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Discussion Starter #1
Probably a question for Fred H., but has anyone attempted to just add fluid to the pre load adjuster through the bango bolt hole. It seems to me that you could add suspension fluid, if it is low, rather than go through the entire bleeding procedure. I could be wrong, and it wouldn't be the first time. :(
 

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Jim MC8 said:
Probably a question for Fred H., but has anyone attempted to just add fluid to the pre load adjuster through the bango bolt hole. It seems to me that you could add suspension fluid, if it is low, rather than go through the entire bleeding procedure. I could be wrong, and it wouldn't be the first time. :(
The question is... exactly what kind of fluid to add that will be compatible with the fluid already in there?... nobody seems to know for sure.

Therefore, many believe that it's better to drain everything out and put in the fluid of your choice.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
It's my understanding that it's Honda SS-7, 5 wt. suspension oil. I know that's been used for replacement.

I guess my point in this question is trying to make it easier for the less mechanically inclined to improve the performance of their pre load adjuster without having to dismantle it, or the bike. If you had the skills to get behind the right saddle bag, remove the actuator, and work with it while the shock was still on the bike that would be a plus in my book. Again, I'm not sure that this is possible, hence the original question.
 

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Jim MC8 said:
It's my understanding that it's Honda SS-7, 5 wt. suspension oil. I know that's been used for replacement.

I guess my point in this question is trying to make it easier for the less mechanically inclined to improve the performance of their pre load adjuster without having to dismantle it, or the bike. If you had the skills to get behind the right saddle bag, remove the actuator, and work with it while the shock was still on the bike that would be a plus in my book. Again, I'm not sure that this is possible, hence the original question.
The answer to the original question is "NO."
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Thanks Stu, you were the other person I thought might reply to this. It just seemed to me that this could be a possibility, but maybe that's what I get for thinking. :D
 

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The answer is "No" because there would be no room in either side of the coupling of that fitting to receive the oil. Fred's video shows how the extra room is created in the pump body to receive teh "extra" fluid. If you open that banjo fitting, you will likely allow air to enter the system and then you will have to figure out a way to bleed the air out.

prs
 

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It can be done without removing the shock. The adjuster needs to be run to the 0 position. The pump is removed from the bike and the hose carefully seperated from it and taped in a position with the end up. Don't let oil drain from it. Then top off the reservour and put the hose back on. Make sure you align the hose back in the same oriention as it was before. Reinstall and try it out. Should start laboring at 1 when done right. Also the seat needs to be removed and the right saddlebag loosened at the upper forward mount. I did mine and it works real good now. I used Honda shock oil that is for rear shocks. Don't have the number as the guy that helped me has it at his garage. We did 3 bikes the day Mine was done and still had plenty of oil left over.

Litnlennie (AKA) Leonard
Yup- I done it this way- but, I used some 10W fork oil that I had and used a cartridge ink injector to squirt it in with...
 
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