just in case. ALWAYS carry spare wheel bearings and tools to replace if you are traveling remote or a complete spare wheel.

here is the first trailer in 2016 loaded for 17 days in Alaska in one of the many 10 mile long gravel road repair project: (this trailer also made the 3rd trip - I sold it to a friend who towed it with a Honda ST1300)
View attachment 365976

Here is the 2018 Turbo 2 on the 2018 18 days trip to Alaska.

NOTE: My Turbo 2 has been modified to carry the spare at the back. I have since removed that because it caused the trailer to be unstable with all the air it catches. I also added a different cooler carrier so we could take the a larger cooler similar to a YETI cooler and to be bear proof. The wheels and tires are from a Yakima Rack and Roll trailer. They are cheaper then the bustec set up. You do have to do some mods to the wheel to fit properly, but that is simple to do.

In the picture below, the trailer is loaded to about 400 lbs. Spare tires (front and rear) under the cover on the on top. I used the bungie to keep the cover from flapping in the wind and rock straps to keep them in place.

View attachment 365977

Both trailers had excessive tow in close to 1/2 inch which caused excessive tire wear. I measured and then adjusted the tow in to be 1/8" at most. My old trailer made the 7500 mile trip with hardly and tire wear, and my new one wore out a set of tires in 2500 miles before I caught the issue and corrected it. Also in a pinch in Alaska, you can fit a Harley 16" front tire on the Yakima wheels because they are an inch wider in the rim area.

I highly recommend these trailers, IMHO they are the best, since Dauntless quit making trailers. The air suspension is fantastic. If trailer hits a pothole it will not transmit the force back through the tongue to the bike. Both trailers have seen well in excess of 100 mph. They are great. It does take some getting used to when playing in the twisty roads. On the FJR you brake and as you transition to the throttle to accelerate out of the corner, the mass will push you, not excessive, but you will notice it. If you want to pass, you will need to downshift depending on the distance and your momentum. Your breaking distances obviously will increase and there are no trailer brakes on these. Don't cheap out, get the wiring isolation kit from bushtech and the trailer pin & ball because the trailer connects with a 3/4" hiem joint.

Lastly, the suspension the bike needs to be set up properly. On the FJR it has a Penski Shock/Spring and re-valved front forks with heavier springs to properly carry the load. On my Wing, I am updating the rear shock and putting a heavier spring on to properly carry the load on the trailer tongue weight and putting in progressive front cartridges and springs. Because mine has the heavier ice chest on it, the tongue weight is in the 50-60 lb range.

The thing I love about it most is we can stop and camp anywhere we want to. We are not chasing hotel reservations. We can be on the coast in the morning, pick up fresh seafood for dinner, and be camping in Montana that night grilling fresh seafood.

here is shot of a couple that has done all of the Alaska trips and this one to the grand canyon, national parks in Utah, Yellowstone and Tetons. This is near the southeast end of the Grand Canyon in October 2012. to illustrate how stable they corner. The have a sway bar built into them. And we were poking along pretty good here.
View attachment 365981
Thanks for taking the time to post that!

A couple of questions. Could you describe what you call "toe in" a little better or differently? I am new to my bushtec (quantum sport) and was told by the prior owner, "when the air in the shocks is adjusted properly for the load, the top or the tire will ever so slightly be leaning out away from the trailer and will be slightly visible in your rear mirror." It seams to me, you would want the tires to run as close to vertical as possible

What exactly is the way to be sure to eliminate the rapid tire wear you described and how would I know if the tire has your recommended 1/8 inch toe in?

Thanks in advance!
 

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Thanks for taking the time to post that!

A couple of questions. Could you describe what you call "toe in" a little better or differently? I am new to my bushtec (quantum sport) and was told by the prior owner, "when the air in the shocks is adjusted properly for the load, the top or the tire will ever so slightly be leaning out away from the trailer and will be slightly visible in your rear mirror." It seams to me, you would want the tires to run as close to vertical as possible

What exactly is the way to be sure to eliminate the rapid tire wear you described and how would I know if the tire has your recommended 1/8 inch toe in?

Thanks in advance!
Toe in the same as on a car, the wheels are not actually parallel to each other. I set mine to between 1/8" and 0 for toe in.

