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Fred H said:
My wife and I had an interesting conversation about this tonight. My thoughts are this:

Everything that is fun in life brings some risks with it. Be it rock climbing, or scuba diving, or riding a bicycle, or traveling, or you name it. You basically have two options as I see it. You can get out and enjoy life and do what makes you happy and try to minimize the risks, or you can stay at home and read books and never go out, and pray an airplane doesn't crash into your house and kill you.

I am sure Steve is glad he rides, and I know it has brought him lots of enjoyment and taken him to some spectacular places. I suspect he wouldn't trade a minute of it, I know I wouldn't. Life is to be lived. Yes, motorcycles bring risks, and you may get killed on one someday, but your other options are do what? Take up finger painting? Personally, I get far too much enjoyment out of riding to give it up, and while I will do everything I can to minimize the risks, I won't stop riding. Motorcycles have taken me to places like Yellowstone and Yosemite, Glacier , Death Valley, and even to Australia and New Zealand and several other continents. I can't image what my life would be like without those experiences in it. My motorcycle is my key to freedom and adventure and I don't know what I would do without it.
We've all at least thought about it lately, right? Who hasn't had the talk with their wife recently?
What if it was me that time and not Dan or Steve? What do I do? Is the ride worth it?
I agree with Fred. I find a peace when I ride that I can't get anywhere else, not even my Cooper. It's especially special since my wife shares it with me; we go everywhere on that bike together.
What then? How do I mitigate the risks and still have a good time?
I practice my skills, take that first aid class, check my tires, wear good gear.
Yesterday I had Max & Mike at Traxxion do the rear shock on my bike; I knew the old unit was worn out and I had been putting off the repair --- not the smartest thing. The bike handles like a dream now and I know I'll be a safer rider.
For me, the process of becoming a better rider is also part of the enjoyment. Personal growth. Zen.
 

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Legend in His Own Mind
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Risky Business

Man oh man guy's are we on the same page or what?? That was so well said by each of you that I couldn't possibly improve upon it. Glad to know that other's can share a passion for riding coupled with common sense.
 

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I couldn't agree more with Fred and Bill. When I purchased my Wing, it was a very selfish thing, with a daughter in college and 2 sons in high school. Call it the mid-life crisis if you will, but I was missing something and it filled the void. Flying a helicopter low-level following the contours of the earth and bends of a river was the most exhilarating feeling I have experienced, but something I no longer do. The wing lets me experience those feelings again.
 

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Arn Butt Bill said:
How do I mitigate the risks and still have a good time? . . . Zen.
Since all the safety gear is a game of inches, you gain several magnitudes more safety from riding experience ... practice, reflect on every near miss, correct behavior and always respect the road. Then I throw in some (blind?) faith that everything will be OK, then I can enjoy the ride!
 

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Great Post,

Before my wife and I met we both rode motorcycles, then got married, had kids, gave up riding as to " Be there for the Kids". But as soon as they both Turned sixteen we Both went down and Bought two motorcycles
to continue our love not only for each other but the love of Motorcycling.
There is nothing like a great ride in the country with the smell of fresh cut flowers and grasses and sights you see.
We will give it up when we cannot hold up a motorcycle any more.
Dangerous? yes but that is the risk we take and we will not give it up. Just be careful out there and when that time ever comes well I'll just have a better place to ride.

Best to you all


Steve Scott
 

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What can I say...

I especially agree with the freedom feeling. With all the issues in my life lately, my wing has become my therapist...and we have sessions daily.
 

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Since my accident in June I obviously have had "the conversation" with my wife. She recognizes that I'm not going to stop riding as I love it too much. I still haven't got her back on the pillion although I'm hopeful for this Sunday. Many people, riders included, do not understand how I can get back on a bike considering my accident was nearly fatal. Those are the people who don't understand what it's all about. At our club BBQ this weekend one of our members couldn't understand how people could take the risk of skydiving. I tried explaining to him that it was no different than our risk of riding but he didn't get it. As far as safety gear, riding style, etc, everyone has to set their own limits as to what their risk level is.
 

