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In about 1973 the older brother of a friend of mine came home for a visit. My friend and I were about 17. The older brother, maybe 19-20 years old, had moved to Detroit and gotten a job in an assembly plant making cars. I think he worked in a plant building Dodge Darts and making what seemed to us teenagers working at Burger King to be a lot of money. He was telling us about his job and I recall he was tasked with fastening 5 or 6 bolts on the part of the car that mounted the radiator and the hood latch. It runs across the car from fender to fender behind the grille and headlights. His bolts were on one side of the car behind the headight on that side. So anyway he explained that at first he could only get to 3 or 4 of the bolts as "the line moved to fast for me." After a few weeks he was experienced and fast enough to get to all of the bolts. I remember thinking how many Dodge Darts had 3 bolts in a part that was designed for 6. He laughed about it.

Fast forward 13 years or so and I'm working at a Honda car dealer prepping cars from the transporter truck into inventory. Hondas are hard to get at the time, demand was high and outstripped supply. As soon as ships sailed from Japan or trucks left the Marysville, OH plant we got a list of what was coming by model and color and we were selling cars still on the ship or truck and buyers were waiting sometimes weeks to get their new Civic or Accord. So this day I was doing the PDI (pre delivery inspection) on a white '87 4 door Accord. The new owner was coming soon to take delivery. I literally never had an issue with the PDI list. Honda's factory Quality Control associates had the power to stop the assembly line when necessary and cars were carefully inspected prior to transport. The cars I saw were perfect until this day. The model came with a cranberry colored cloth interior but this Accord had a blue center cushion in the rear seat back. The side bolsters were cranberry but the middle part was blue. What an unbelieveable commotion ensued. Phone calls were made and everyone at the dealership came to look at it. Photos inside and out. American Honda did not want to deliver the car like that but the owner wanted to take it and just come back when we had a cranberry cushion for him. I don't recall but I guess we didn't have another white 4 door to swap the cushion with. Honda mothership did everything but fly the CEO from Japan to apologize to the buyer. That's was the difference between Honda and domestic cars in the 80s.
 

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Discussion Starter · #22 ·
Front/rear disc brake squeaks can usually be fixed by applying a bit of hi-temp brake lubricant to the back of the pads. I live by a simple rule: “never pay someone to do something I can do myself.” I get really pissed when I’m forced to pay a “professional,” and then I have to redo the work the “professional” did.
Yes ... I know ... I used to be a dealer tech, and managed Firestones, Goodyears, and whatever else there is out there, so as far as me doing it, I could. However, long ago I learned that sometimes I can make far more money doing what I do, which leaves plenty left over to pay someone else to do the stuff I don't care to do. The legistics of getting the rotors resurfaced is another issue ... I'd much rather have a real mechanic oversee that task instead of some parts stocker at AutoZone who was hired just last week.
 
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Discussion Starter · #23 ·
In about 1973 the older brother of a friend of mine came home for a visit. My friend and I were about 17. The older brother, maybe 19-20 years old, had moved to Detroit and gotten a job in an assembly plant making cars. I think he worked in a plant building Dodge Darts and making what seemed to us teenagers working at Burger King to be a lot of money. He was telling us about his job and I recall he was tasked with fastening 5 or 6 bolts on the part of the car that mounted the radiator and the hood latch. It runs across the car from fender to fender behind the grille and headlights. His bolts were on one side of the car behind the headight on that side. So anyway he explained that at first he could only get to 3 or 4 of the bolts as "the line moved to fast for me." After a few weeks he was experienced and fast enough to get to all of the bolts. I remember thinking how many Dodge Darts had 3 bolts in a part that was designed for 6. He laughed about it.

