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The service manual says to torque the lug nets to 80ft pounds. To me that seems a bit much.


So my question is; do you torque your lug nuts? If so, to what value?
 

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The service manual says to torque the lug nets to 80ft pounds. To me that seems a bit much.


So my question is; do you torque your lug nuts? If so, to what value?
Torque them to the torque listed in the Service Manual. My manual also says 80ft/lbs.

FYI ... in the automotive repair world, 80ft/lbs is a very common lug nut torque value, and our lug nuts and lug studs are the same size as the car world.
 

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The 80# spec is considering clean and dry lug/stud threads. NO lube and no anti-seize. If you just have to use anti-seize to be all warm and fuzzy you need to significantly reduce the applied torque. How much? 20% to 25% "might" be a fair guess, but best practice is to leave the threads clean and dry.

prs
 
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The service manual says to torque the lug nets to 80ft pounds. To me that seems a bit much.


So my question is; do you torque your lug nuts? If so, to what value?
It just sounded like a lot to me.
What are you basing your opinion on?
 

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The amount of effort to set it and then get them lose when I change tires.


I've been setting it a 80 and was just wondering. Not trying to re-invent anything.
I get it for sure. Getting them to loosen with a 24" breaker bar while laying on back or kneeling is a PIA. I use a 36" breaker and sit while the bike is on its right side.

prs
 
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I get it for sure. Getting them to loosen with a 24" breaker bar while laying on back or kneeling is a PIA. I use a 36" breaker and sit while the bike is on its right side.

prs
I always use air impact wrench to loosen them; easy-pesy. Torque wrench to tighten. Always 80 ft pounds.
 
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Having to remove the rear wheel with just a 60-90 piece tool kit kept on the bike can be a bit hard to do on the road, but I have done it a few times. I end up putting whatever I can on the end of the wrench that I can to add leverage, sometimes a crescent wrench taped to the end of the handle of the ratchet, and steady force while I feel for slip potential. That has also taken a great deal of patience to get all 5 loose. Putting them back on ends up being short of 80 ft.lb., but as soon as I get back home, it gets torqued to spec. If I am home, I either use my big torque wrench or put a pipe over the ratchet handle to remove. 2001-2017's also go with 80.
 

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Having to remove the rear wheel with just a 60-90 piece tool kit kept on the bike can be a bit hard to do on the road, but I have done it a few times. I end up putting whatever I can on the end of the wrench that I can to add leverage, sometimes a crescent wrench taped to the end of the handle of the ratchet, and steady force while I feel for slip potential. That has also taken a great deal of patience to get all 5 loose. Putting them back on ends up being short of 80 ft.lb., but as soon as I get back home, it gets torqued to spec. If I am home, I either use my big torque wrench or put a pipe over the ratchet handle to remove. 2001-2017's also go with 80.
I carry one of these.

Lays nicely in my left saddlebag.
 

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I pull the rear wheel off on the center stand by myself with a 17" Craftsman breaker bar. I haven't found the handbrake on the DCT strong enough to hold the wheel so I slide a 1" broomstick through the spokes which locks against the brake caliper and the lug nuts come right off. To reinstall, I use the same broomstick which locks against the parking brake caliper and then I torque to 80 lbs. Pretty easy on the center stand.

Marc
 

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Why would anyone not want to go with the manual on torque values?
 

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80 ft-lb is indeed the correct torque value. Previous Gen GW's also had this same value. In the ways that matter, the rear wheel of the GW is very similar to a car tire. As other posters have indicated, car Q values are often even higher than this.

80 is the right number. Use 80. It might be harder to un-Q the lug nuts but it is better than the alternative, which is the wheel falling off, which HAS HAPPENED precisely b/c the Q values were too low.
 
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