GL1800Riders Forums banner

1 - 16 of 16 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
61 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
On my 2003, I started having overheating problems this year. In the past it would overheat in parades or real slow riding over extended periods. But now it is starting to overheat just riding around town or riding mountain passes with some steep grade.The coolant was changed out last year ,the levels are fine.The ECM was not changed out during the recall in the early years. Honda is balking at replacing it know even though the recall doesnt expire until march 2012.The dealer wants to start replacing thermostats and water pumps even though we dont see any leaks.
Does any body have any other suggestions? Also I have replaced the raditor cap.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
24,624 Posts
Well remove the radiator cap again, get a good light and see what you see.

Are the radiators all gunked up and scale coats their inside surface??

For sure the water pump and or thermostat can be bad, time does those things, scale and corrosion settles, thermostats fail to fully open ,and pump impellers wear down.

As it is getting more and more a chronic problem, has to be from corrosion and gunk, or thermostat not fully opening, something along those lines.

If you see white, yellow, off white, scale on the internal parts of the radiators, that might tell the story.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,853 Posts
put the bike on the sidestand and burp the radiators again. You might be surprised by more bubbles. Then put a bottle of perxoide in a spray bottle and soak the radiators from both sides. let them set a few min and flush them with water. soft water if you have it. You would probably be surprised at all the dead bugs that come out. Our wing was doing that on our last trip in june, after I changed out the coolant also. I went thru this process, got more air out and has not gotten past the center mark since.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
878 Posts
If you find air in the rad, then do check out the hose going to the overflow bottle... A friends bike had disconnected at the bottle end of that hose... His bike would loose antifreeze slowly (while riding in hot conditions) and then just suck air in during it's cool down...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
809 Posts
I had the same problem with my 04. It was not too bad at first then got worse. I kept checking the resavoir to make sure it was full and it always was. It never leaked but finally it started getting hot when driving anywhere. After 2 days of tearing everything appart what I found was the little peice that goes between the radiator and the resivor was cracked. So what happened was when the bike got hot the fans would come on but the water never circulated enough to cool the bike off. Cost me $25 to fix and alot of headaches. Hope that might help
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
19,989 Posts
The ECM was not changed out during the recall in the early years. Honda is balking at replacing it know even though the recall doesnt expire until march 2012.The dealer wants to start replacing thermostats and water pumps even though we dont see any leaks.
Does any body have any other suggestions? Also I have replaced the raditor cap.
It is a common misconception among Goldwing owners that there was a recall concerning the overheating issue. In reality, there was never any such thing.

The "Product Improvement Campaign", as it is stated on the notice that was sent out to all owners, was the result of a Class Action Settlement, not a recall.

Per the terms of the settlement, the campaign ended on December 31st 2006. I don't know where you got the 2012 date from. Honda no longer has any responsibility for this issue, especially on a 9 year old bike.

Regarding the actual problem:

There were a number of potential problems that dealer techs looked for while performing the service bulletin. The ECM replacement was actually a minor part of the campaign, although it received the most attention on the message boards.

1. There is a wire that can get pinched against the radiator, allowing current to flow through the radiator. This caused a sand like substance to build up in the radiator and can clog it.

2. Honda also found a few heads that had excessive slag in the coolant passages. This could impede coolant flow, and over time can cause sediment and scale buildup to block the passages.

Since these inspections were not done during the campaign, if this is causing your problem now, you are pretty much screwed. You will have a fairly expensive repair on your hands.

Of course, there are other, more common problems that can cause overheating in ANY older engine. You could have a thermostat stuck partially closed. Your fans may not be working. Your temp sensor could be bad. Or you could have excessive scale built up in the cooling system that was knocked loose during the coolant flush, which could now be blocking passages.

Also, there is a possibility that you just have air in your system that is preventing coolant flow and needs to be burped out.

Bottom line is that this is going to be on your dime.
 

·
Vendor
Joined
·
17,367 Posts
Of coarse all the basic stuff is important ... clean coolant, no leaks, a radiator cap that holds pressure, the recovery system is working as designed, and that the fans come on.

