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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
I just replaced the plug wires and coils on an 08 this past week, and I just wanted to comment that I'm starting to see more and more bikes develop problems with cracked and leaking plug wires. This typically shows up as a miss under load and/or a poor idle, and will get worse when ridden in the rain. As these bikes get older, the plug wires start to leak high voltage and the only solution is to replace them. It probably isn't a bad idea to also replace the coils while you are in there, since it is a lot of work to get to them. Some folks have done it from the front of the bike, but this is nearly impossible on an ABS bike, and I find it easier to just pull out the gas tank and air box and do it right. There also is a cable clip above the coils that the holds two of the plug wires and I don't think you'll get them back in this clip if you're working from the front.

The outside wires on the two end coils (plug wires #5 and #2) are routed so that the wire bends 180 degrees after it comes out of the coil to route it back to the other side. This is where I'm typically finding a lot of breaks in the wire insulation and evidence of high voltage leakage.
 

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Thanks for the pics Fred. I'm thinking of the same operation on my 02. I replaced the coils last year and that helped what I was experiencing occasionally. Also noted my iridium plugs were in their afterlife. Strangely I just replaced them again as half of them nearly burnt the origin wire clean off in less than a year. Running well again but figured the plug wires are next in line for replacement.

Sent from my Moto Z (2) using Tapatalk
 
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Also noted my iridium plugs were in their afterlife. Strangely I just replaced them again as half of them nearly burnt the origin wire clean off in less than a year.
Others report problems with iridiums too. You will probably find better results when use the spark plugs Honda calls for. I too replace plug wires on the older Wings, and a coil(s) when needed. All are kept in stock.
 

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Oh, dang, Fred... I have an 08... something else failing to look forward to. I'll have to leave this repair to the pros, have no desire to tackle that myself.

So, Greg, good advice. Why do people insist on using parts, fluids etc that Honda does NOT recommend???.... it is a mystery................ :shrug:

"Things" getting older and parts failing....... as a doctor, I see it everyday.........:frown2:
 

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I agree with changing the wires and now looks like that will go on my to do list for winter maintenance on my 07 but the coils ? I know because your there but the coils seem they should last the life of the bike. Thanks.
 

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I had an 05, I sold last September, and it had a hesitation and no one could figure out what it was.
It was at 2400 - 2800 rpms in 3rd and 4th gear under acceleration. I could make it hesitate, it wasn't a constant hesitation and most of the time under normal riding, you never felt it.

It felt like when you are riding in the wind and a gust of wind temporarily pushes on the bike, in fact at first, that is what I thought it was until it kept happening and it was not a windy day.

I am wondering if it may have had a bad spark plug wire, but it would cause problems all the time, wouldn't it?

The tricky part was it only happened at the above rpms and in those gears.
Other than that, the engine ran fine.
 

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I agree with changing the wires and now looks like that will go on my to do list for winter maintenance on my 07 but the coils ? I know because your there but the coils seem they should last the life of the bike. Thanks.
For the most part coils do last a "life time." Usually what causes coils to go bad is high resistance in spark plugs or plug wires. Instead of the voltage traveling down the plug wire and jumping the spark plug's gap, it will find an easier path and the voltage will spark to ground. If that happens at the coil tower, that's a bad coil. The carbon trace is usually easy to see.

I believe I posted a picture once of a carbon trail on a 5th gen coil tower but currently cannot find it.

I've never seen a Wing needing 3 coils. With proper test equipment, one can test the high voltage side of the ignition system, and go from there, as well as doing a visual inspection when replacing the plug wires. Another easy way to test is with test coils such as these. But the shop would pretty much need to specialize to have a set of them. Here's is a set I sometimes use.
 

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I had an 05, I sold last September, and it had a hesitation and no one could figure out what it was.
It was at 2400 - 2800 rpms in 3rd and 4th gear under acceleration. I could make it hesitate, it wasn't a constant hesitation and most of the time under normal riding, you never felt it.

It felt like when you are riding in the wind and a gust of wind temporarily pushes on the bike, in fact at first, that is what I thought it was until it kept happening and it was not a windy day.

I am wondering if it may have had a bad spark plug wire, but it would cause problems all the time, wouldn't it?

The tricky part was it only happened at the above rpms and in those gears.
Other than that, the engine ran fine.
That would be a situation where the best way to test for that is to install known good set of test coils and plug wires as shown in post #8. However, it takes a real specialty repair shop for that type of testing. Other shops will replace with all new "everything" in hopes that replacing "something" might get rid of your issue ... in the repair world, such shops are known as parts hangers. Often that repair is far more expensive, and sometimes does not work. Often the customer leaves disappointed wondering why he just spent that money.
 

