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How do you use Body English to make the Big Girl dance?

  • I lean my upper body IN before turning.

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • I grip the TANK with my knees when braking.

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • I hang a TOE off as a feeler gage.

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • I lean FORWARD to make sure my elbows are bent.

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • I actually HANG OFF in fast turns.

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • Are you NUTS? The GW ain't no race bike!

    Votes: 0 0.0%
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Discussion Starter #1
Please take the Body English poll above, then share how you use your body position to make the Big Girl dance.

  • What works for you?
  • What doesn't work?
  • What is too much trouble?
  • What makes riding effortless?
You may choose multiple answers. This poll is time limited so vote now.

Thanks.
 

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I have a bum (weak) left leg from an injury 3 years ago-- I CAN"T really hang off even if I wanted too! I do shift my weight as far as I can as needed from side to side. I have never done much analysis-- I just make sure I stay on the pavement. Leaving the road sucks, and HURTS!
 

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dancin

I have leaned my body way inside on a seriously surprising U-turn curve..
A friend explained that you use your hips to steer the big bikes..I'll buy that.
I do try and be concious of my posture. Too tense and fatigue sets in pretty fast..
It is a "touring bike" after all and most time is spent in a mile eating nearly straight up and down position, not looking for the best line in a 90 mph sweeper..
Oh, my bike seems to want to drift right when I am riding no handed, so body english is sometimes very necessary!
 

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curves

smoothest, most efficient way to carve a wing thru a mountain canyon is to sit relaxed in a neutral position, no hanging off or altered positioning, while pushing forward the handlebars slightly on which ever side you want to curve, the bike will respond in an amazingly nimble fashion, always maintain a neutral riding position so you can most easily react to obstacles, like sand, on the road...leaning all over does little to control the bike and mostly just puts you out of position for the next curve or quick stop, you do not want to create any more G-force in any direction than is necessary, let the bike do the work, you can grind the pegs right off it in comfortable control by using this "countersteering" pressure.
 

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My vote. Toe, Forward, Hang. Still holds a great line in a curve without having to scrape. A little more work than just sittin there, but hey, its fun.. :nojoke:
 

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None of the above.

Making a motorcycle turn at speed is a function of countersteering.

I sit up straight and press on the appropriate bar. The bike turns every time; as tight as I wish.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Great responses. Very interesting. Keep 'em coming. :thumbup:
 

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I have enough upper body mass (ok i am a fat f%&k) that it is quicker in rapid s turns to keep my body somewhat vertical and let the bike dance back and forth without me slowing it down.
 

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Making a motorcycle turn at speed is a function of countersteering.

I sit up straight and press on the appropriate bar. The bike turns every time; as tight as I wish.
:agree: I do one of the poll items, however ... I tend to ride with my feet on the pegs and my toes down ... this does tend to work like a curb/road feet ... if my toes touch, I'm about to be scraping peg.

As Joe said ... I sit upright and comfortable and will either push on the appropriate bar or ... on light curves ... I'll simple transfer weight (push down) with the appropriate foot.
 

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I am new here and should not be so pompous as to advise the senior members.

But, for you Wing newbies who might pass through here:

I am one tracking on learning to sling the Wing through curves without effort.:lol:

I have been practicing on a set of local curves . . . over and over . . . back and forth . . .

Study the Fuse/Yellow Wolf tape . . . go to the curves . . . back and forth . . .

I started out slow. . . a bit faster each run through . . . cutting time . . . cutting time . . . every time.

My defective good judgment genes kicked in, and I thought:

Okay, I got this. I'm gonna blast for Hell through there a few times, and I will have it down.

Hammer down baby!! Away we go!! Hammer down!! Yeah!!
:22yikes::22yikes::22yikes:

It was ugly, really, really ugly. I will never know what all happened inside that hell hole of a curve . . . . so don't know how I/the bike survived.

No memory about stuff like . . . tap the back brake . . . throttle control . . . relax the hands. Nothing guys . . . no recall . . . like temporary amnesia . . . Well, I believe I do recall thinking . . . "God almighty!!" . . . I don't know if that counts for praying.

I suspect old timers here would apply the techno term: Proper entry speed.

Got a bit cocky and asked too much of myself.

Might have demanded too much of the bike . . . the tires . . . I dunno yet.

May all Wingers always have proper entry speed.
 

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I didn't understand the dynamics of how body position works in corners until late last fall. It turns out that you get quite bit more ground clearance going through corners if you shift your body to the inside. That seems to cause the bike to stay a bit more upright giving you a little more inside ground clearance. That little extra will allow you to pick up the pace a bit without grinding pegs or scraping hard parts.

Try it and I think you'll be surprised by how much more upright your bike is when you shift your position to the inside. It still takes the same counter steering input to get the bike to turn, so all that really changes is the ground clearance.

Try it, you'll like it!
 

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I didn't understand the dynamics of how body position works in corners until late last fall. It turns out that you get quite bit more ground clearance going through corners if you shift your body to the inside. That seems to cause the bike to stay a bit more upright giving you a little more inside ground clearance. That little extra will allow you to pick up the pace a bit without grinding pegs or scraping hard parts.

