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HAVE OU EVER HAD A BLOWOUT ON YOUR WING, NOT A FLAT BUT AN ACTUAL BLOWOUT

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Dale C

There in lies the problem for me.. Those very well designed motorcycle tires just are not up to the job .... My Avon looked like that but it went ahead and blew out.

I can slow down a bit in the twisties if I can prevent that by using a much stronger tire.

JMHO 8)
 

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Maybe so Tom, I'm just not convinced the "dark side" holds the answer to this kind of problem. That was a long long time ago and about 100,000 miles so I have learned from that experience and gained from it. It would be one thing if the manufacturers came out and gave other tires the good seal of approval and/or said they were a viable option, but they haven't and there will have to be a lot more reports and testing to convince me it holds some promise. I'm also satisfied with how the tires I use now perform and what I can expect from them.

Right now, I feel with everyday checking of tire pressure, and far more thorough checking of my tires and tire mileage I will avoid this kind of problem, but I also watch which tire brands I use and what I put on my bike too. My dark side might consist of going to the 70 series tire for my rear tire, but I doubt that I'll ever install a auto tire on my Wing. In fact, I could almost guarantee it for right now. With more experience and miles, I've gained a lot more experience on what works best for me and most importantly when I need to install new tires. Fortunately with many long trips under my belt it has worked a lot better.

DaleC
 

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Dale C

Dark siding is no different than changing out the exhaust system, or suspension system or using Mobile1 Synthetic oil.. Just a personal choice thingy....

A lot of people use non approved brake pads also. A lot of people do not use approved fuel grades. Book calls for 87 octane and a lot of folks will run 91 or 93 octane.

Merry Christmas and a Happy New Years to you and yours 8)
 

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George said:

"No blow out's in 25 years.
One thing I do find interesting.......
None of these stories tell of having the bike go down......
Luck?
Skill?
Combination of both???
One would think that a blow out on a bike would result in a lay-down.
NOT looking forward to ever having one to test my luck or skill."


Now that the trolls have backed off and there are some people here that seem to know something. I would like to pose this question.

George, Max, and Tom, Looking at the blowouts that Mike and Dale had the bikes stayed up (not fun I am sure, but stayed up). The question is why and would the same results have been had if they were on a CT?

I maintain that the design of the mt aids in the abilith to keep the tire on the rim. If you look at a cross section of the mt the curved tread becomes a craddle for the rim when the air leaves the tire. This in MHO is a very important safety feature of the mt.

On the CT when air is lost the tread will flatten out and there is nothing to keep the rim from sliding off the tread and causing it to run off the rim.

I think another thing that plays into this is the mt sidewalls are very short and stiff and that aids in keeping the rim in the craddle of the tread. On the ct the sidwalls are softer and wider and give the rim more room to move sideways.

Just something to ponder. Opinions please.
 

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Dive Master

The Avon that blew out on me was a early model, less side wall material and it did swap around a bit.

The new wheel and tires do stay on the rim much better than in the old days.

I have only ridden on fairly late model radial car tires, they will hold the bike up very well with zero air pressure. You can feel the softness as it will roll around a bit, but it does not feel unsafe. I punctured my car tire and rode it about 15 miles home with zero air pressure in it, It was not even very warm when I got there.

I also believe that on a back tire blow out, it is pretty easy to keep the bike up right and bring it to a stop. If you pay attention during a blow out, you will notice that the rear end is all over the place but the front stays very steady and you just steer it to a stop.

If you go to www.ka7w.com and click on the picture album page. Then go to the car tire page, you will see how short the side wall on the car tire is. The size of that tire is 195/50R16.

Hope this helps a bit 8)
 

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I can't agree or disagree with the fact that either would be easier/harder to control if it went flat. As long as it's the rear, you should be able to get it stopped.

I haven't seen if the CT bead snaps into the bead of the rim (completely) like a MC tire does (and is designed to), but if it doesn't, then that would be another reason not to run a CT. A blown out tire is not easy to ride to a stop, but if the tire comes off the rim, you could end up crashing. Aluminum offers little traction... :lol:

I do think they should make a run flat MC tire. That would be a big jump on safety. (or do they, and I just don't know about it?).
 

