GL1800Riders Forums banner

1 - 19 of 19 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
150 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Had a long phone chat with the CFO in the household last night. She wants to do a week long road trip on the goldwing. We will be pulling a champion Colorado trailer behind the goldwing. It looks like the route will be from Southern California through Lake Tahoe and onwards towards flathead lake in Montana to spend time with her relatives. From there we will head west to visit some of my relatives in Tacoma Washington. Last stop will be home in Southern California.


I'm currently working out of town on a 12 month assignment in superior Wisconsin/Duluth Minnesota. During the next year I will be putting a plan together for this trip & bike. The bike is a 2001 completely stock low mileage base model. I'd like to outfit it with quality parts that work. I would like opinions from everyone here that might be able to offer suggestions on what might work better.


Number one on the list is tires. Current ones are ~8 years old and almost showing cords.


I'll picking up the following:


Bridgestones tires
nomar junior pro tire changer with optional position-clamp accessory to assist with the gold wing tire installation. I'm sick of paying for someone else to change my own tires as I go through them so often.




Kuryakyn Chrome Passenger Cruise Pegs for GL1800
Ergo II Iso Wing Highwayboards for GL1800


Heated grips and a big thanks to bartman for the following DIY: http://gl1800riders.com/forums/showthread.php?270480-Install-the-Electrical-Connection-quot-New-quot-heated-grips-and-review-of-their-performance


Now for those hot uncomfortable 100 plus degree days I'd like to utilize the cooler on the front of the trailer. I thought about buying a pre-made system but the cost seems a little excessive as the wife would need one as well, we can't have two coolers at once with the current systems on the market. Also at $400 per person this seems a little too rich for my blood. I want two pumps in the ice chest to allow each person to turn off the pump to their vest. As for hooking up everything here are my ideas: A quick disconnection at the ice chest. The tubing from the ice chest would be routed above the saddle bags and connected to the passenger grab handle. There will be another quick disconnection point here to attach to the cooling vest.


I'm not sure what kind of pumps to use and would like some feedback on this. My original idea was for a variable frequency submergible pump so that I could adjust the flow of fluid. This idea seems more complicated than the typical on/off type set up. Next is size I need something that has power as there will be quite a bit of friction through all of the tubing. I'm hoping that the aquarium industry has something that will work and be affordable.


The following DIY is what I was thinking of:


http://www.poyntsource.com/New/Cool_Vest.htm


next up is electrical.


For all of the electrical connections I'd like to build a fuze block in the location of the CD player in the top case. This seems like the easiest way to add on my current ideas and a platform for future additions.


Electrical additions for the bike. 12 volt connections for radar & Zumo 550 GPS. Two cigarette lighters to be used as a power source for charging cellphones and other devices. I would like to be able to use a powerful air pump to blow up an air mattress at campgrounds. When i get back home I'll take a look at the air pump and see what kind of power requirements it takes. I'm assuming that this unit will draw the most amount of energy so I will design the fuse block system with this in mind.


Heating and cooling. Cooling as mentioned above will be the two pumps in the ice chest and heating will be via first gear heated jacket/gloves/pants for rider & passenger.


Last but but not least is communication. This is going to be the most difficult for me. I'd like to find some kind of custom fit ear buds that cancel out as much back ground noise as possible. I'm already on the borderline between moderate and profound deaf and do not want to lose anymore hearing. Right now I put ear plugs in each time I get on the bike.


Anyone have suggestions that I might be able to look into? I know that this is one area that certain brands work well while others are a gimmick.


Thanks & I look forward to your comments and suggestions.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
994 Posts
Most people find the stock seat pretty lacking in the comfort department.IMHO a good aftermarket seat with a Utopia style backrest is a must.That and good hyway pegs would be at the top of my list after the regular stuff(tires,fluids,brakes etc...)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
150 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
Most people find the stock seat pretty lacking in the comfort department.IMHO a good aftermarket seat with a Utopia style backrest is a must.That and good hyway pegs would be at the top of my list after the regular stuff(tires,fluids,brakes etc...)
Thanks for the response. I find the stock seat very comfortable. The Utopia backrest was on the top of my list of things to do two or three months ago before taking this assignment. I'll put it down on my must do checklist.
 