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Funny thing is (not really funny) is that Dan and Steve are very experienced drivers. Both have been on bikes a long time. So what happened? Was their "time up"? Did the "law of averages" catch up with them? We've often heard the statement, "It's not if, but when." My accident last November happened because I got in a hurry, tried something that wasn't safe, and paid the price for it. Fortunately, there was no serious damage to me, and Rio was fixed back to new conditiion. Others are not so fortunate and get seriously hurt in their accidents.

So, what's the answer? All we seem to be able to come up with is ride aware, take the training regularly, wear appropriate protective clothing and drive as though everyone out there is trying to kill you. That's a little like saying, head in the clouds, chin up, feet on the ground, shoulder to the wheel - and try and work in that position. The seriousness of the situation takes some of the fun out of it. We're often portrayed as care-free, free-living spirits, flitting from place to place on our iron steeds. I trust most of us have a much better understanding of what motorcycling is really all about and do whatever we can to mitigate the circumstances.

Ride safe!

Mesquite Bob
 

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No reasoning, after my first ride over 40 years ago its been in my blood. When I can't hold it up I'll trike it. Ride on dudes! Tim
 

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I don't ride in denial. 20k miles/yr and 1-2 close calls with deer annually. Don't full gear/experience/kid yourselves into thinking a dumb but deadly deer won't appear out of nowhere at any instant and take you out. I've had a few appear as if out of magic and dissapper just as fast (thank God). But still I roll the dice and pray.

Steve
 
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The price I pay for my riding enjoyment was very high after I got into riding 3 years ago.

I was 61 yrs old at the time when I sign up for 1 week of cycle classes and into
a world that I knew nothing about and never rode or own or drove any type of cycle.

After purchasing my '03 Goldwing a week after the classes for my first bike,
I brought this candy red touring bike into our garage where my wife simply refuses to have anything to do with cycles,
so I ride alone 90% of the time. Today I look back and feel it was the best puschased I made after 25,000 miles.

But even today and 41 yrs. of marriage I still get this guilt feeling that maybe I should have pursuit/bought something we both could enjoy,
but she is very tolerate of my passion to ride and feels if I like cycling, I should go for it.
Somes days I feel she has to be a saint to put up with me, but there isn't a day that goes by that I feel I married a most understanding girl in the world.

Cheers!
 

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A lot has been very eloquently stated on this subject, I have been riding for over 30 years and have survived 2 pretty serious accidents fairly unscathed. In both accidents I could see mitigating factors of what I could have done better even though they involved left turning vehicles into my path. After each accident I have had (and one a coworker had 2 years ago) I have done some serious soul searching. But, I always end up back riding, because I know it is part of me. I also was kind of lucky being in the Military for 15 years, I was able to take riding courses (basic, ERC and others) at no cost. I am always saddened when a motorcycle accident happens and those we know are injured, I have been in the hospital holding the hand of friends who have experienced extreme trauma from a motorcycle accident and are having their wounds cleaned out. I was very lucky when I met Jennifer and took her for her first ride on a Wing (demo unit at the 94 or 95 MI State GWRRA Rally) She fell in love with riding and "got it"!! My wife has some visual impairment and the ability to see, smell and experience traveling on the Wing opens up a new world for her that she can't get in a cage. We both understand the risk and do what we can to minimize it. She has faith in my riding experience. She almost fell asleep riding Deals Gap due to the rocking motion :shock: :twisted: , and I have been known to test the lean angle limits of the Wing. The bottom line for us is, life is not guaranteed to be safe, nor would I wish it to be that way. We all have to look at risk management and find what is right for each of us.

Ride Safe, Ride On!!
 