After all that, when the fans come on, feel the blow with your hands. Is it equal and the temp the same? Use a light and see if you can see light through the rad grids. But all that is not really a test for air flow. To really tell, you have to get the cowl off and seporated them from the fan assemblies.

You may need to pull them and have and have them professionlly cleaned by a radiator shop. The other thing to test is to remove the thermostate. But with the troubel to get to it, with it being on an older GL1800, just replace it as PM.

I doubt it is an ECM problem.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,676 Posts
It is a common misconception among Goldwing owners that there was a recall concerning the overheating issue. In reality, there was never any such thing.

The "Product Improvement Campaign", as it is stated on the notice that was sent out to all owners, was the result of a Class Action Settlement, not a recall.

Per the terms of the settlement, the campaign ended on December 31st 2006. I don't know where you got the 2012 date from. Honda no longer has any responsibility for this issue, especially on a 9 year old bike.

Regarding the actual problem:

There were a number of potential problems that dealer techs looked for while performing the service bulletin. The ECM replacement was actually a minor part of the campaign, although it received the most attention on the message boards.

1. There is a wire that can get pinched against the radiator, allowing current to flow through the radiator. This caused a sand like substance to build up in the radiator and can clog it.

2. Honda also found a few heads that had excessive slag in the coolant passages. This could impede coolant flow, and over time can cause sediment and scale buildup to block the passages.

Since these inspections were not done during the campaign, if this is causing your problem now, you are pretty much screwed. You will have a fairly expensive repair on your hands.

Of course, there are other, more common problems that can cause overheating in ANY older engine. You could have a thermostat stuck partially closed. Your fans may not be working. Your temp sensor could be bad. Or you could have excessive scale built up in the cooling system that was knocked loose during the coolant flush, which could now be blocking passages.

Also, there is a possibility that you just have air in your system that is preventing coolant flow and needs to be burped out.

Bottom line is that this is going to be on your dime.
The confusion may be in the difference between a "recall" and a "technical service bulletin" ("TSB"). There were actually two TSB's for the 2001 - 2004 GL1800 for overheating. TSB1800A13 replacing the ECM and TSB100103 Bleeding Air from Cooling system after ECM replacement. Unfortunately unlike recall's which extend over the life of the motorcycle, TSB's are only covered by Honda during the warranty period. After that the consumer pays for the cost of a TSB.

There were 42 TSB's for the 2003 GL1800 ... here is the nhsta.gov resource
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
19,989 Posts
That's correct Joe. Service bulletins are nothing more than support documents for technicians. They are usually just instructional guides to help technicians troubleshoot specific problems or information releases. Recalls are usually announced to the service channel via a service bulletin, and that creates confusion with customers.

There are various types of TSB's. Most of them are only to be performed if the technician finds that the vehicle exhibits the symptoms in the bulletin. You can't just come in and demand that a certain bulletin be performed.

Some bulletins are designated to be performed on all vehicles that come in for service, whether the vehicle has the problem or not, and regardless of whether the customer lists the problem as a complaint.

The OH bulletin was an unusual type of bulletin. The settlement determined the terms. Dealers were to perform it for any customer that requested it for the duration listed in the bulletin. The status of the customer's warranty had nothing to do with it. After 2006, Honda's obligation ended, and it was handled case by case based on Honda's own internal policies.

Except for recalls or lawsuit settlements, TSB's are not normally released as public documents. They are intended as internal support documents for their dealer network. And you can't judge the quality of a vehicle based on the number of TSB's Some mfr's are more proactive than others on how much support they give their servicing network. It is usually a good sign when mfr's release numerous bulletins for a vehicle. It means that technicians are receiving support, instead of being left to figure things out for themselves.
 
S

·
Guest
Joined
·
0 Posts
I had the same problem with my 04. It was not too bad at first then got worse. I kept checking the resavoir to make sure it was full and it always was. It never leaked but finally it started getting hot when driving anywhere. After 2 days of tearing everything appart what I found was the little peice that goes between the radiator and the resivor was cracked. So what happened was when the bike got hot the fans would come on but the water never circulated enough to cool the bike off. Cost me $25 to fix and alot of headaches. Hope that might help
Sorry but that makes no sense - the reservoir has nothing to do with circulation. It just hold overflow and allows for expansion and replenishment. The engine will run and cool 100% without the reservoir.