·
IronMan
Joined
·
17,452 Posts
air wings help alot- give ya air - keeps air / water /bugs off ya. especially under mirror ones . for tires i use a funny one on back- imop much safer - more miles- better traction - less money . good luck enjoy your trip.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
150 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
air wings help alot- give ya air - keeps air / water /bugs off ya. especially under mirror ones . for tires i use a funny one on back- imop much safer - more miles- better traction - less money . good luck enjoy your trip.

Thanks. I would go to the dark side but when I un-hitch the trailer I like to ride the goldwing like a sport bike and lean it over in the corners. Something about a flat tire on the back affecting turn in doesn't appeal that much to me. On the bright side I'll be able to do all my own tire changes when I pick up the tire changer. This should help offset some of the maintenance cost. It should pay for itself in about 2 years with how much riding I do.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,731 Posts
I would look into LDComfort gear, and search Bubba1's posts about how to use it correctly. I finally broke down and bought some last year before our trip. I was able to ride in 106 degree temps and was actually a bit chilled. They are a huge improvement over normal evaporative vests, and last a lot longer if used correctly. I'd at least look into it before spending time, effort and money on your cooling system. Use the cooler to store snacks and beverages for your stops. For the wind noise I would suggest Mic-mutes and a push to talk switch. It's an awesome product.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
693 Posts
tires

If you don't want to stay with car tires get another rim and swap as needed. I don't have a problem scraping pegs in tight turns. I have never worn tires in so few miles until I got the Honda. All I run is a rear on front and a run flat on rear.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,875 Posts
you are underestimating the car tire for the rear. the latest 2 popular runflats give you handling like there is a mc tire back there; and a LOT safer.------- this will be one of , if not, the best things you can do for your wing. and no, you do not ride more aggressively than many of the car tire users do. even yellow wolf is using a car tire now, tho not a run flat. for riding 2 up---car tire is practically mandatory in my view---far safer for your precious cargo! ymmv.
utopia backrest is very very good.
highway pegs for somewhere else to move your feet to. many people swear by mick-o-pegs.
baker air wings that mount under the mirrors are good for air flow control.
get each of you LD comfort underwear/gear, including the helmet liner. see posts by bubba1 for proper usage. forget the cooler/pump idea---SO not needed!! I have been in 107* temps and was quite comfortable---but you do have to be moving, not sitting still.
a front suspension upgrade---even just stronger springs--will make a noticeable improvement in the handling.
there are several communication options---senna seems to be popular now, i think.
these changes will get you far along in your quest for a great trip!
have a good trip-----and REALLY check out using a car tire----I WILL NEVER PUT A REGULAR MC TIRE ON THE REAR OF MY WING AGAIN!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
29 Posts
There are some water vests that work great when desert running. Wet them good, place in plastic bag, put them on sun is hot. By the time you stop again you are dry.

Sent from my SAMSUNG-SM-G730A using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,505 Posts
Consider getting a windshield vent and cutting the hole yourself.

I question the need to change your own tires if you are getting 8 years to a set.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,897 Posts
Had a long phone chat with the CFO in the household last night. She wants to do a week long road trip on the goldwing. We will be pulling a champion Colorado trailer behind the goldwing. It looks like the route will be from Southern California through Lake Tahoe and onwards towards flathead lake in Montana to spend time with her relatives. From there we will head west to visit some of my relatives in Tacoma Washington. Last stop will be home in Southern California.


I'm currently working out of town on a 12 month assignment in superior Wisconsin/Duluth Minnesota. During the next year I will be putting a plan together for this trip & bike. The bike is a 2001 completely stock low mileage base model. I'd like to outfit it with quality parts that work. I would like opinions from everyone here that might be able to offer suggestions on what might work better.


Number one on the list is tires. Current ones are ~8 years old and almost showing cords.


I'll picking up the following:


Bridgestones tires
nomar junior pro tire changer with optional position-clamp accessory to assist with the gold wing tire installation. I'm sick of paying for someone else to change my own tires as I go through them so often.




Kuryakyn Chrome Passenger Cruise Pegs for GL1800
Ergo II Iso Wing Highwayboards for GL1800


Heated grips and a big thanks to bartman for the following DIY: http://gl1800riders.com/forums/showthread.php?270480-Install-the-Electrical-Connection-quot-New-quot-heated-grips-and-review-of-their-performance


Now for those hot uncomfortable 100 plus degree days I'd like to utilize the cooler on the front of the trailer. I thought about buying a pre-made system but the cost seems a little excessive as the wife would need one as well, we can't have two coolers at once with the current systems on the market. Also at $400 per person this seems a little too rich for my blood. I want two pumps in the ice chest to allow each person to turn off the pump to their vest. As for hooking up everything here are my ideas: A quick disconnection at the ice chest. The tubing from the ice chest would be routed above the saddle bags and connected to the passenger grab handle. There will be another quick disconnection point here to attach to the cooling vest.