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Yesterday I had Max & Mike at Traxxion do the rear shock on my bike;
Saw your bike at Traxxion yesterday.......when you gonna wash that thing? :D

I got my font end and steering bearing done. NICE!!!!!!!!!!!!
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
steve s said:
Yesterday I had Max & Mike at Traxxion do the rear shock on my bike;
Saw your bike at Traxxion yesterday.......when you gonna wash that thing? :D
I got my font end and steering bearing done. NICE!!!!!!!!!!!!
Mike told me you had been in there; good choice.
And I did wash my bike recently; ask Toyo. It's not my fault that there's so much road splooge...
 

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Id like to say also that I have lived my life from day to day. Like most, I have survived many times when I should'nt have. Ive been a thrill seeker since I was young but as age sets in my bones do not heal as fast as they should. Ive been very lucky but the wing is a an enjoyment for the wife and I. Take a good ride and be safe..........
 

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I want to thank Fred H for sharing his conversation with his wife with us. His words have come to me at a time when i really needed them. Just about two weeks ago I crashed my 4 month old Goldwing. I will detail this later. I came out with just some bruises,aches, & a crushed ego. My wife didn't fair as well. She was OK at the scene but later complained of a headache & upset stomach. We took her to the hospital where tests showed a pool of blood from a broken blood vessel in her head. She has since had to have her skull drilled to flush out the clot. It appears now that she is on the mend, will be released from the hospital in a day or two, and should have no after affects. The whole time that she has been in the hospital has said that she wants to get well quickly so that we can get another bike and continue enjoying our life riding together. I have no idea what I have done to be so lucky to have found a partner such as my wife but I am glad that I did.
Ride Safe
Ken
 

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:shock:

Ken,
My wife and I wish yer wife a speedy and full recovery. Yes you are as lucky as I when it comes to the better halves we ended up with, mine is just what I need when I do something stupid or get the urge to do something outta the box ( I used to jump when I was active duty). :wink: She is patient, understandin' and can pick up a baseball bat to beat me in the head when she doesn't get her way. :roll:
Ridin' the Wing together is one of the things we hold as an "us only thing" when we need to get away from the day to day grind. She has her moments of when idiots are around us but she feels that I can do what I need to do to keep us safe. 8)


:flg:
 

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Ken

I wish you and your wife and full and speedy recovery.

I agree with the above posts which maximize safety and our time on this earth. That being said, my goal in life is NOT to reach the grave with a perfect body, all my teeth in perfect dental repair, shirking any risky activity which might inflict damage. Rather, my goal is to use my body
as long as possible, wearing it out to the max. I would like to look back at the end of my life and say, man, that was one heck of a ride.
 

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Reading these post has been heartening as I can relate to them and no longer feel alone with this issue.
I've been riding a long time now. Started out with dirt bikes as a kid and progressed thru a long, long "dark era" of 1% riding. Now at 56 years old, I'm on a Wing...just hard to imagine...lol. I've been off a street bike only twice in my life; once very seriously when an 18-wheeler turned left in front of me on a two-lane road. I was doing about 65 and had less than 100 feet to "do something". I ended up with the bike and me both sliding under the trailer, between the tires and out the other side. Bike totalled and I spent weeks plucking rocks, gravel, sand, hay and sticks out of under my skin. I was stopped by a fellow biker from outright shooting the truck driver right there on the scene. Yes, I wanted to kill him and had the means to do so in my hand. He was a family man with a wife and two kids just trying to make a living. He pleaded that he just didn't see me and he probably didn't.... I quit riding after that for long time. After much thought (and knowing it was in my blood), I got back on a bike and realized how much riding had meant to me. Here recently, I bought the Wing for touring and its the only thing my wife will ride. It also just happens to be the best motorcycle I've ever owned....
We've taken the safety courses, we dress properly, I put modulators on both the headlight and the brakelight.....it aggravates some people, but I don't care. I'd rather have em aggravated and know I'm there than to not see me. I treat everything out there as if its out to kill me and deal with mitigating that risk as much as possible. Seeing this recent rash of Winger accidents makes us all ponder and reflect, but I'm not going to quit riding again because of it....it means to much to me.
 
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