Fast forward 13 years or so and I'm working at a Honda car dealer prepping cars from the transporter truck into inventory. Hondas are hard to get at the time, demand was high and outstripped supply. As soon as ships sailed from Japan or trucks left the Marysville, OH plant we got a list of what was coming by model and color and we were selling cars still on the ship or truck and buyers were waiting sometimes weeks to get their new Civic or Accord. So this day I was doing the PDI (pre delivery inspection) on a white '87 4 door Accord. The new owner was coming soon to take delivery. I literally never had an issue with the PDI list. Honda's factory Quality Control associates had the power to stop the assembly line when necessary and cars were carefully inspected prior to transport. The cars I saw were perfect until this day. The model came with a cranberry colored cloth interior but this Accord had a blue center cushion in the rear seat back. The side bolsters were cranberry but the middle part was blue. What an unbelieveable commotion ensued. Phone calls were made and everyone at the dealership came to look at it. Photos inside and out. American Honda did not want to deliver the car like that but the owner wanted to take it and just come back when we had a cranberry cushion for him. I don't recall but I guess we didn't have another white 4 door to swap the cushion with. Honda mothership did everything but fly the CEO from Japan to apologize to the buyer. That's was the difference between Honda and domestic cars in the 80s.
That's a great story ... and here's another. I remember when a customer drives off in her brand new Plymouth Valient, only to return the next day regaurding her Dodge Dart. You see ... on the left side it was all Valient ... emblems, door trim, etc, but not the right. The right side says it was a Dodge Dart ... prior to delivery, no one noticed that the door panels from side to side was different.

I also remember when Honda started making cars in USA. Some from Japan, and some from the USA, and prior Honda car owners wanted nothing to do with the American made ones. They'd wait and pay far more for the same one coming from Japan.

As for 5th gen GL1800s ... I to would say that the ones from Japan are better, and in several ways. For example, I've yet to see a 2012-17 that had steering head wobble right out of the crate. Usually the saddle bags doors shut better, and don't have the message saying that ones not closed.

The part between the fenders that supports the radiator and hood latch is usually called the core support ... as in supporting the radiator core.
 

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No, sorry I don't. Should it have meaning ... maybe you can remember why I'd wrote it, and what it was all about ??? A link might help, but I'll probably not click on it, after all, it was 10 years ago, and for all I know, I was answering a question from 5 years before that.

We used to have another member who would troll old threads, it seemed like he would catalog them, and then years later he would bring up old threads, as if trying to throw them in someones face. I get the feeling that you're trying to do the same ... are you ???
Wow all I was doing was asking you a question. (I read that in a old Fram oil filter thread.)
I only asked becaue you always tell others to only use OEM parts, and I'm sorry, but it struck me as funny, and nothing more!.
I had no idea you'd go off the deep end for nothing.

Sorry I asked.
 

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Discussion Starter · #25 · (Edited)
Wow all I was doing was asking you a question. (I read that in a old Fram oil filter thread.)
I only asked becaue you always tell others to only use OEM parts, and I'm sorry, but it struck me as funny, and nothing more!.
I had no idea you'd go off the deep end for nothing.

Sorry I asked.
I'd be sorry too ... your question was out of place, it seems like you're fishing for some reaction, obviouly you don't like the answers I give, and I'm tired of you doing similar stuff. If you don't like what I write, move on and go hang out on someone elses forum.

You're not welcome here ... go fine another sand-box to play in !!!
 

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Discussion Starter · #27 ·
Who died and made you boss on Anyone?

You don't own this forum. Verticle scope does.

You LIED and got caught. That is all there is too it.
I am totally confused. Please share what I lied about ???
 

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ugh This brings back memories of my 1974 Plymouth Duster. What a POS

I had one of those too. Worst quality car I've ever owned in my 75+ years.. Used to carry a spare ballast resister in the glove compartment - and even showed my wife how to change it when it would fail and leave her stranded in a parking lot somewhere.. Awful brakes.. Rust.. We were pinching pennies back then so were stuck with it for some years. Was so happy to finally rid myself of it.
 
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Discussion Starter · #29 · (Edited)
I had one of those too. Worst quality car I've ever owned in my 75+ years.. Used to carry a spare ballast resister in the glove compartment - and even showed my wife how to change it when it would fail and leave her stranded in a parking lot somewhere.. Awful brakes.. Rust.. We were pinching pennies back then so were stuck with it for soon years. Was so happy to finally rid myself of it.
Did you have a slant-6, or a 318 ??? I had a 64 Dart with a slant-6, 3-speed torqueflite, pushbutton automatic. I really liked.