I'm not sure what kind of pumps to use and would like some feedback on this. My original idea was for a variable frequency submergible pump so that I could adjust the flow of fluid. This idea seems more complicated than the typical on/off type set up. Next is size I need something that has power as there will be quite a bit of friction through all of the tubing. I'm hoping that the aquarium industry has something that will work and be affordable.


The following DIY is what I was thinking of:


http://www.poyntsource.com/New/Cool_Vest.htm


next up is electrical.


For all of the electrical connections I'd like to build a fuze block in the location of the CD player in the top case. This seems like the easiest way to add on my current ideas and a platform for future additions.


Electrical additions for the bike. 12 volt connections for radar & Zumo 550 GPS. Two cigarette lighters to be used as a power source for charging cellphones and other devices. I would like to be able to use a powerful air pump to blow up an air mattress at campgrounds. When i get back home I'll take a look at the air pump and see what kind of power requirements it takes. I'm assuming that this unit will draw the most amount of energy so I will design the fuse block system with this in mind.


Heating and cooling. Cooling as mentioned above will be the two pumps in the ice chest and heating will be via first gear heated jacket/gloves/pants for rider & passenger.


Last but but not least is communication. This is going to be the most difficult for me. I'd like to find some kind of custom fit ear buds that cancel out as much back ground noise as possible. I'm already on the borderline between moderate and profound deaf and do not want to lose anymore hearing. Right now I put ear plugs in each time I get on the bike.


Anyone have suggestions that I might be able to look into? I know that this is one area that certain brands work well while others are a gimmick.


Thanks & I look forward to your comments and suggestions.
I would lose the trailer
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,839 Posts
Had a long phone chat with the CFO in the household last night. She wants to do a week long road trip on the goldwing. We will be pulling a champion Colorado trailer behind the goldwing. It looks like the route will be from Southern California through Lake Tahoe and onwards towards flathead lake in Montana to spend time with her relatives. From there we will head west to visit some of my relatives in Tacoma Washington. Last stop will be home in Southern California.


I'm currently working out of town on a 12 month assignment in superior Wisconsin/Duluth Minnesota. During the next year I will be putting a plan together for this trip & bike. The bike is a 2001 completely stock low mileage base model. I'd like to outfit it with quality parts that work. I would like opinions from everyone here that might be able to offer suggestions on what might work better.


Number one on the list is tires. Current ones are ~8 years old and almost showing cords.


I'll picking up the following:


Bridgestones tires
nomar junior pro tire changer with optional position-clamp accessory to assist with the gold wing tire installation. I'm sick of paying for someone else to change my own tires as I go through them so often.




Kuryakyn Chrome Passenger Cruise Pegs for GL1800
Ergo II Iso Wing Highwayboards for GL1800


Heated grips and a big thanks to bartman for the following DIY: http://gl1800riders.com/forums/showthread.php?270480-Install-the-Electrical-Connection-quot-New-quot-heated-grips-and-review-of-their-performance


Now for those hot uncomfortable 100 plus degree days I'd like to utilize the cooler on the front of the trailer. I thought about buying a pre-made system but the cost seems a little excessive as the wife would need one as well, we can't have two coolers at once with the current systems on the market. Also at $400 per person this seems a little too rich for my blood. I want two pumps in the ice chest to allow each person to turn off the pump to their vest. As for hooking up everything here are my ideas: A quick disconnection at the ice chest. The tubing from the ice chest would be routed above the saddle bags and connected to the passenger grab handle. There will be another quick disconnection point here to attach to the cooling vest.


I'm not sure what kind of pumps to use and would like some feedback on this. My original idea was for a variable frequency submergible pump so that I could adjust the flow of fluid. This idea seems more complicated than the typical on/off type set up. Next is size I need something that has power as there will be quite a bit of friction through all of the tubing. I'm hoping that the aquarium industry has something that will work and be affordable.


The following DIY is what I was thinking of:


http://www.poyntsource.com/New/Cool_Vest.htm


next up is electrical.


For all of the electrical connections I'd like to build a fuze block in the location of the CD player in the top case. This seems like the easiest way to add on my current ideas and a platform for future additions.


