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I have a set of J&M speakers that were purchased for my '98 Harley Ultra Classic and would like to install in the rear of my '03 Goldwind. The speakers are 6 ohm. The honda uses 4 ohm speakers (I think). Is there a way that I can adapt them?
 

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The Honda system will have a hard time pushing against a 6 ohm load and you will not get much volume compared to the fronts. There seems to be a built in volume bias towards the front speakers as it is so the short answer is no, they will not be suitable for the rears.
 

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The tough answer is that you can't say for certain that it won't work just because of the impedance. The higher impedance speaker no doubt has the deck stacked against it because the radio will put out less power, but if the speaker has significantly better efficiency than the stock 3 ohm Honda speakers, it could actually be louder. It is a common misconception that loudness is directly related to impedance.

Everyone gets too hung up on power output. I have a pair of 8 ohm Klipschorns in my home that have a 103 db rating at 1 watt. A pair of 4 ohm AR speakers with an 87 db rating would require 32 watts to equal the volume level of my Klipsch's at 1 watt.

Do an experiment. Get a couple of strong small cardboard boxes about the size of the rear pods. Cut a couple of holes and mount the speakers. Pull your seat and hook them up.

I don't know anything about the J&M speakers, but if they are good sounding high quality speakers and they fit, try it. The most you can lose is an afternoon of working on your baby if they don't sound good. You cannot harm the radio or the speakers in any way.

Larry
 

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Larry in my experience Ohms law is ohms law and you can only do so much with speaker efficiency.
Last time I checked out amplifier specs for example a thousand watt amp at 4 ohms was good for roughly 2000 watts at 2 ohms. Nah, ohms doesn't play much of a factor.
Your experience may vary.
your's in hygroscopic living.
 

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You just made my point for me. The only thing that those specs mean is that the power supply of that amp is capable of driving a 2 ohm load just as well as a 4 ohm load without sagging, since the power doubles when the impedance is cut in half, nothing more.

I can use your specs as an example. What if you have a 2 ohm speaker that is rated at 94 [email protected], and a 4 ohm speaker that is rated at 97 [email protected] The 4 ohm speaker will be louder at 1000 watts than the 2 ohm speaker will be at 2000 watts. Ohm's Law can't explain that one, because it doesn't deal with Sound Pressure Levels.

Remember these simple guidelines when trying to interpret efficiency ratings of speakers.
1. For every 3db increase in volume, you must double the power.
2. To double the volume, you must increase the power tenfold.

Like I said, don't get too hung up on power output and impedance. It only tells part of the story.
C.O.T., Sorry if this got off your original topic a little.
Larry
 

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Three quick points:
1) In Ohms law, Wattage (power) is heat, not loudness!!
2) Impeadence is not really resistance, you can't calculate these factors like you can with DC resistance.. We are talking about AC not DC.. AC with constantly varying frequency..
3) I DO remember seeing a fader adjustment on the wing, don't recall how I got to it though!! :?
 
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