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Dive Master said:
Now that the trolls have backed off and there are some people here that seem to know something. I would like to pose this question.

George, Max, and Tom, Looking at the blowouts that Mike and Dale had the bikes stayed up (not fun I am sure, but stayed up). The question is why and would the same results have been had if they were on a CT?

Just something to ponder. Opinions please.
Don;
Many people on this forum make changes to the 1800 but I do not.
I am fine with maintaining my bike the way Mother Honda designed it.
A Car Tire for me? Never. I also use the oil and filters that are designated.
If others want to alter the bike then fine. That is one of the many things that make this forum interesting.
 

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Discussion Starter · #48 ·
:D
 

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KA7W said:
A lot of people use non approved brake pads also
You mean there's car brake pads that'll fit a Goldwing??? :shock: :shock: Where do I get some.. They've got to be better than Motorcycle brake pads!!!
 

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DaleC said:
Right now, I feel with everyday checking of tire pressure, and far more thorough checking of my tires and tire mileage I will avoid this kind of problem, but I also watch which tire brands I use and what I put on my bike too.
Dale, would you say that the tire that blew out was worn well beyond what you'd NOW consider safe?? The pics show a tire that was pretty well worn... To be honest, the GL rear tire is difficult to judge unless you really look closely, I've been caught a couple of times with a tire that was actually worse than it looked on a casual spin check!!
 

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PunkinWing said:
Dale, would you say that the tire that blew out was worn well beyond what you'd NOW consider safe?? The pics show a tire that was pretty well worn... To be honest, the GL rear tire is difficult to judge unless you really look closely, I've been caught a couple of times with a tire that was actually worse than it looked on a casual spin check!!
Well I have thought about that whole situation many many times and I can only say yes, it was much too worn, but that last day must have seen a lot more wear than I would have ever guessed. Like I mentioned, we probably did close to 700 miles that day (along with each of the preceding few days). I just had made the incorrect assumption the tire would easily last until I got back home to the Bay area and that didn't happen by a long ways. There may have been some unusual wear that was caused by a couple of sections of road that had been ground down for repaving and I may have ridden over that too fast for many many miles and that took a bigger toll on the tread than I would have guessed, I just don't know.

What I do know is that on another set of tires I went out on a day ride of about 300 miles and prior to leaving my house checked the tires and noted that my rear tire was not down to the wear bar (and I assumed safe to ride for the day), but when I got home after the 300 miles the rear tire was worn down to the point the cords were showing. The point being that that last bit of tread on a tire can really go down very very quickly. I no longer wear my rear tire down to the wear bars for the kind of riding I do and day trips that I take. It simply isn't worth the risk or worry, and I will change out a tire, especially the rear, when it gets anywhere close to being above the wear bars.

I also remember the replacement tires (some D250's) since they were the only tires available at that dealer (I took the last set at that dealer), was the most expensive set of tires that I every purchased. I was certainly very lucky that day and I could have easily blown that tire earlier in the day probably 80 miles away from any civilization and while I was going quite fast. It also could have been a horrible accident waiting to happen. In my case, I pulled off the road, the tire didn't loose air at all, and it turned out I was about 1000 or 1500 feet from the dealers, and I could ride the bike at about 5 mph all the way to the dealers rear door. And as I mentioned, the dealer opened his doors on a day they were normally closed so I could get a new set installed on my bike and I could continue my vacation trip. You just don't get any luckier that that. I was very Thankful that day, for many many reasons!!!

DaleC
 

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Punkinwing

Yes, they were car brake pads, they were made by EBC and sold for Goldwings. They are NOT listed in the Happy Honda Manual.. They were sized to fit several bikes and cars. Actually work good and are pretty cheap compared to Honda. But I am back to using the expensive Honda pads.

Dale C

The one tire of mine that went away so quick also was above the wear bars that day... When it blew, there was no rubber in the center of the tire, just torn up cords. About 300 miles from above the wear bars to splitting the carcus...