Electrical additions for the bike. 12 volt connections for radar & Zumo 550 GPS. Two cigarette lighters to be used as a power source for charging cellphones and other devices. I would like to be able to use a powerful air pump to blow up an air mattress at campgrounds. When i get back home I'll take a look at the air pump and see what kind of power requirements it takes. I'm assuming that this unit will draw the most amount of energy so I will design the fuse block system with this in mind.


Heating and cooling. Cooling as mentioned above will be the two pumps in the ice chest and heating will be via first gear heated jacket/gloves/pants for rider & passenger.


Last but but not least is communication. This is going to be the most difficult for me. I'd like to find some kind of custom fit ear buds that cancel out as much back ground noise as possible. I'm already on the borderline between moderate and profound deaf and do not want to lose anymore hearing. Right now I put ear plugs in each time I get on the bike.



Anyone have suggestions that I might be able to look into? I know that this is one area that certain brands work well while others are a gimmick.


Thanks & I look forward to your comments and suggestions.
I think you may be overthinking the whole thing.

Ride some short trips, couple of days, with your wife before you invest in a bunch of stuff. Try the Sierras and the coast to get a feel for varying conditions. You're already in Bakersfield so you're not going to see anything hotter.

Most people do fine without any cooling apparatus. Get set up with the correct gear and a set of driver and passenger Butler Cups and stay hydrated and covered. There is a lot of info and smart people on this site regarding riding gear (clothing). There is the LD stuff. My wife and I just use layers. Don't skimp on helmets, jackets, gloves and boots. You will need rain gear and it can serve as the outer layer for cold/wet conditions.

Heated grips are nice, but a good set of gloves can get it done for the trip you are describing.

If you are going to stick with a motorcycle tire (which I do also), and pull a trailer, the Dunlop E3 rear has the highest load rating and lasts the longest. Keep the pressure correct and check your tires regularly on your trip, wings pulling trailers are kinda hard on rear tires.

Highway pegs are a good idea, I had Kurys for 5 years and then switched to Mico-pegs because the Kury leg position started hurting my aging hips.

You're gonna love touring on the wing.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
64 Posts
I would lose the trailer
The trailer would be the LAST thing I would think about leaving behind (maybe my wife would be first)! You will no doubt need the room for a small cooler and change of clothing/belongings. I find ice cold water to drink from the cooler is extremely important especially in the summer heat. Try not to pack the kitchen sink (which is what I ended up doing the first several times).

There are just too many items to supplement the GoldWing and most are up to each individual's taste. But music from say, an iPod is most important to me. Also, I have often found it most useful to have a bag of tools on board the kind you can find at Wally World in an ABS case and then ad to them some specialized tools specific to the Wing in a canvas tool bag. YMMV

One thing many people don't think a lot about is their comfort clothing. I know there are many people on here that will recommend LD Comfort shorts and clothing. I found them too expensive and (shorts) too hot to wear in the summer because the air does not circulate. I have found a far better alternative at less than half the cost and can be worn in any season. They are moisture wicking, anti-microbial, and breathes very well even in intense summer heat. Made from stretchy thin fabric with a wide waistband and undetectable flat seams that are oh so comfortable you can't even tell you are wearing them at all.

UNFORTUNATELY, the last time I made mention of the company that makes this product on this forum my post was promptly removed. I will assume that a paying advertiser who probably sells LD Comfort shorts may have protested, don't know, just guessing. So if anyone wants to know about this product, you can e-mail me a query and I will reply with a link. I have no affiliation with the company and make no profit from mentioning them, just a believer and a very satisfied customer who can now stay in the saddle for several hours in comfort and withOUT the monkey butt!!! No PM's please. The moderators read them too.

[email protected]
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,792 Posts
I was never a fan of the air wings, I think they are ugly and make the bike look...ugly. But after riding around on my new FJR for a month, I never realized how much air the Wing is blocking. I think I would get the air wings now.

