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Discussion Starter #1
I know there were posts in the past on tie down points, but I can't seem to find them.

I have been using a soft tie around the frame above the fog light for a front point, (after removing the fog light cover) and haven't had any issues. However, I have been removing the cover on the rear crash bar and using that, and didn't have any issues until last week.

I hit a storm drain that was poorly placed after the road was resurfaced and bounced my trailer pretty hard. It actually bounced the bike hard enough that it bent one of the crash bars, and I will have to remove it to straighten or replace it.

What else have people used for a tie down point on the rear?
 

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Are you using a wheel chock and just have the tie down points to keep the bike steady or are you using the tie downs to hold the bike upright?

If just to keep the bike steady, I use 2 ratchet straps around the rear tire/wheel. I put one strap thru the spokes and take it back to the other end of the same strap. Essentially it makes a loop, so 2 loops puilling against each other. One on each side keeps the rear tire/wheel centered, even if I hit a bump.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Are you using a wheel chock and just have the tie down points to keep the bike steady or are you using the tie downs to hold the bike upright?

If just to keep the bike steady, I use 2 ratchet straps around the rear tire/wheel. I put one strap thru the spokes and take it back to the other end of the same strap. Essentially it makes a loop, so 2 loops puilling against each other. One on each side keeps the rear tire/wheel centered, even if I hit a bump.
I use a drive in wheel chock. But I still feel the bike needs to be held down better. Maybe I'm being over cautious, but I don't want it to come loose.
 

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You're not being overly cautious at all. I use a chock (actually it is a Rampage lift with a modified chock), Honda's "yoke" method AND Goldstrike tie down points, and the rear wheel straps as I described.

Since you are using a chock, IMO the 2 straps around the rear wheel is enough to hold the rear in place.
 

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The best way to tie any bike down is concentrate on the front. Put the bike on side stand and using a ratchet strap tie the left side snug with soft ties to the side and forward and side stand unmoveable pressing hard to the trailer. Try to use the top of the tree or even the handle bars. Then for the right side do the same. But on the right you will pull/ratchet the straps down and forward compressing the forks until the bike is verticle. The forks is what holds the bike solid. The rear tie is only needed to keep the rear from moving either left or right. So angle them down and to the side and maybe slightly rearward. I had a set of ties that slid over the left grip like a sock but pulled to the right and then other slid over the throttle pulling to the left. This tie was one piece connected like an X and had loops for the ratchet straps. Found them at the Dealer.
 

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I would never use the side stand as an anchor point on a motorcycle tie down. Great way to bend the frame. Had someone use it when transporting my 1982 Wing. Bent the frame. I was lucky, on the 1982 GL1100’s that happened to be a replaceable frame section, so I did.
 

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To hold the rear in place I simply tie a ratchet strap to 1 side of the trailer, go to the other side after wrapping the strap around the rear wheel/tire 1 time, then snug it down with the ratchet. Done!
 

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Try to use the top of the tree or even the handle bars.
His bike is a 2018+. There is no triple tree. Honda has 2 recommended ways of securing it; the "yoke" method and the engine crash guard method.
Using the handlebars is specifically NOT recommended. The reason is the possibility of damaging the heated grips.
 
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Here is what I did as soon as I got the bike;


Take both side panels off
Remove the seat
Put a soft tie around the frame under the passengers area (rear of the bike)
Put seat back on
Put side panels back on.


Now if I need a tow I take the side panels off and the soft ties are in place to secure a strap on the left and on the right.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Here is what I did as soon as I got the bike;


Take both side panels off
Remove the seat
Put a soft tie around the frame under the passengers area (rear of the bike)
Put seat back on
Put side panels back on.


Now if I need a tow I take the side panels off and the soft ties are in place to secure a strap on the left and on the right.
Do you have an issue with it rubbing on the saddle bag paint, or are you forward more than that?

I might look into this. It wouldn't take much to remove the seat before we leave on a trip where we are using the trailer, then take the soft tie off when we get back home.
 

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I use two straps looped around the frame to hold the bike upright and two straps around the tire to prevent the bike from sliding sideways, and two straps around the steering yoke. The straps can stay on the frame under the seat, just zip tie the ends together so they stay in place. I do stuff a microfibre cloth in a couple places where the ratchet strap gets close to plastic.
 

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Do you have an issue with it rubbing on the saddle bag paint, or are you forward more than that?

I might look into this. It wouldn't take much to remove the seat before we leave on a trip where we are using the trailer, then take the soft tie off when we get back home.

No issue, it is tucked underneath the side cover and you need to leave the side cover off in order to tie the bike down adequately.
 
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