Back then, and working at a Chrysler/Ply dealer as a mechanic, most everything was overhauled ... for the work I was responsible for that included starters, alternators, carbs, distributors, and wiper motors. For others in the shop, brake calipers, power steering pumps, steering columns and boxes, engines, and transmissions. In 1978, the owner dropped Chrysler/Ply, and he bought the Ford dealer up the street, and being a mechanic, at least for me, was no longer fun. Most stuff we used to OH, was done at an authorized remanufactureing plant, and mechanics like me became a parts hanger. Of coarse it still took someone to diagnose a problem, but everyones favorite part of the job is known as "bench work," or the actual repair of a part, was no longer part of the job. Every mechanic I've ever known likes bench work.

One of the things I like most about doing transmission repair on 5th gens, is that the repair itself is very much like the old days. As a mechanic, I'm responsible for the diagnosis, the teardown, cleaning, the inspection, reassembly, and installation. Like the old days, machinests are involved. In my case, various parts are sent to 3 different machine shop ... one for the tranny, one for the case halves, and the output shaft gets sent to another.
 
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Did you have a slant-6, or a 318 ??? I had a 64 Dart with a slant-6, 3-speed torqueflite, pushbutton automatic. I really liked.

Back then, and working at a Chrysler/Ply dealer as a mechanic, most everything was overhauled ... for the work I was responsible for that included starters, alternators, carbs, distributors, and wiper motors. For others in the shop, brake calipers, power steering pumps, steering columns and boxes, engines, and transmissions. In 1978, the owner dropped Chrysler/Ply, and he bought the Ford dealer up the street, and being a mechanic, at least for me, was no longer fun. Most stuff we used to OH, was done at an authorized remanufactureing plant, and mechanics like me became a parts hanger. Of coarse it still took someone to diagnose a problem, but everyone favorite part of the job known as "bench work," or the actual repair of a part, was no longer part of the job. Every mechanic I've ever known likes bench work.

One of the things I like most about doing transmission repair on 5th gens, is that the repair itself is very much like the old days. As a mechanic, I'm responsible for the diagnosis, the teardown, cleaning, the inspection, reassembly, and installation. Like the old days, machinests are involved. In my case, various parts are sent to 3 different machine shop ... one for the tranny, one for the case halves, and the output shaft gets sent to another.

It was a slant six. I also owned a '66 Valiant with the slant six that was a pretty good car. But one not so fond memory I have of that car was the time I finished an ignition tune up and didn't get the push-on rotor piece that spins inside the cap back on straight. Tried to start and no fire-up. Pulled the cap and discovered the rotor had jammed in the top of the cap - and now the rotor shaft would spin freely by hand! DAMN!! I though I had created a serious internal engine problem. Pulled the distributor and the shaft drive gear was mostly gone. Fortunately, it was made of plastic. Miraculously, was able to find and buy a new one at a local parts store. I had a Chilton manual and was able to reinstall properly timed following the directions. But I'll never forget the "hollow feeling" I had in the pit of my stomach when I grabbed that rotor shaft and it spun freely in my fingers!
 

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Discussion Starter · #31 ·
It was a slant six. I also owned a '66 Valiant with the slant six that was a pretty good car. But one not so fond memory I have of that car was the time I finished an ignition tune up and didn't get the push-on rotor piece that spins inside the cap back on straight. Tried to start and no fire-up. Pulled the cap and discovered the rotor had jammed in the top of the cap - and now the rotor shaft would spin freely by hand! DAMN!! I though I had created a serious internal engine problem. Pulled the distributor and the shaft drive gear was mostly gone. Fortunately, it was made of plastic. Miraculously, was able to find and buy a new one at a local parts store. I had a Chilton manual and was able to reinstall properly timed following the directions. But I'll never forget the "hollow feeling" I had in the pit of my stomach when I grabbed that rotor shaft and it spun freely in my fingers!
WOW ... I'd completely forgot about the distributor's nylon drive gear on slant-6s, and having to line-up, and then drill thru the gear, install it's, if I recall, a dowel pin, so that it could then be correctly timed.