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For the most part coils do last a "life time." Usually what causes coils to go bad is high resistance in spark plugs or plug wires. Instead of the voltage traveling down the plug wire and jumping the spark plug's gap, it will find an easier path and the voltage will spark to ground. If that happens at the coil tower, that's a bad coil. The carbon trace is usually easy to see.

I believe I posted a picture once of a carbon trail on a 5th gen coil tower but currently cannot find it.

I've never seen a Wing needing 3 coils. With proper test equipment, one can test the high voltage side of the ignition system, and go from there, as well as doing a visual inspection when replacing the plug wires. Another easy way to test is with test coils such as these. But the shop would pretty much need to specialize to have a set of them. Here's is a set I sometimes use.
I agree and might add that running spark plugs beyond their recommended gap setting also stresses the coils. The coils have to work harder electrically to jump the larger gap.
 

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I bought an 08 yrs ago that was in front end wreck . Bike would start cold with fresh plugs . After going thru whole bike it came back that "all 3" (3) coils were bad . They would send spark to get it started if all was "fresh" but soon as it warmed up would die !! Put coils on it and drove 60,000 plus miles . Sold it to a friend and still going strong .
 
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I used to take old cars and park them in the dark and spray water up and down wires at night and if wires starting to fail would a good "electrical " show !
 

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I bought an 08 yrs ago that was in front end wreck . Bike would start cold with fresh plugs . After going thru whole bike it came back that "all 3" (3) coils were bad . They would send spark to get it started if all was "fresh" but soon as it warmed up would die !! Put coils on it and drove 60,000 plus miles . Sold it to a friend and still going strong .
I remember that bike, and seem to remember you wondering if the coils had been switch out prior to you buying it, or possibly they were damaged from the accident.
 

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Here is number 5 plug wire, cracked and split where it makes the 180 degree bend after it comes out of the coil.
Thanks for posting Fred, assuming all is well no cracks in wires would a spraying with silicone spray to wires help in keeping them pliable to prevent cracking?
Joe
 

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Darn, I see several mentions of problems with iridium plugs here and, wouldn't ya know it, I just bought a set today. Oh well. Will put them in and see.
 
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Why would iridium plugs make a difference? so long as they are the same brand and designed for the Gl1800 1832, the only difference is the material of the metal, which should last longer, and take more time to increase the gap? Just inquiring not arguing?
 

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Why would iridium plugs make a difference? so long as they are the same brand and designed for the Gl1800 1832, the only difference is the material of the metal, which should last longer, and take more time to increase the gap? Just inquiring not arguing?
The point as I see it is that the Iridium version of the stock plug IS NOT recommended or designed for the 1832.
If it were, why isn't it listed in the owner's and service manuals?
In fact, AFAIK, the 1832's came from the factory with Denso plugs (K20PR-U11), not NGK.
I know mine did.
The manuals list the acceptable NGK plug as a BKR6E-11.

The Iridium version of the BKR6E-11 is the BKR6EIX-11.
Yes, the IX Iridium version should be a direct replacement for the BKR6E-11, according to NGK, but not necessarily according to Honda.
Unless one has access to the engineering specs of both plugs, it is impossible to say that these plugs offer identical performance, burn characteristics, trigger voltages, terminal erosion, etc.
I have run one set of iridiums in my bike, but for only 10k km.
But as soon as I heard from the experts who work on these bikes for a living that they have seen issues with Iridiums in the 1832, I went back immediately to stock plugs.
At the end of the day the decision is yours, but to spend double to triple the cost of stock plugs for Iridiums that may be detrimental to the long term life of the engine or ignition system is a poor decision in my book.
 

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I want to thank Fred for working on my 08 last week. I think the 1600 mile round trip was worth it. You can read my story on the Texas forum. I truly believe replacing all 3 components was the best option in my opinion.
 

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Why would iridium plugs make a difference? so long as they are the same brand and designed for the Gl1800 1832, the only difference is the material of the metal, which should last longer, and take more time to increase the gap? Just inquiring not arguing?
I don't know ... but I do know that Honda did not choose to use them on the 6th gen either.
 

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I had replied over a year ago to Greg, that I had taken an iridium plug out with no little tiny center electrode. The gap on that plug was huge. It was an NGK too!. I run the regular ones.
 
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