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Discussion Starter #1
On another thread I noticed Waldo's good advice to use a particular sized Phillips bit on a certain screw on the GL1800. Recently, on aanother MC related board the wrenches were helping folks who were all too commonly stripping the heads of "Phillips" screws on Japaneese bikes. Turns-out that the Japaneese have their own standards for such hardware and it is different than our standars, thus the bits do not fit precisely. They look the same, the bits seem to fit, but they do not fit well and tend to ride out under torque. The correct bits are not easily found here, but they are called "JIS". Google turns-up some handy references. The Honda tool kiit should have the right ones, but those are so poorly handled. Anyone find a nice set of the JIS bits to fit our SAE handles or socket extensions or impact drivers?

http://www.instructables.com/id/When_a_Phillips_is_not_a_Phillips/

http://forums.sohc4.net/index.php?topic=26894.0;prev_next=next

prs
 

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It never ceases to amaze me how difficult human beings make life. I can only assume that governemnt got involved, somehow!! Anyway, I did a search and found this site... http://www.rjrcooltools.com/vessel.cfm , That looks like something that might come in handy.

I may flip for a set, unless someone comes up with something better or cheaper.
 

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I have a complete set of JIS screwdrivers, and they do make a difference. Some of the screw on my Kawasaki (that have locktite on them) can only be removed with these screwdrivers. Anything less will round out the heads.

What size(s) did you get?
 

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One of two thoughts come to mind, someone makes the screw and their brother-in-law makes the screw driver, the other is mother Honda they don't want us to work on our own bike, different screw "oh you need to take that to the dealer they can do it for $85.00 an hour.
 

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One can attain nearly the same result by grinding the tip off a regular #2 phillips. Operative word here is "NEARLY." Just need to take off a little, not much.

Of course, the proper bit is always better. I have several several several ¼" drive bit sets for my power screwdrivers and the ones that fit have a flat tip on them.

These are my newest power drivers and the driver will run 4" deck screws for hours before needing a recharge. The impact is invaluable, especially for breaking loose the factory screws that are frozen in place from dissimilar metal fusion. Excellent if you don't have air impacts.

They are Makita LCT203W. I got a refurb set from Tool King for $140 but they seem to be out of them. They are $179 at lowes. I haven't touched my Craftsman 19 v humongous heavy driver since Christmas.

http://tools.toolking.com/search?w=Makita+LCT203W

 

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It's not a conspiracy nor a get-rich-quick scheme. The JIS cross-recess and the ANSI cross-recess (and the DIN cross-recess, for that matter) have NEVER been exactly the same. Nor has there ever been any been any requirement for them to be the same. That's just the state of the world.
 

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Maybe thats why so many guys stripped the screws when pulling their fly's. :idea:
I have been telling folks to order these screwdrivers BEFORE attempting to remove the secondary butterflies for over a year now. They only catch is that they work so well, some folks are now actually twisting the heads right off the screws. But hey, at least they aren't rounding them out.
 

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The American equivalent is called a "Forstner" bit available from Sears, Snap-on or any good tool supplier.
 

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The American equivalent is called a "Forstner" bit available from Sears, Snap-on or any good tool supplier.
????

I have Forstner bits for drilling holes in wood. I have asked Snap On for JIS screwdrivers and the answer was no. I have found that PosiDriv drivers fit Japanese screws better than Phillips screwdrivers.
 

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I bought a complete set of JIS screwdrivers and recomend them highly.

Be careful with them though, they give Great bite (Do Not Overtighten)

......Don
 

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Japanese and American Philips screws are very close. Most American made screwdrivers are ground so poorly that if you dig through your toolbox, you will usually find one that fits perfectly. The biggest difference is in the grind of the tip. Pointy screwdrivers won't work. All you have to do is grind the tip off a little bit, and they fit perfectly.

In consumer electronics, we have to be very careful about the screwdrivers we use, because many of the screws are cosmetic, and made of soft metal. Electronics screwdrivers are generally ground much more precisely than mechanics screwdrivers. Excelite, Paladin, Wiha, and Jensen are the most common brands used in electronics.

Don't use Snap-on screwdrivers on metric bikes, or Japanese electronics.

Trying to find JIS power bits for cordless screwdrivers is quite a bit more difficult.

JIS screwdrivers, also commonly known as ISO, fit perfectly in American screws. I think they work even better.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
????

I have Forstner bits for drilling holes in wood. I have asked Snap On for JIS screwdrivers and the answer was no. I have found that PosiDriv drivers fit Japanese screws better than Phillips screwdrivers.

Same comment, Forstner bits make nice clean flat bottomed holes in wood. But, I will search for screw drivers under that term.

prs
 

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there was another thread about JIS screwdrivers quite a while ago

someone recomended ordering from somewhere in illinois so i ordered a couple JIS screwdrivers, the ones i got are good quality, made in Germany, they do seem to work very good on the wing
 

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Fred, Do you know if you can get these magnetized ?
Just get a magnet and stick it to the shank of the screwdriver near the handle. Now slide it along the shank until you slide it all the way off the end. Stick it back on near the handle again and repeat a few times. The screwdriver will now be magnetized.
Ralph Wenzl
 
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