The easiest way to check is to fill the air shocks up so they are fully extended, then put the trailer upside down (if you don't have the stand for it). I mark a spot on the each wheel so I can measure between those 2 points at the front then rotate the wheels 180 degrees to the rear and remeasure. Check to see what the difference is. If the front is less than the rear you are towed in. Now check from the wheel to the same fixed point on the frame ( I use the 1" square tube running underneath) to see which side is out or if they both are. There is not nut or bolt to adjust, you have to tweak the axle to make adjustments. Remove whichever wheel (or both) put a pipe over the axle and tweak it to change the toe in alignment. (hopefully this makes sense). Put the wheels back on and check and repeat as needed. It usually take three to four times to get them set. DO NOT use any heat on the axles. You don't want to affect the structural strength.
 

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Toe in the same as on a car, the wheels are not actually parallel to each other. I set mine to between 1/8" and 0 for toe in.

The easiest way to check is to fill the air shocks up so they are fully extended, then put the trailer upside down (if you don't have the stand for it). I mark a spot on the each wheel so I can measure between those 2 points at the front then rotate the wheels 180 degrees to the rear and remeasure. Check to see what the difference is. If the front is less than the rear you are towed in. Now check from the wheel to the same fixed point on the frame ( I use the 1" square tube running underneath) to see which side is out or if they both are. There is not nut or bolt to adjust, you have to tweak the axle to make adjustments. Remove whichever wheel (or both) put a pipe over the axle and tweak it to change the toe in alignment. (hopefully this makes sense). Put the wheels back on and check and repeat as needed. It usually take three to four times to get them set. DO NOT use any heat on the axles. You don't want to affect the structural strength.
Yes, that makes perfect sense. Thank you.

What is your opinion of what I described about the top of the tire slightly leaning out from the trailer. Is that what you look for?

By the way.....I made the run to AK and back solo about 10 years ago on a GS but going with a group like you have pictured must have been a blast! Envious!
 

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Yes, that makes perfect sense. Thank you.

What is your opinion of what I described about the top of the tire slightly leaning out from the trailer. Is that what you look for?

By the way.....I made the run to AK and back solo about 10 years ago on a GS but going with a group like you have pictured must have been a blast! Envious!
The proper amount of air in the shocks is when the trailer is loaded, the tires should cant out at the top about 1./2 the tire width. This allows the shocks to carry the load and soak up bumps. Theoretically, since the shocks are connected via the air line, they should each share the load equally and the sway bar will act to keep the load balanced.

The ride up there is so amazing and the scenery is unreal. If anyone is on doubt, find a way to go. You will not be disappointed. It is mind blowing the vastness of Alaska. We go the last week of May, usually leaving the Thursday be fore Memorial Day and come back around the 10th of June. Two things work in your favor, #1 it is statistically the driest time of the year in Alaska with expected rainfall to average less that and 1/4 inch per day if it rains. #2, the days are getting very long, so it is easy to travel longer days if you need to. Lastly, the passes are usually all open. The Top of the World Hwy only opened a few days before we traveled over it on the 1st of June in 2018.

On all three trips we primarily tent camped. Usually try to get a RV campground so we have access to showers and power to recharge electrnics and, wifi to communicate to family. I also carry a spot tracker for people to follow as we go. My co-workers love to see where we are and could zoom in on the aerial maps to see the terrain.

Each trip we saw many GS's on the road. I know many who have done the trip solo because their riding partners and others in the group all cancelled last minute mostly because they realized how far and long they would be riding. Their loss.
 

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I went the last week of May too but had to hole up a day in a freak snow storm in Wyoming. Another advantage of that time of year is dramatically less mosquitoes, especially if you camp, which I did.

I met a guy riding a Harley on the Alcan one evening in a bar and we rode and camped together several days until we got to Haines. He was just trying to bag his 50th state so when I headed for Anchorage, he jumped on the ferry and went south.

One thing about a solo trip up the Alcan......you are never alone because you play leapfrog with the same people over and over at every landmark and see them at the campgrounds every night. It’s like hiking the Appalachian trail.

Once I got to Anchorage my wife flew up to meet me for a week then flew home and I rode down to Haines and caught the ferry to Bellingham. Then back across to Maryland, where I started.
 

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I'm on my 3rd Bushtec since 1989, I like it, a lot. I wish I had the electrical connection air pump installed, rode from Wa State to Knoxville to have it installed, long story short it didn't happen. Mine has been all over the country, on 4 or 5 Iron Butt Saddle Sore 1000s, makes going to Costco more fun too.
 

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