I have inspected a lot of m/c tires and if you look at them just prior to being replaced, you will notice the thickness of the rubber is not constant around the whole tire, it will vary several thousands.. I don't know if that is because of manufacturing tolerances or the way they wear. I need to wear a car tire completely out and look at it.


JMHO 8)
 

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Dale C and KWA7

Your tire Dale makes my point once again...Darksiding may not be the total answer, but these tires we are riding on are inadequate for the Wingabeging through the country....

THEY ARE TOO GOLDAMN SMALL, THEY DONT HAVE DEEP ENOUGH TREAD, THEY ARE TOO THING OF CARCASS, TOO HARD OF MATERIAL, TOO UNCOMFORTABLE AND TOO NARROW...AND APPARENTLY, THEY DONT LAST....when you say you have to take tires with on a trip that spells: I dont trust my tires!

I find it difficult to accept that one has to plan a trip around where to make tire changes...that is ridiculous!...

Friends and neighbors, you may argue all you want about lightsiding or darksiding, BUT WE ARE DIRE NEED OF WELL DESIGNED TOURING TIRE!!!! :x
 

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Nando said:
I find it difficult to accept that one has to plan a trip around where to make tire changes...that is ridiculous!...
Well, I don't know about you, but I do my traveling by car (in my case, my SUV) a lot differently than I do when I ride my Wing. If I ride my Wing I will always, always travel the long way or route as opposed o the most direct direct route with my vehicle. As example, this year I shall be driving up to Oregon to see some relatives for Christmas. Last year and for that matter the last few times I did it on my Wing and in every single case the mileage by my 1800 is about 2 to 2 1/2 times what it will be when I drive. That kind of pattern is consistant and I always take the most indirect route when I travel by bike, along with the fact the roads are not nearly as modern or level or smooth. Granted I don't get the mileage out of my motorcycle tires that I do with my vehicle tires, but I have long since grown to expect that and plan for it accordingly. That planning goes also into managing my tire tread so I have the maximum tread for all of my longer trips. I've also found that it is pretty easy since I change my motorcycle tires plus I always have several sets of reserve stock in my garage, but then I put a lot more miles on my Wing than I do my SUV, especially since that to me is the preferred mode of traveling.

Underlying all of this is the fact that I know I have only two tires on my motorycle and their health and well being is far more important (relatively speaking) than my SUV, plus I put them through far more punishing and seemingly aggressive riding than my SUV.

Is it all that difficult to deal with? Hey, I love riding my Wing and I have way too much fun doing it, every time I ride it. It's a labor of love.

DaleC
 

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Maybe Im way off track here but in the case on my wing when the rear tire went south it still kept its bead. When MY front blew it did not, mostly because of the badly damaged rim Im sure. When I owned bikes with skinnier tubed tires and you had a flat slow or fast they generally never held the bead. Partly because of the tube design and partly I would assume because they did not have nearly as stiff a side wall. The rears going south on my wing were no big deal, the front with a bent rim was. The soft side wall tubed tires were a completely diff story but the bikes I was riding were not as heavy back then.

I was following a friend on his RK P-special a few years ago when his rear blew out going about 60 mph in heavy traffic. The tire bead broke loose and the rear end of his bike went violent from side to side flopping all over that soft side wall tire. I thought he was going to drop it right down to when he finally got it stopped. He has a good 400,000 miles under his belt on HD so he had some experiance that I believe saved his hide.

I have no idea how much shorter the wheel base on a RK is from a GW but from what I seen a longer wheel base would not have done much in his case. Stiffer side wall tubeless tires would have...imo.
 

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KA7W said:
Punkinwing

Yes, they were car brake pads, they were made by EBC and sold for Goldwings. They are NOT listed in the Happy Honda Manual.. They were sized to fit several bikes and cars. Actually work good and are pretty cheap compared to Honda. But I am back to using the expensive Honda pads.
Yes, "sized" to fit a goldwing.. You could even say they were "designed" for a goldwing application couldn't you?? EBC pads are some of the best out there for many motorcycle street and racing applications and to be honest, I've never seen them labeled for autos but I'll take your word for it...
The Avon tires are also not mentioned in the "Happy Honda Manual" how did they work out for you??? The logic presented in all these threads is so faulty, it's not even worth responding to anymore.. Enjoy life

Merry Christmas friends, Happy Holidays!!!
 

