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Discussion Starter #1
There are so many different units available and I don't want to spend any more than I have to as I am very cheap (translate poor). I see plug and play without isolation. Is anyone running these without any problems to their electrical system....e.g. blown fuses, melted wires, etc. As far as the isolation units are concerened, I see them offered from $30 to over $150. Why the big variable in cost? Thanks for your help.
 

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Same reply as other forum.

If you think you're poor now, just wait until you burn up some wiring in your bike because you didn't have an isolator.
Get the one from Electical Connection. Good deal. No worries.
 

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biglefti said:
I see plug and play without isolation
I guess I'd like to know what you're looking at? These are plug and play with isolation. You need 07660 and 07662. If your trailer is 4-wire, then you need a converter. EC makes one that's plug and play, 07664.

Sorry that you don't have funds, however you may be more sorry if you cheap out on electrics.

http://www.electricalconnection.com/wire-harnesses/hrns-trailer.htm
 

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Spend the dollars! Went through large puddle (small lake) during downpour in central FL, towing my harbor freight in June. My left tail light bracket broke due to corrosion and the tail light was ripped off. When it went it shorted the wires together. Only problem was a blown 30 amp fuse on the isolater. Bike wire and fuses were just fine.
 

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Mostly used regular wiring on my bikes, but I put a Bushtec hitch on the GL1800. Came with isolator plug and play. Lights were much brighter.

I would heartily recommend the isolator, but you can use a Hoppy convertor for much less money that will do the same thing. You will have to wire into existing light system, but the power for the trailer will come straight from the battery.

More info on my sig line link. Click there.
 

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The Tailwind has a very robust (30 amps each) six relay isolator in its Electrical Bay.

I had a plug and play isolator in 2001 on my first GL 1800. Always built my own isolators before that. The purchased isolator was used with a Hannigan Europa trailer. Three of these isolators failed, each in about 10,000 miles and all failed in the same way, the stop light relay welded shut and each time the brake lights remained on without my knowledge which is very dangerous as the driver behind does not know you are going to stop.

I finally made my own for the Hannigan and had no more problems. The relays we use are called "Headlight relays" and are very common in the automotive industry. they plug into a socket which makes them easy to replace. However, I have never had one fail.

You will find the Tailwind has quite bright taillights and the lights do not dim when the brake light is actuated. The system runs from a 12 gage loop direct from the bikes battery.

The system also has a remote battery (Gel Cel) in the Trailer's electrical bay that automatically charges on line when riding and drops off line to power the trailer only when the bike is shut down or disconncted.

This is a six wire system, Two wires must be 12 gage, the other four can be cat 5 wire or anything at all.

Making your own isolator with these robust relays is not hard, just time consuming.

Plug and play isolators do protect the bike and will likely not fail as often when not driving large filiment stop lights. They are compatible with the Tailwind system as long as the two 30 amp 12 gage wires are used between the battery and the trailer plug. The positive 12 gage lead is always fused at the battery positive terminal to avoid damage caused by an unprotected wire.

In any wiring added to the bike, make sure the lead between the 12 volt source and the fuse is the shortest possible and make sure the fuse can be accessed by simply removing the side cover, and not the seat.

One more thing, fuses that are the kind that glow when popped will carry enough current to drive a voltmeter and can cause considerable confusion to the novice when shooting trouble with the voltmeter or LED test light.

One of our trailer customers had that very experience.
 
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I used a Rivco and was very pleased with the price ($65.00 total), quality, installation instructions with photographs, ease of installation (it has EVERYTHING you need to hook up your trailer to your 1800; nothing else to purchase or hook up) and performance.

Here is a photo of the isolator:


Here is a link to Rivco's page detailing it: http://saturn.dnsprotect.com/~rivcopro/ ... 255&page=2

And below is a photo of the isolator mounted on my 1800. Rivco placed double stick tape on the back of the isolator so all I had to do was peel the backing off the tape and stick it to the underside of the bottom of the CD/CB area of the trunk.



Another closer photo of the isolator
 

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Discussion Starter #8
I think I will follow your lead on this and build my own isolation unit. I assume you bought the headlight relays at your local auto parts store. Thanks for your input.



Tom Finch said:
The Tailwind has a very robust (30 amps each) six relay isolator in its Electrical Bay.

I had a plug and play isolator in 2001 on my first GL 1800. Always built my own isolators before that. The purchased isolator was used with a Hannigan Europa trailer. Three of these isolators failed, each in about 10,000 miles and all failed in the same way, the stop light relay welded shut and each time the brake lights remained on without my knowledge which is very dangerous as the driver behind does not know you are going to stop.

