GL1800Riders Forums banner

1 - 20 of 31 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
216 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
2002 Wing


I opened C22,C23, C24, C25 – the cluster in front of the right air intake – just to check things out. There was dirt and sand particles at the bottom of the male section of the three large connectors. The male pins looked a bit odd, so the whole assembly was washed with vinegar and male pins scrubbed with contact cleaner.


Most of the Wing connectors are sealed type – clearly these are not. An additional problem is the loose fitting junction of the anterior and posterior sections of the upper air vent is right over the connectors.


I have ACDelco Dielectric Lubricant and am inclined to use it to pack the junctions.


Any strong opinions??
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,792 Posts
"Dielectric grease is a non-conductive, silicone -based grease that's designed to seal out moisture and prevent corrosion on electrical connectors. It also disrupts the flow of electrical current, which makes it good for lubricating and sealing the rubber parts of electrical connectors."


Not dielectric grease. It can cause more problems with low current applications. Used mostly on high voltage connections.


I use Deoxit D5 to clean and protect my connectors.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
216 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
Since my first post, I did some Googling and saw that opinion about avoiding it on the connectors proper. But no references?? Maybe it is one of those “truths” that continues to circulate even if wrong.

Here is some info from the Permatex website:.
****************************
“Permatex Dielectric Tune-up Grease - Technical Data Sheet

1. For connectors and battery terminals
2. Make sure the ignition system is off.
3.Clean surfaces with appropriate cleaner such as Permatex Brake and Parts Cleaner or Battery Cleaner.
4.Coat both parts with grease.
Also from their web site
Directions for Connectors:

  1. Make sure ignition system is off.
  2. Clean surface with Permatex® Contact Cleaner.
  3. Coat both parts of terminal contact with Dielectric Grease.
  4. Reassemble, maintaining metal-to-metal contact.
********************************************** Dug this up from a “Product Safety Recall” for a Chev Malibu
“On these vehicles, over time an increased resistance can develop in the Body Control Module (BCM) connection system and result in voltage fluctuations or intermittency in the Brake Apply Sensor (BAS) circuit that can cause service brake lamp malfunction. “

Apply the dielectric lubricant (clear gel), GM P/N 12377900 (in Canada, use P/N
10953529), completely across all of the terminal pins in the BCM.

Use a one-inch nylon bristle brush to spread the lubricant evenly onto all terminal pins.

Again using the applicator stick, apply a 10 mm dab of dielectric lubricant completely
across the connector face of the BCM connector.

Use a one-inch nylon bristle brush to spread the lubricant evenly into all terminal holes
******************
So Cheviot fixed a problem by drowning the connectors in Dielectric Lub:)


If you look at the Wing contacts, you can see the scrap marks where the metal to metal contacts is made, That would wipe off the goo!!


I have a high end ohmmeter and I'll takes some reading first without lube and then after the lube is applied.


 

·
Registered
Joined
·
364 Posts
I smeared dielectric grease on a 4 pin connector for my trailer and the lights quit working. I went over everything and nothing worked. I cleaned all the grease off and plugged the lights back in and they started working. My experience but then I have put that in bullet connectors to ensure water didn't cause problems and they still worked. So I am interested in what you find out.

Sent from my SM-N960U using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,970 Posts
If it were mine I wouldn’t pack a multi pin connector full of grease. It would just make a mess in my opinion. Just clean the connector. If you worried about it you could cover the outside with a sleeve or something.

I don’t think the grease would hurt anything though.
 

·
GL1800 Doctor
Joined
·
20,372 Posts
Since my first post, I did some Googling and saw that opinion about avoiding it on the connectors proper. But no references?? Maybe it is one of those “truths” that continues to circulate even if wrong.

