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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I've done my own changes on my '02 every two years since purchase (never get to 12k in two years). For me the final step has been blowing coolant up the overflow hose from the reservoir to the radiator neck - supposedly to get all air out of the hose so that proper flow up and down the hose is possible without any air interference.

I'm wondering how necessary that is and if you DYI people do that?
 

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I do it just because I like to purge all the air out of the system, but it isn't a critical step. If you don't do it, the bike should self purge the overflow line after a few heat cool cycles.

You should also be aware that if you do purge the air from the line, and then later open the radiator cap, all the fluid in the line will flow back into the reservoir, and your line will now have air in it again. One way you can prevent this from happening is to pinch the hose before opening the cap and keeping it pinched until you put the cap back on. But this is probably all overkill and not really necessary.
 

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I've done my own changes on my '02 every two years since purchase (never get to 12k in two years). For me the final step has been blowing coolant up the overflow hose from the reservoir to the radiator neck - supposedly to get all air out of the hose so that proper flow up and down the hose is possible without any air interference.

I'm wondering how necessary that is and if you DYI people do that?
Even for a DIY'r, Honda write a nearly perfect set of instructions on how to refill the cooling system, burp it, and get air out of the reservior hoses, all at the same time. I'm not sure I understand why anyone would want to pressurize the reservior system. Instead, follow the instructions Honda's prints in their Service Manual ... easy-peasy !!! To me it sounds like you'll have an antifreeze mess to clean up.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Even for a DIY'r, Honda write a nearly perfect set of instructions on how to refill the cooling system, burp it, and get air out of the reservior hoses, all at the same time. I'm not sure I understand why anyone would want to pressurize the reservior system. Instead, follow the instructions Honda's prints in their Service Manual ... easy-peasy !!! To me it sounds like you'll have an antifreeze mess to clean up.

I was following the advise of one highly respected member of this forum.. Careful placement of copious paper towels precludes the mess.
 

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No need to pre-fill the overflow hose that connects the cooling system filler neck (where the radiator cap is) to the overflow/surge tank. First, doing so is pointless because the first time the radiator cap is loosened or removed, or before you can install the radiator cap, the contests of this hose will drain to the overflow tank. (Gravity will work its magic.) Second, this hose will be automatically be purged during the normal operation of a properly operating cooling system.
 

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I was following the advise of one highly respected member of this forum.. Careful placement of copious paper towels precludes the mess.
Do you have a Service Manual ???

As for the advise, I'm speechless ... I can't imagine why someone would advise you to do that. Maybe they think those hoses get plugged, or don't understand how a recovery system and the cooling system work in relation to one-another. It's simple physics of expansion and contraction. In either case, following the instruction in the Service Manual is far easier.
 

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I've done my own changes on my '02 every two years since purchase (never get to 12k in two years). For me the final step has been blowing coolant up the overflow hose from the reservoir to the radiator neck - supposedly to get all air out of the hose so that proper flow up and down the hose is possible without any air interference.

I'm wondering how necessary that is and if you DYI people do that?
Being a genuine DYI person who changes the coolant in my Goldwing on a regular schedule I do not do that. I do evacuate all the coolant I possibly can from the reservoir with a hand operated vacuum pump. I'm wondering what could possibly cause interference of the coolant from flowing up and down the hose, particularly on a bike that has been regularly serviced. I doubt a dirty air filter has anything to do with, but it is an alleged culprit for other issues ;).
 

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Larry,
I change out my Radiator fluid every season , as well as an oil/filter change, replace spark plugs (spray in fogging fluid )into each open spark plug hole before replacing, and of course fuel stabilizer is put into a full tank of fuel , and battery maintainer plugged in, before I put her away every season............ I have never had to blow any coolant up the overflow.... I always add the coolant
(50/50 mixture) INTO THE RADIATOR very, very slowly, start it up and allow it to transfer this fluid it self.... BUT you got to do it very slow because it will come back at you if you don't, and make a mess..It will seem like a long time before it's 100% filled,

Ronnie
 

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1) if you are concerned about the "old" coolant in the overflow tank....I use a small shop vac ( "Stinger") with a small dia. hose ( 3/8 or 10mm clear plastic) duct taped to the suction hose of the vac and suck out the old coolant.
2) I fill the overflow tank with some distilled water and suck it out a 2nd time ....just to make sure it's empty/clean
3) when i get ready to fill the radiator, I remove the twist grip side ( right side) lower engine cover...on my 2012 it has foam rubber attached to the inside of it ( the cover) ...If i spill any coolant it MAY get soaked up by the foam rubber on that cover and stink for a long time...causing you to search for a leaky hose connection (that does not exist)
4) As you fill the cooling system (SLOWLY- maybe a 1/2 gal in) start the engine and continue to fill the system (again, slowly) ...when the thermostat opens it may "burb" back some coolant and overflow into that small area by the filler neck. ( now you've done it!)
5) Once the system is filled and you put a new cap on ( for my 2012, It's a 16 lb cap, Stant P/N 10233, or a Murray 7516 fits the bill ( about $10 from O'reilly's auto parts) ....you need to "wash down" the area around the filler neck ( due to the burping action/spill) take your time don't use fire hose pressure, but a small stream and make sure you clean off the area just below the filler neck (looks like a aluminum piece of sheet metal... it's the top of the right hand side radiator) I also rinse of the top fins of the right side radiator by hosing them off from the "outside" of the fairing.
6) Once the bike has cooled off due to the burping exercise, fill the overflow tank to the correct (full) level
7) leaving the right side engine cover off, I take the bike for a 20-30 minute ride ( depending on air temp, hotter it is the shorter the ride) by riding it with the cover off you won't trap any excess/washed off coolant in the foam rubber on the cover.
8) let the bike cool off, check the coolant level in the overflow tank (add if necessary) and put back the engine cover.
hth
 

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yep I read it Larry :unsure: LOL

Ronnie
 

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First I follow the service manual procedure for the last 30 years. My previous 1978 GL I completely forgot about coolant changes and my waterpump broke at 200,000km at 10 years. Fortunately that is the only thing that has broken on the bike and its now 43.