Try it and I think you'll be surprised by how much more upright your bike is when you shift your position to the inside. It still takes the same counter steering input to get the bike to turn, so all that really changes is the ground clearance.

Try it, you'll like it!
+1
 

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3Chords .... not only do you have to plan your entry speed/path ... but you have to maintain concentration.
I've watched many people (and myself) "wobble" when they're concentrating on a tight/blind curve and suddenly an oncoming vehicle appears and breaks your concentration. Just takes a second's inattention/lapse.
I have had it happen many times on mountain curves where you see nothing of the road ahead ... just a small section of road. Going with the proven maxim that the bike goes where you're looking ... having that vehicle appear out of the blind corner grabs your attention ... and focus ... and suddenly your "watch where you're going" goes to hell.

Unlike a cage, it's seldom safe to be a sightseer on a bike.
 

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I am new here and should not be so pompous as to advise the senior members.

But, for you Wing newbies who might pass through here:

I am one tracking on learning to sling the Wing through curves without effort.:lol:

I have been practicing on a set of local curves . . . over and over . . . back and forth . . .

Study the Fuse/Yellow Wolf tape . . . go to the curves . . . back and forth . . .

I started out slow. . . a bit faster each run through . . . cutting time . . . cutting time . . . every time.

My defective good judgment genes kicked in, and I thought:

Okay, I got this. I'm gonna blast for Hell through there a few times, and I will have it down.

Hammer down baby!! Away we go!! Hammer down!! Yeah!!
:22yikes::22yikes::22yikes:

It was ugly, really, really ugly. I will never know what all happened inside that hell hole of a curve . . . . so don't know how I/the bike survived.

No memory about stuff like . . . tap the back brake . . . throttle control . . . relax the hands. Nothing guys . . . no recall . . . like temporary amnesia . . . Well, I believe I do recall thinking . . . "God almighty!!" . . . I don't know if that counts for praying.

I suspect old timers here would apply the techno term: Proper entry speed.

Got a bit cocky and asked too much of myself.

Might have demanded too much of the bike . . . the tires . . . I dunno yet.

May all Wingers always have proper entry speed.
:thumbup: I hope all is well, keep the rubber side down, works well. :lol:
 

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I didn't understand the dynamics of how body position works in corners until late last fall. It turns out that you get quite bit more ground clearance going through corners if you shift your body to the inside. That seems to cause the bike to stay a bit more upright giving you a little more inside ground clearance. That little extra will allow you to pick up the pace a bit without grinding pegs or scraping hard parts.

Try it and I think you'll be surprised by how much more upright your bike is when you shift your position to the inside. It still takes the same counter steering input to get the bike to turn, so all that really changes is the ground clearance.

Try it, you'll like it!
Please explain...

If the bike stays "a bit more upright giving you a little more inside ground clearance...", how does the bike turn?

To turn, the bike must lean. Less lean, causes less tight turns.

Whether you press the appropriate bar, or force the bike over with body english, a very specific amount of lean is required to make a particular turn.
 

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What are you guys talking about? :eek:4: Go fast thru turns, leaning off, scrapping parts, more ground clearance.......OMG. :22yikes:

No, sir, not me. I'll stick to the GWRRA after-lunch pace.:yes1:
 

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3Chords .... not only do you have to plan your entry speed/path ... but you have to maintain concentration.
I've watched many people (and myself) "wobble" when they're concentrating on a tight/blind curve and suddenly an oncoming vehicle appears and breaks your concentration. Just takes a second's inattention/lapse.
I have had it happen many times on mountain curves where you see nothing of the road ahead ... just a small section of road. Going with the proven maxim that the bike goes where you're looking ... having that vehicle appear out of the blind corner grabs your attention ... and focus ... and suddenly your "watch where you're going" goes to hell.

Unlike a cage, it's seldom safe to be a sightseer on a bike.
Thanks OrangeCrush! I am mature enough now to respect the advice of men/women who have more knowledge and experience than I. That maturity did come late I suppose.

Been riding KLR thumpers for several years now, and I do okay in curves with them . . . but you know a healthy jackrabbit might pass you up in a curve when you are riding one of those things. The KLR does not accelerate coming out of a curve. . . it slowly gains a bit of momentum. I have learned my lesson . . . The Goldwing is not the fastest bike . . . but they are powerful enough to take you into a curve hot . . . much, much too hot!!

You know I read one of your posts where you mentioned the plastic would become a bit brittle below 20 degrees. I could not tell if you were joking or not. Not that it would be a problem in Texas at the present time.

Have a great evening OrangeCrush.
 

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:thumbup: I hope all is well, keep the rubber side down, works well. :lol:
Kit Carson!! :cool:

Yes, all is well. Thanks!

You know Kit Carson, contrary to popular belief, I believe it is not the stupid ones (such as I) who are managing to kill themselves off. It's the intelligent ones with good sense who end up with their rubber sticking up in the air. Well that is what I try to tell myself anyway.

I read your posts Kit Carson!!
 

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35mph all day, all the time!
 
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