Here is some info from the Permatex website:.
****************************
“Permatex Dielectric Tune-up Grease - Technical Data Sheet

1. For connectors and battery terminals
2. Make sure the ignition system is off.
3.Clean surfaces with appropriate cleaner such as Permatex Brake and Parts Cleaner or Battery Cleaner.
4.Coat both parts with grease.
Also from their web site
Directions for Connectors:

  1. Make sure ignition system is off.
  2. Clean surface with Permatex® Contact Cleaner.
  3. Coat both parts of terminal contact with Dielectric Grease.
  4. Reassemble, maintaining metal-to-metal contact.
********************************************** Dug this up from a “Product Safety Recall” for a Chev Malibu
“On these vehicles, over time an increased resistance can develop in the Body Control Module (BCM) connection system and result in voltage fluctuations or intermittency in the Brake Apply Sensor (BAS) circuit that can cause service brake lamp malfunction. “

Apply the dielectric lubricant (clear gel), GM P/N 12377900 (in Canada, use P/N
10953529), completely across all of the terminal pins in the BCM.

Use a one-inch nylon bristle brush to spread the lubricant evenly onto all terminal pins.

Again using the applicator stick, apply a 10 mm dab of dielectric lubricant completely
across the connector face of the BCM connector.

Use a one-inch nylon bristle brush to spread the lubricant evenly into all terminal holes
******************
So Cheviot fixed a problem by drowning the connectors in Dielectric Lub:)


If you look at the Wing contacts, you can see the scrap marks where the metal to metal contacts is made, That would wipe off the goo!!


I have a high end ohmmeter and I'll takes some reading first without lube and then after the lube is applied.


Actually, Chevrolet didn’t. I own one of these cars and after the dealer performed this procedure, I have had to pull and reseat these connectors 3 times to correct issues with the lighting system. I have used dielectric grease for years, but never directly on the pins of a connector, only on the connector itself to create a water resistant barrier to external moisture. I use it on the rubber gasket if the connector has one and only on the wire side of the connector if there’s no gasket. It doesn’t hurt anything to pack some grease in between the wires from the top and bottom of those connectors while they are firmly connected. Don’t know how effective it will be, but it will be nice and messy! :grin2:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,105 Posts
Your working on an 02 wing like I have and it sounds like you're just getting an electrical problem in a formerly ungreased connector. That's 17 years of exposure to the world and ya have a bit of dust/dirt in there. I'd clean them out with spray electrical cleaner like CRC and air hose them, clip them back together and not worry about it for 17 more.

I seriously think you'll be cussing yourself if you grease them up. Aged, drying, cold switch grease is what causes a lot of our bike's stuck switch issues but they need lubrication, I sure wouldn't add grease to static connectors that are not directly open to the environment.

Sent from my Moto Z (2) using Tapatalk
 

·
Vendor
Joined
·
17,821 Posts
I'd suggest using nothing. On Wing that I work on where someone has used it, the grease often collects contamination around it. When reconnecting a connector with grease on it, special care must be used to not "drag" and contamination and particles in the connector. That can be easier said than done. On 5th gens, often reconnecting is done by feel since space on Wings is tight.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
419 Posts
Your observation is that there is a lot of dust and dirt on the connector.

Nothing collects dust and dirt better than ...... grease. What took years to build up on that connector with no grease, will be right back there in one year with grease. Find a better way to keep the dust out. Even if it is just good old fashioned tape and a plastic bag.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
216 Posts
Discussion Starter #11
100% agree - it is a mess. And I can deal with that mess when I'm home with a cold beer working on my Wing.



And I appreciate your warnings, but I'm trying to prevent a terminal failure when I'm on a trip out to Utah. Recall all those C5 and C25 failures!! Not pretty.



I lost my low beams due to a terminal failure after 10 years and 100k miles. See burned out junction picture.


I tested C25 today both with and without the dielectric grease with a Fluke 77 meter. I loaded it up with grease. See male and female pics. No difference in resistance readings.



The reason for the grease is to surround the terminals so that they are insulated from atmospheric oxygen. No oxygen - no oxidation!


**********************************



One respondent felt that the Chev recall was faulty. I suspect that there was a lot of testing by Chev before they rolled it out - they had the Feds on their back.