For a fuse block, I have the PC8 from Eastern Beaver in the CD area. Easy to wire up, very well made unit.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,875 Posts
The heat out gear/ undergarments from cycle gear work " ok"- beats nothing. The LD comfort helmet liner and long sleeve top work great. I am not a huge fan of their shorts tho-......
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,391 Posts
Your going to have a great trip. I also recommend a couple several day or long weekend rips to tune up.
The key for long rides is to not over pack. A couple tricks is to take cloths that you can ditch, instead of carrying dirty laundry or having to make too many laundry stops.
For us, camping is in the past. And a trailer is just too inconvenient when parking and dealing with traffic. We pack light but still have comfort. Instead of sneakers to wear after the ride, we have sandals that pack small. Our riding boots are comfortable enough that we can hike in them. I pack travel pants for casual evenings. These have the pant legs that zip off, so they double as short pants. T-Shirts are cotton-Poly. They are comfortable and can be rinced out and dry over night. One can save a lot of room packing cloths that are the right items.
We carry our elecrtric heated jacket liners, rain gear, evaporitive cooling vests and bike cover... along with other items in our separate Trunk. It's like the Pak-It Rak, but I made it up myself. We prefer this over a trailer because we don't even know it is there when on the road. We have plenty of room for all our gear. Our last 5300 mile trip in 18 days... we were not for needing anything and still had room to bring some souveriners home. Larger junk bought can be Fed-Ex'd home. We hit every kind of weather but were comfortable having all the right riding gear.

Pack light. Pack smart and enjoy.
I'm sure you will!

Corventure Dave


New one trunk.jpg
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
994 Posts
Thanks for the response. I find the stock seat very comfortable. The Utopia backrest was on the top of my list of things to do two or three months ago before taking this assignment. I'll put it down on my must do checklist.
Let us know after your trip how comfortable you think the stock seat is.I say this because they all feel pretty good when you first jump on,but after a few days in the saddle they start to show their true colours.JMHO.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
150 Posts
Discussion Starter #18
Wish tires lasted that long

Consider getting a windshield vent and cutting the hole yourself.

I question the need to change your own tires if you are getting 8 years to a set.
8 years to a set of tires. I wish they lasted me that long! The tires that are on there now came on the bike. On my sport bike I went through 5 sets in my first. year. $2400 in rubber and I was quickly introduced to the expense of motorcycles. I think I go through a couple of sets a year now. I'm expecting to average about two to three sets a year on the sport bike and at least one set a year on the goldwing per year. Local shops charge $25-$30 a tire. If I get a good deal online on tires the local shops make up the difference for the mounting by charging $50-$60 a set. It doesn't take too many tire changes to pay for the equipment. One little advantage I have over your average rider is I worked at cyclegear while I was in college. I think I've changed two hundred tires. Worst ones would have to be dirt bikes followed by HD's. As for sportbikes they were all easy. The 190 rear tires on the 1000cc bikes were a little more difficult but not by much.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
150 Posts
Discussion Starter #19
Your going to have a great trip. I also recommend a couple several day or long weekend rips to tune up.
The key for long rides is to not over pack. A couple tricks is to take cloths that you can ditch, instead of carrying dirty laundry or having to make too many laundry stops.
For us, camping is in the past. And a trailer is just too inconvenient when parking and dealing with traffic. We pack light but still have comfort. Instead of sneakers to wear after the ride, we have sandals that pack small. Our riding boots are comfortable enough that we can hike in them. I pack travel pants for casual evenings. These have the pant legs that zip off, so they double as short pants. T-Shirts are cotton-Poly. They are comfortable and can be rinced out and dry over night. One can save a lot of room packing cloths that are the right items.
We carry our elecrtric heated jacket liners, rain gear, evaporitive cooling vests and bike cover... along with other items in our separate Trunk. It's like the Pak-It Rak, but I made it up myself. We prefer this over a trailer because we don't even know it is there when on the road. We have plenty of room for all our gear. Our last 5300 mile trip in 18 days... we were not for needing anything and still had room to bring some souveriners home. Larger junk bought can be Fed-Ex'd home. We hit every kind of weather but were comfortable having all the right riding gear.

Pack light. Pack smart and enjoy.
I'm sure you will!

Corventure Dave


View attachment 50282
wish I could ditch the trailer but the wife won't let me. She is the type that needs to bring along creature comforts. It doesn't bother me much because I bought the bike with the trailer with the intention of taking trips like this. I'm frugal and would like to travel but $120 a night in a hotel just seems excessive. I was hoping to catch campgrounds two nights in a row with a hotel/motel every third night. It would be nice to find campgrounds with shower accommodations at reasonable rates.

My my wife has been planning more trips than I could possibly imagine. She has been using roadtrippers.com. The only way I could possibly keep up with her trips were to win the lotto and hit the road for a couple of years.
 
1 - 19 of 19 Posts
Top