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I may need to rebuild the forks in the 08 Goldwing in the near future as I see a small amount of oil on the tube after a ride. Getting to the lower pinch bolts is easy, but the top one is not. From above, there is not enough room to turn it with either an allen wrench or a mini socket. Same problem from below. I tried moving the wheel but that did not help. Is removing the shelter(groan) an option?
Gerald
Gear shift Automotive design Motor vehicle Finger Gadget
Gear shift Automotive design Motor vehicle Finger Gadget
 

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I used a 12mm short socket and a 1/4" flex head ratchet to gain access. As I recall, they are not torqued to an ungodly tightness.
 

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To get to the upper bolts, do the following:
  • remove the meter panel
  • remove the fork cover
  • remove plastic caps at the base of the handle bars, and remove both rear bolts
  • loosen the front handle bar bolts
  • with an allen socket, that should give you the room needed. Don't forget that you can piviot the forks from side to side for more access
 

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Gerald: Your trike has a front end rake kit on it and it has allen head pinch bolts, should be hex head (factory) which is easy to get wrench on and loosen. Looks like you may have to get creative to get a allen socket in there or take some stuff off to get to them. You could call a trike installer and ask them how they get them loose. Hope this helps good luck.. Someone that has a similar set-up may come on board with a suggestion!!!..
 

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When I had to work on the forks on my CSC Viper, I had the same issue about accessing those bolts. I ended up finding some Allen bit sockets that were small enough using a 1/4 ratchet. The first time I did it, I found the installer had really cranked on those bolts and they were a bear to loosen. When I retightened them, I did make them tight but not as ham fisted tight as I found them. I thought I purchased the set from Harbor Freight but can't find them there now. This set from Amazon is very similar:
NEIKO 01141B Allen Bit Socket Set | 14 Piece | MM | 2.5mm to 19mm | 1/4", 3/8" and 1/2" Drive | Cr-Mo Impact Grade https://smile.amazon.com/dp/B00ED2S8ZU/ref=cm_sw_r_apan_glt_fabc_V526BJ8NSKZXZZNY3T85

And just like you are finding, room to do this is very limited and was hard to get it started. If I remember correctly, I think I had to add an extension onto the ratchet handle to give me a little more power. Maybe a small pipe that fit??? And I could only move the ratchet a little at the time but it did finally loosen.
 

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An allen key socket set should have allen keys in a socket that you can put your I/4" or 3/8" ratchet into ?
There are also ball ended allen keys that allow you to enter the head of an allen screw at an angle.
Use a small piece of pipe for extra leverage if needed.
 

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I may need to rebuild the forks in the 08 Goldwing in the near future as I see a small amount of oil on the tube after a ride. Getting to the lower pinch bolts is easy, but the top one is not. From above, there is not enough room to turn it with either an allen wrench or a mini socket. Same problem from below. I tried moving the wheel but that did not help. Is removing the shelter(groan) an option?
Gerald View attachment 391162 View attachment 391162
I believe the Allen head bolts would allow easier access to Loosening and tightening. Once you figure out the perfect tool for you. Allen head bits and 1/4” drive sockets/swivels/etc will be the winning combination.
 

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I know it's a bit late and not sure if you were able to tackle this yet but I found where I bought those hex sockets. They are stubby sockets that I bought at O'Reilly Auto parts.

 
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I know it's an old thread but I'll follow up on this too since it's been brought to the top.

There is sufficient access for a combination spanner and you can gain extra leverage with a second one.
It's a wee trick I often use if a bolt is just that little bit tight and there's a risk of skinned knuckles.

It's worth mentioning that slackening the top fork cap before releasing the lower fork clamp bolt will save grief later. Having the top clamp bolt tight also squeezes the tube and it grips the cap thread tightly so slacken that first.
The plastic cover over the cap can be bent upwards to gain access without damage.
 

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