Ok so I follow the manuals procedure but have always wondered why you need to burp? If there is air in the system, but the system heats up and cools down, moving coolant from reserve to radiator and back, doesnt whatever air just get vented out the reserve?
 

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Ok so I follow the manuals procedure but have always wondered why you need to burp? If there is air in the system, but the system heats up and cools down, moving coolant from reserve to radiator and back, doesnt whatever air just get vented out the reserve?
You burp the system so that the coolant system is full of fluid and not air. Fluid doesn't compress hardly at all, while air will compress. The relief cap works on pressure and if you have air in the system it may not allow the cap to release when it should. Air can also mix with some coolant types and cause them to gel. Air in the coolant also reduces the coolant capacity and thus affects the overall efficiency of the system. And no, air may not self purge from the radiator if it isn't properly purged.

The purpose of purging the air out of the return hose to the reservoir is so that when the coolant cools down and draws coolant back into the tank from the reservoir, it isn't drawing air instead of fluid. While it isn't required, it will help minimize the amount of air pocket on top of the radiator. If you ever open the radiator cap and notice that the level is about a cup low everytime even though you filled it to the top the last time, this is why. That missing cup of fluid is due to the trapped air in the return line that gets drawn back up to the radiator. Like I said, you don't have to do it, but I like to just to minimize the amount of air gap. It's not a huge deal, it's just something I like to do to help the system, and in light of the overheating issues on the early model bikes, I feel like the cooling system needs all the help it can get.
 

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Thanks Fred, as a DY'r I like to read important info like this, cause I do change out my anti freeze fluid every end of the season, along with you guessed it, my oil & filter as well....I also squirt in Fogging oil into each cylinder head, fuel stabilizer in full tank of fuel, and battery Maintainer plugged on to the battery.............all three wheels off cement floor (trike) and washed and wax'd and covered over with a nice warm blanket......

Ronnie
11/20/21
 

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Here's the big elephant that's missing throughout this thread. Prior to doing a coolant change, the system needs properly inspected. To do that requires a cooling system pressure tester, and the adapters to pressure test the system and the cap. The reservior needs removed, cleaned, and inspected. The tube-level and reservior hoses need inspected, and replaced if cracking is seen around their ends. Adding new coolant, with a fresh additive pack designed to chemically keep the system clean, can clean out small leaks making them worst. Not only can they leak coolant, but they can also allow air to enter. Until a proper inspection is done, all coolant issues resolved, the system properly burped, unexpected results can occure. Examples are:
  • air under the radiator cap
  • coolant smells
  • a rising temp gauge
  • coolant leaks
  • high/low and inconsistant levels in the reservior
  • coolant being pushed out the over-fill hose
  • fan or fans not working properly
  • being in a GW group ride, and complaints of coolant gauge reading on some Wings, while others don't have that issue
Keep this in mind ... with over 44+ hose clamps on a 5th gen Wing, the probablility of a Wing failing a pressure test is extreemly high, and is probably why Honda says in the Owner's Manual to have it professionally checked out. However, if a DIYr is able to pressure test the system and the cap, and follows a couple of additional steps, most can do the work themselves. These are the add'l step:
  • inspect the reservior hoses and tube level hose as described above
  • forget the 6sec pressure test as Honda recommends. Here at JustWings, we do 2 cooling system pressure tests. Both are done for at least 4 hours. After any repairs are done, the tests are redone. The first test is a high-pressure test. We pressure test at 16-18psi. The second one is a low-pressure test. That one is done at 6-8psi. The longer the testing of each the better. The reason for the 4 hours ... because a small leak might need to fill a pooling area, to spill over, to fill another pooling area, to finally find it's way to the ground.
 

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Never in the history of this site have I ever read Greg deviate from the Honda gospel aka the service manual !!!!!!!!!!!!!!! Maybe he is coming around to our way of thinking, but probably not.
 

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What a bunch of nonsense!

My 2002 overheated because of the ECM. The former owner could have replaced it for free under the recall, but thanks to advice like this on the Internet, I had to buy one and do it myself. After that, no problems.

There are antifreeze testers and I think you will find that if you actually test the old antifreeze it is still good. So draining every lost drop, from a real world perspective, makes absolutely no difference. Do you guys think Honda dealers waste time doing that? I don't think so!

Finally, if the overflow system is intact it will do the job itself. Personally, I think you should verify that it is leak free by letting it do the job, then topping off the overflow tank. If the level doesn't change check the hose for cracks.
 

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People treat these bikes better than they would ever consider treating their cars! Which oil to use , what filter is best, on and on. I personally have never had a vehicle, bike or car that had a oil related failure. I just don't think they are quite that sensitive. And I don't want one that is.
What a bunch of nonsense!

My 2002 overheated because of the ECM. The former owner could have replaced it for free under the recall, but thanks to advice like this on the Internet, I had to buy one and do it myself. After that, no problems.

There are antifreeze testers and I think you will find that if you actually test the old antifreeze it is still good. So draining every lost drop, from a real world perspective, makes absolutely no difference. Do you guys think Honda dealers waste time doing that? I don't think so!

Finally, if the overflow system is intact it will do the job itself. Personally, I think you should verify that it is leak free by letting it do the job, then topping off the overflow tank. If the level doesn't change check the hose for cracks.
 
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