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Discussion Starter #1
I have a 2012 wing, while crossing on of the nastiest roads in South Florida, In the rain, I had the rear brake, start to grab the disc. Scared the Crap out of me, thought I was going down. got it to the shop, and the techs, put it up on the centerstand, and spon the rear wheel to find it locked up a few times. they stated, It hasn't happened to a 12, that they knew of. anyone else every have this issue?
 

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I have a 2012 wing, while crossing on of the nastiest roads in South Florida, In the rain, I had the rear brake, start to grab the disc. Scared the Crap out of me, thought I was going down. got it to the shop, and the techs, put it up on the centerstand, and spon the rear wheel to find it locked up a few times. they stated, It hasn't happened to a 12, that they knew of. anyone else every have this issue?
Curious...What road did this happen on & what dealership inspected the rear brake :?:
 

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Discussion Starter #4
sold as a 12

but the bike date is 12-11
 

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IronMan
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:roll::roll: adding up the # 's and ya got some seat time in :thumbup::thumbup:
 

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Vendor
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Did the road have lots of bumps or expansion joints in it?

My first guess is that your left front caliper is binding on the pivot point, and when you hit a bump it is actuating the secondary master cylinder slightly due to the momentum in the forks and then not releasing properly.

I've often wondered about the wisdom of Honda's design of putting a secondary master cylinder on the left fork, tied to a large mass like the caliper, and how this is going to react on heavy and repeated bumps where the forks are moving up and down. I think this could also be partially to blame for the rough ride from the anti-dive valve on a road with expansion joints in it.
 

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Just got my 12 out of the shop last week from a rear brake not releasing fully. It was bad enough that when you let off the throttle, you could feel the bike slow. Since I had installed the Kury brake pedal, the tech put the full blame on it. Said it was too tight against the side. Although no marring or scuffing could be found, because it was after market no warranty. Ended up having the the fluid and brakes tested. The rear brake pistons were covered in a gooy substance which was causing the brake to drag. Just picked the bike up new in Aug of last year. Shouldn't be seeing this type of wear. The shop manager did run the serial numbers and found all the services were up to date and logged in the computer.
 

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There was a recall for this problem.Here is a link. http://www.honda.com/newsandviews/article.aspx?id=6426-en

You may want to remind the tech at the dealership. It was issued prior to the '12 model year and doesn't cover a '12 but that's not saying it can't happen to a '12.
The brake recall did apply to the 2012's as well. I had to have it done on my 2012. Mine passed though. I believe there have been instances of bikes that passed the recall still having a problem.
 

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Directly from Honda:


American Honda Motor Co., Inc. has notified the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) that a potential defect relating to motor vehicle safety exists in the secondary master cylinder on certain 2001-2010 and 2012 model year GL1800 motorcycles.

Situation:
The compensating port hole inside the secondary master cylinder (part of the combined-braking system) can become blocked due to (1) stacking of tolerances in manufacturing and (2) sufficient swelling of the primary pressure cup inside the master cylinder. If the compensating port hole becomes completely blocked, the rear wheel brake caliper can drag after the rider releases the brake input. If this occurs, the rear brake temperature and pressure progressively increase. Unexpected braking increases the risk of a crash and continued riding with the brake engaged can generate enough heat to cause the rear brake to catch fire.

Inspection and Repair:
Honda motorcycle dealers will inspect the secondary master cylinder of all affected motorcycles in dealership stock or sold to customers (consumers and commercial entities). If an inspection indicates that the compensator port hole can become blocked due to this problem, the dealer will replace the secondary master cylinder. Registered owners of affected motorcycles will be contacted by mail and asked to take their motorcycle to a Honda dealer. The dealer will inspect the motorcycle, and if necessary, replace the secondary master cylinder, free of charge.

Additional Details:
Honda motorcycle dealers will immediately receive a transmittal of complete repair instructions. Replacement secondary master cylinders in the U.S. will initially be made available through American Honda's dealer technical support hotline. Upon approval by NHTSA, American Honda will mail a letter to all registered owners, and also post a copy of the letter on the Honda Brand website: powersports.honda.com. Target dates for website posting are before the end of December 2011, and mail receipt by registered customers should occur before the end of January 2012.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
:roll::roll: adding up the # 's and ya got some seat time in :thumbup::thumbup:

right now about 438,251.3 miles on bikes


I was told it didn't fail, that there was air line the lines. I just had the 12K tune up done, not a week before.
 
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