I have put that Product Safety Recall up on my Google drive and you can check it out - plus see all the grease they used. Reach it at:
https://drive.google.com/open?id=1F77q3jdLfMlRHOsTuGPTj_zAUqNYxo5a


Possibly the respondent had another problem and didn't realize it - it happens.


So this is my Dielectric Grease story and I'm sticking to it:)
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
216 Posts
Discussion Starter #12
To GoldWingrGreg
Agreed with you on the usual connectors. Only an insane compulsive-obsessive would open these every 75-100k miles.



At my age this is probably the last time they will see the light of day.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
216 Posts
Discussion Starter #13
to PastoT


This is no ordinary grease like that wheel axle stuff we used on our switches:)
ACDelco 10-4071 Dielectric Grease - 2 oz at $19.28 at Amazon. Doesn't harden - totally inert.





 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,665 Posts
2002 Wing... I have ACDelco Dielectric Lubricant and am inclined to use it to pack the junctions...Any strong opinions??

I routinely Dis-assemble ALL the electrical connections on a new-to-me vehicle and pack them with Die-electric Grease. This accomplishes:
-An opportunity to Clean the connector (prior to re-assembly)
-The Grease waterproofs the connector
-The Grease makes future dis-assembly a breeze.


So far as the comment about "Grease attracting dirt"... So what; simply wipe off the grease/dirt prior to dis-assembly (and re-cleaning the interior terminal connections after opening, each time)


I go through ~3 tubes of die-electric grease every year... amounts to 1,000's of connections; Luv it!


Lastly, the grease get's Wiped-Off the terminal Connections during Assembly... Hence if a problem appears After you've applied the grease, then it was already there before. Typical example would be a Loose Connection, in which case, you need to fix that anyhow (and don't blame the grease as the culprit)
 

·
Vendor
Joined
·
17,821 Posts
I might that many of our connections are already weather proof. They have orange/black seals to help with that. On some I've seen those seals begin to swell with what appears to be di-electric grease on them. Putting them back together can be impossible unless the seal is removed.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,969 Posts
If you must, open the connectors, clean the metal male/female connectors, close the connector and put just enough high quality electrical tape around the connector to keep moisture and dirt out but don't use any more tape than necessary. One nice clean wrap once around so you can disconnect quickly will do nicely. If totally anal, you can also wrap the wires close to the connectors on both sides to help keep stuff out and reinforce the strength of the point where the wires enter the connectors.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
216 Posts
Discussion Starter #17
It is not the dirt itself that concerns me; it is copper corrosion of the contacts by the combination of oxygen and moisture (H2O). This turns copper to copper oxide which is a poor electrical conductor and introduces resistance. The same amperage across the increased resistance causes heat which also increases the rate of corrosion. The heat softens the plastic support and the junction ultimately fails with telltale signs of plastic damage. Connectors, such as C5 and C25, usually show failure by burnt areas.

The Dielectric Grease should surround the junction contact area directly to eliminate any moisture penetration. Copper corrosion requires both moisture and oxygen.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,792 Posts
I might that many of our connections are already weather proof. They have orange/black seals to help with that. On some I've seen those seals begin to swell with what appears to be di-electric grease on them. Putting them back together can be impossible unless the seal is removed.

I once added some Dielectric grease to an o ring sealed connector. When I went to take it apart the seal was loose and stretched out of shape.

No more dielectric grease for me.
I only use the Dexoit D5 for cleaning and protecting the connections.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,665 Posts
...put just enough high quality electrical tape around the connector to keep moisture and dirt out but don't use any more tape than necessary. One nice clean wrap once around so you can disconnect quickly will do nicely....

No way, no how are you going to Keep Moisture Out using electrical tape... That would be as futile as trying to build a Balloon out of electrical tape.


Beyond that, if you wrap with tape, then you'd just as easily be Locking Moisture *IN* the joint, as anything that weeps into the joint is now less likely to Evaporate, since Less Exposure to ambient heat and air flow.


In contrast, Die-electric Grease not only SEALS the joint from Moisture, but also Repeals Water... so that it won't collect on the joint.
 
1 - 20 of 31 Posts
Top