I finally made my own for the Hannigan and had no more problems. The relays we use are called "Headlight relays" and are very common in the automotive industry. they plug into a socket which makes them easy to replace. However, I have never had one fail.

You will find the Tailwind has quite bright taillights and the lights do not dim when the brake light is actuated. The system runs from a 12 gage loop direct from the bikes battery.

The system also has a remote battery (Gel Cel) in the Trailer's electrical bay that automatically charges on line when riding and drops off line to power the trailer only when the bike is shut down or disconncted.

This is a six wire system, Two wires must be 12 gage, the other four can be cat 5 wire or anything at all.

Making your own isolator with these robust relays is not hard, just time consuming.

Plug and play isolators do protect the bike and will likely not fail as often when not driving large filiment stop lights. They are compatible with the Tailwind system as long as the two 30 amp 12 gage wires are used between the battery and the trailer plug. The positive 12 gage lead is always fused at the battery positive terminal to avoid damage caused by an unprotected wire.

In any wiring added to the bike, make sure the lead between the 12 volt source and the fuse is the shortest possible and make sure the fuse can be accessed by simply removing the side cover, and not the seat.

One more thing, fuses that are the kind that glow when popped will carry enough current to drive a voltmeter and can cause considerable confusion to the novice when shooting trouble with the voltmeter or LED test light.

One of our trailer customers had that very experience.
 

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biglefti
When I was building the isolators individually, I bought them at various autoparts stores.

We buy them by the 100s in production.

Of course, they are not micro sized and could not easily be stuffed under the back fender of the bike.



In the upper photo, you can see some of these relays to the left of and below the 12 volt outlet. Also in this system, auto reset circuit breakers are used to protect the wiring. The Tailwind E Bay is large behind the rear bulkhead. The lower photo was of an earlier Tailwind before the 12 volt outlet and illuminated rocker switch were available.

Be sure that all wiring in your setup is protected by fuses or circuit breakers, to avoid a fire or damaged wiring. Also, ensure that you can easily get to all fuses that you install.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Thanks for the pics. That is a relay that I used to add a couple of systems on my Nomad. Also thanks for the words of caution. I used to be an electrician so am aware of the proper need of system protection and wiring methods.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Thanks again Tom for the useful information. I went ahead and built my own isolation unit and it works great. I supplied it with a 30 amp 10AWG feed from the battery and fed that to 4 fused 10 amp relay circuts. Works great. I also hooked the trailer wire connection like you did in the lower trunk panel. Thanks again.



Tom Finch said:
The Tailwind has a very robust (30 amps each) six relay isolator in its Electrical Bay.

I had a plug and play isolator in 2001 on my first GL 1800. Always built my own isolators before that. The purchased isolator was used with a Hannigan Europa trailer. Three of these isolators failed, each in about 10,000 miles and all failed in the same way, the stop light relay welded shut and each time the brake lights remained on without my knowledge which is very dangerous as the driver behind does not know you are going to stop.

I finally made my own for the Hannigan and had no more problems. The relays we use are called "Headlight relays" and are very common in the automotive industry. they plug into a socket which makes them easy to replace. However, I have never had one fail.

You will find the Tailwind has quite bright taillights and the lights do not dim when the brake light is actuated. The system runs from a 12 gage loop direct from the bikes battery.

The system also has a remote battery (Gel Cel) in the Trailer's electrical bay that automatically charges on line when riding and drops off line to power the trailer only when the bike is shut down or disconncted.

This is a six wire system, Two wires must be 12 gage, the other four can be cat 5 wire or anything at all.

Making your own isolator with these robust relays is not hard, just time consuming.

Plug and play isolators do protect the bike and will likely not fail as often when not driving large filiment stop lights. They are compatible with the Tailwind system as long as the two 30 amp 12 gage wires are used between the battery and the trailer plug. The positive 12 gage lead is always fused at the battery positive terminal to avoid damage caused by an unprotected wire.

In any wiring added to the bike, make sure the lead between the 12 volt source and the fuse is the shortest possible and make sure the fuse can be accessed by simply removing the side cover, and not the seat.

One more thing, fuses that are the kind that glow when popped will carry enough current to drive a voltmeter and can cause considerable confusion to the novice when shooting trouble with the voltmeter or LED test light.

One of our trailer customers had that very experience.
 

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Biglefti
Glad it worked out. Relative to the installation in the bottom of the trunk panel, it was Andy Pearson's installation and idea which I will adopt.

Being a good minister is just one of Andy's many talents. He runs a mean set of tools also, and rides with the best. Of course, I have an idea that his co-rider and great wife and companion, Sally, is where much of it eminates from. An outstanding couple that we in the motorcycling community are lucky enough to have.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
OK Tom, I thanks Andy too!
 
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