We got to set the dwell, and verify that the advances worked correctly on a Sun Distrubutor machine. A distributor machine would also show how well the points would open and close in relation to all 6 or 8 cam lobes. On the Datsun's, they had dual points. If I recall, the primary set fired the coil in N, 1st, and 2nd, and secondary points fired the coil once it was shifted into 3rd and 4th gear. The secondary pointed retarded the timing 3 degs. Once installed and running, we could see all on a Sun Scope too. Sun made high-tech equipment back then.
Automotive lighting Vehicle Automotive tire Motor vehicle Bumper
Tire Motor vehicle Wheel Vehicle Gas
 

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I had the ‘74 Dodge Dart with the 318 V8. It was the first car I ever bought brand new. It was also the worst car I ever bought new or used. It really was a POS. It didn’t like going out in the rain or damp weather and liked to hang out in the middle of intersections. I tried everything I could to get that motor to keep from stalling, including a manual choke and frequent spraying of the distributor cap and ignition wires with silicon. However, I did get to know the guys at the auto parts store really well.
 
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Discussion Starter · #34 ·
Really like hearing (remembering) about some of those "vintage" 🤔 cars
I'm enjoying it too, and have not even seen, or used, the word "dwell" in decades.
 
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My first car was a 1968 MGC. I drove it 8 years and I think over 100,000 miles but I'm not sure - the speedometer & odometer quit working at regular intervals. It was a great car for my mechanic father to teach me basic vehicle repair because almost everything needed repair if not once, several times, sometimes a field repair. I will say it only left me stranded on the side of the road once but I always carried a toolbox, hammer, electrical wire, and bits of hose.
 

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Discussion Starter · #37 ·
I'm enjoying it too, and have not even seen, or used, the word "dwell" in decades.
While writing the word "dwell" I was trying to remember what it meant and vagley remember it representing the amout of time a set of points are open to fire the coil. Of coase dwell can be set by measuring the gap and angle also.

Until electronic ignition came out, I never knew that voltage to the primary side of the ignition system in the run position was 7volts, but is battery voltage while in the start position. The ingnition switch is what switches it from start/crancking (12v) to run (7volts). For Chrysler thus the need for the dual ballast. The ballast is what reduces the voltage. Ford used a long resistor wire to reduce voltage. I'm not sure how GM did it.
 

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My first car was a used 1970 Plymouth Sport Satellite. 318 CID. It was acquired through my Dad’s partnership through an abandoned title process from a building renter who skipped town with rent due. At 30,000 miles and a few years old, 1975 I think, it had a burnt exhaust valve and reverse didn’t work in the auto tranny. The tranny problem was just a clogged filter. I fixed both issues before I had my learners permit to drive. I had a paper route at the time to finance the thing.

It served its purpose but was a pain to keep running good. I sold it off when I was driving to and from college. I couldn’t afford the gas when I was in school.

It was replaced with a used 1977 Toyota SR5 truck to get me through school and the first few years of work. The truck was very reliable but wasn’t as comfortable.

When I sold that car off I vowed to never own another Chrysler product.

Car Tire Wheel Vehicle Land vehicle
 

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While writing the word "dwell" I was trying to remember what it meant and vagley remember it representing the amout of time a set of points are open to fire the coil. Of coase dwell can be set by measuring the gap and angle also.
...
Dwell is the time (angle in degrees) the points are closed, with the thought to allow maximum coil saturation.
 

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Dwell is the time (angle in degrees) the points are closed, with the thought to allow maximum coil saturation.
Yup. You’re correct. Had to think about it cuz it was so long ago. I actually sort of enjoyed fussing with the old fashioned ignition tune ups “back in the day” but I don’t touch them anymore.
 
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