My guess is a stuck or defective thermostat, the wax has probably leaked out. I would try this first. Some air in the system will not hamper cooling. As long as the pump can pull fluid it will cool.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
19,989 Posts
Sorry but that makes no sense - the reservoir has nothing to do with circulation. It just hold overflow and allows for expansion and replenishment. The engine will run and cool 100% without the reservoir.

My guess is a stuck or defective thermostat, the wax has probably leaked out. I would try this first. Some air in the system will not hamper cooling. As long as the pump can pull fluid it will cool.
If the air is at the top, near the filler neck, yes, you are correct. It won't affect flow or cooling. And the lack of a connection to the reservoir will usually only create air near the filler neck. So I agree with you on that subject.

But air in today's cooling systems can and does cause overheating. Air pockets down in the cooling system can completely stop the flow of coolant, depending on where the air pocket is at. This is why manufacturers all have specific procedures for filling a cooling system, and why we have tools like the Air Lift. You can't just dump coolant in and be done with it. If you are changing fluid, or filling a system that was low on coolant, you have to be careful that you don't create an air pocket. If you are just topping off the system, it shouldn't be a big deal.

We have had a number of owners here over the years who have had overheating problems due to this problem.

You may already know that. I just wanted to expand on the statement.
 
S

·
Guest
Joined
·
0 Posts
Yes and no Larry, Most likely it's just the thermostat. Some air is not going to have much affect. A lot of air and the pump will cavitate so flow will be impeded however air can not stop the flow completely as air is not cement.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
694 Posts
Had a 03

It SHOWED overheat from day 1 but never boiled over. I did the ECM change out and they also replaced the temp gauge harness with one that had a resister in it so the temp gauge would not show the needle pegged until it was really ready to boil over

Ever since them till it was sold no issues. I don't remember if they marked the VIN plate with a punch mark when they did this repair or when they did the frame weld recall.

Check all the stuff mentioned above and if none of that works start hunting salvage yards for an ECM thats been updated. If you are really hard core get the harness too. No sure how to tell if its been updated but the next post will be from someone who knows I bet.


Good luck
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,197 Posts
It is a common misconception among Goldwing owners that there was a recall concerning the overheating issue. In reality, there was never any such thing.

The "Product Improvement Campaign", as it is stated on the notice that was sent out to all owners, was the result of a Class Action Settlement, not a recall.

Per the terms of the settlement, the campaign ended on December 31st 2006. I don't know where you got the 2012 date from. Honda no longer has any responsibility for this issue, especially on a 9 year old bike.
Honda did add another two years of warranty with the cooling systems as a result of the class action lawsuit with the affected bikes....so if you had the 4 year extended warranty, the cooling system should have been covered for 9 years.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
19,989 Posts
Honda did add another two years of warranty with the cooling systems as a result of the class action lawsuit with the affected bikes....so if you had the 4 year extended warranty, the cooling system should have been covered for 9 years.
You bring up a good point Roadie. IF he had an extended warranty, and IF he is still within the 9 year period, he could demand that the work the mechanic is proposing be done under the terms of the settlement. But he can't go into the dealer and just demand that the ECM be replaced. At this point, Honda is only required to replace parts that are determined to be defective. It will be up to the technician and Honda to determine if it is defective.

I looked at the settlement paperwork, and it does not appear that you had to have the bulletin performed to get the extended warranty. As far as I can tell, it is available to everyone in the class.

It is certainly worth looking into. It might save him a few bucks.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
878 Posts
A quick easy test for the over flow bottle is to disconnect the hose up near the rad cap.... Use a vacuum source (I use a mighty vac) to see if you can draw coolant from the overflow bottle... If you can, and the fluid is free of air bubbles, likely you are all good down there...
 
1 - 16 of 16 Posts
Top