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pumkin,
Logic? what do you mean?
 

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Punkinwing,

The Avon tires are also not mentioned in the "Happy Honda Manual" how did they work out for you??? The logic presented in all these threads is so faulty, it's not even worth responding to anymore.. Enjoy life
Nope, the Avon is not listed in my Happy Honda Manual, Only the Bridgestone and Metzler is listed in there. And the Metzler was not even available back then.

I am actually trying out the New and Improved Avon as we speak. The first Avon exploded on me. This one is just wearing out fast and howls loudly in the corners.

The Bridgestone gave me the most traction, Actually it is a very good tire but the life span generally will not make a trip for me. The Bridgestone 709 is not listed in my Happy Honda Manual but it is by far the best front tire for the Wing. The second best front tire is the Avon VenomR but it is pretty noisy when wore.

Went up to Alaska with some guys. Punched a hole in my Car tire. Ended up having to buy a set of tires in Calgary, BC .... A set of E3's , my cost was 735 dollars Canadian.... and those tires are no longer on my bike because they wore out on the rest of the trip North. See a picture of those tires on bike at www.toemoss.com at the bottom of the page.

Metzlers are listed as a tire of choice in the Happy Honda Manual. I bought a set of those in Las Cruces, New Mexico. I could feel the thumping in the handle bars and when I would let loose, the front would wobble. Rode the bike on a rocky/dirt road north of Durango, Co and split the rear tire. And it blew out with less than 3000 miles on it. The front was replaced at 5000 miles because of excessive wobble.

The new tire of choice by the Happy Honda Company is the D250. It is a good tire, will last to 10k or so... But you gotta be ready for it to slid on a wet corner, over painted lines and tar snakes it will eat your lunch. Never goose it in a turn with D250's on it.

My preference of tires on a GL-1800 is a Bridgestone 709 on the front and a good 195/55R15 Run Flat on the rear preferably a winter version as it will do very well on ice and snow. Neither one of those tires are on listed in my Happy Honda Manual .... But the bike belongs to me and I will make the choices of rubber for it. 20,000 plus miles with those two tires and they will still be safe.

If I were to go race you guys on the twisties and ride the twisties every day, I would have a set of Bridgestones on the bike. Best traction, shortest life !!!! But even with the slippery D250's you can drag pegs and not worry about traction, same with a car tire. Just not enough lean angle and I do move body into the turn and touch knees on the ground. But since I use the bike to go visit grandkids, go see friends, and take fun trips all over the country and also to ride the dirt/gravel back roads, I will have a car tire on the back. Works very good for me;.

DO NOT INSTALL A CAR TIRE ON YOUR BIKE. ONLY USE GENUINE HONDA PARTS. DO NOT USE GERBINGS AS THEY ARE NOT IN MANUAL. ONLY USE GENUINE HONDA HP4 IN THE CRANKCASE AND CHANGE AT 8K INTERVALS. DO NOT USE A SIERRA CB ANTENNA AS IT IS NOT LISTED IN THE HAPPY HONDA MANUAL. DO NOT USE NON STANDARD HONDA CHROME PARTS.


JMHO 8)
 

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Joseph said:
Yup, front and rear. Most recent was the front immediatley after hitting a chunk of conrete while traveling 85mph. went from a fully inflated tire to flat with a bent rim in the matter of a second.
I hope people with this type of problem didn't vote "YES" in the survey, but I am sure most did.

What we were trying to get at, was how many people had a tire fail ALL BY ITSELF.... :wink:

Road debris, potholes, ledges and joints are NOT the fault of the tire...
:)
 

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Blow outs, never

I ride almost eveyday now since I moved to Florida to do so and almost every single time I ride I go over 100mph at all temperatures, I do a few burn outs and I run 131mph once in a while (GPS) I have never had a blow out, lots of flats though. I have ran every tire they offer, would only run Stones now, they are the only ones out there that are any good on slick rain soaked roads at high speeds. Ron
 
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