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For those of you that change your own rear tires and do not have a torque wrench, are you concerned that you have the tire on tight enough and how do you know that?? Should I go buy a torque wrench??

As you can tell I am a first timer on changing my own tires. Thanks for the answers.

Jay
 

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Yes, buy a torque wrench. And get one with ft/lbs, not in/lbs. At least 3/8" but for the rear wheels, I prefer a 1/2". You can always get a 1/2" to 3/8" reducer.

One like this from Harbor Freight will work just fine for this and many other tasks:

http://www.harborfreight.com/1-2-half-inch-drive-click-stop-torque-wrench-239.html

If you want to spend more money and get a really good one, go for it.

I would also get a 3" extension and a deep well, 6pt impact socket to fit the rear. They're bigger and easier to grip. And they're inexpensive at HF.
 

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Tight enough is good enough if you have a feel for it. Too tight is too much. I use a torque wrench but I'm not anal about it and if I have to do it away from my toolbox, I'm not worried.
 

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I would invest in a torque wrench if it were me asking. I personally would choose a 1/2 inch drive for this.:thumbup::thumbup::thumbup:
 

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I always use a torque wrench (1/2" click type) on the wheel lugs of all my vehicles. IMO its too easy to under or over tighten them, both of which can cause problems.

This mainly started when we had a tire shop install new tires on our Jaguar a few years ago...they used a torque stick with an impact and something went wrong. 3 of the lugs on one wheel were on so tight the $450 wheel got destroyed chiseling them off. No more torque sticks or tightening by feel for me (and no more Jaguars either, but that's a whole other story for a different forum). Also, my friend brought his Passat over to try and remove lugs a VW dealer put on with torque sticks...my 650ft/lb impact could not remove those. Not good if stranded in the middle of no where with no cell service and a wimpy factory lug wrench.

Even when having a tire/auto shop do the work, I aways ask if they torque the lugs by hand. If they use the sticks, I ask them to torque them low and finish them off with the manual wrench, or go manual all the way. I have never have had a problem since. If it is a roadside emergency, I will do by feel and re-torque as soon as possible. Seems like the lug wrenches included with vehicles these days will break or strip before you get anywhere near over torquing a lug.
 

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Torque it. On a ride last year one rider needed a tire, like quick. We sheared a 3/8" extension trying to remove the wheel at the motel. Managed to nurse it about 15 miles to a shop. It was all their impact could do to remove all 5 lugs. Some previous richardhead must have tightened them with a cheater? Get a 1/2" torque wrench, plenty more uses than the lugs.

.
 

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About three years ago my R1100RT was passed by my back wheel. Yup- just riding down the road and after feeling a sudden wobble the rear of my bike came crashing down as my rear wheel parted company from the rest of my bike. I was able to get it to the side of the road (only going about 35 mph thank God) and had a wrecker take it to the BMW shop for $2500 in repairs that thankfully my insurance paid. It seems that I had used less than half of the torque required on the 5 bolts necessary to hold my rear wheel on to my single sided swingarm and even though I had ridden it over 2,000 miles that way it finally lost its final bolt and WHAM the wheel fell off.

So trust me on this one- make doubledang sure you got those bolts tightened down right. That certainly caused one big laundry problem for my wife on that day!
 

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Many Engineering studies have proven the folks are not very good at guessing torque.

Buy a wrench (even a cheap one is better than guessing) to minimize breaking studs, losing wheels, stripping threads, etc.

Peace of mind is good
 

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I use a craftsman 1/2" and torque to 80ft/lb like specified. It's easy to do. Another thing, having nice sockets help. I bought this set and the sockets pretty much fit any car/truck/motorcycle. Even axle nuts and countershaft sprockets on chain drive bikes. Not cheap Harbor Freight tools, but I like having the right tool and decent quality that doesn't break after a couple uses.
http://www.thetoolwarehouse.net/p-10302-sunex-international-2849.aspx
 

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The local Harbor Freight is having a sale on their 1/2 inch torque wrenches. From memory I think they are going for about 14 dollars. A deal and you will have lots of other uses for it.
 

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I had a guy with a Ford f150 lose a left rear on the street in front of my house. He drove about 100 feet on the disc before getting it stopped (but he did have 3 other wheels). We didn't find that errant wheel until a week later on the golf course. You would be amazed how far that wheel traveled at 40MPH-- better than half a mile on grass. Story was he had a blow out on the freeway and AAA got him going with his own full sized spare tire the night before.

Get a torque wrench. You should check your cars with it too. Bring it home from Sam's or your next dealer rotation/change and make sure they are right (see above story). I have both loose and tight ones every time I bring it home from a rotation. Never trust the guys at the shop.
This bike ain't like the old bikes. You lose an axle nut on those old bikes, you probably won't notice for a long time. Lose lugs on these bikes, yikes!

Wing is 80lbs. My Avalanche 110. My dodge was 115. Besides, you will use it for other stuff eventually.
 

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Torque it. On a ride last year one rider needed a tire, like quick. We sheared a 3/8" extension trying to remove the wheel at the motel. Managed to nurse it about 15 miles to a shop. It was all their impact could do to remove all 5 lugs. Some previous richardhead must have tightened them with a cheater? Get a 1/2" torque wrench, plenty more uses than the lugs..
Come to think of it, I never did replace that 3/8" extension in my tool kit. :rolleyes:

Just glad it wasn't my Wing that needed the tire. :thumbup:

Oh yeah. Buy a torque wrench.
 

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Yes, buy a torque wrench. And get one with ft/lbs, not in/lbs. At least 3/8" but for the rear wheels, I prefer a 1/2". You can always get a 1/2" to 3/8" reducer.

One like this from Harbor Freight will work just fine for this and many other tasks:

http://www.harborfreight.com/1-2-half-inch-drive-click-stop-torque-wrench-239.html

If you want to spend more money and get a really good one, go for it.

I would also get a 3" extension and a deep well, 6pt impact socket to fit the rear. They're bigger and easier to grip. And they're inexpensive at HF.
Agree with Bartman and not to be a smart A**, but anyone who has the wherewithall to change their oun tires should certainly own a torque wrench.

Jeff..
 

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:agree: + how ever many. The old steel rims, just crank it. Aluminum rims are a different story. 80 ft/lb isn't as much as one might think and evenly tightening is best. It aint rocket science but needs to be done as close to right as possible.
They come in handy for all sorts of things. Oh yea, turn them back to zero when finished.

Best Wishes
 

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Discussion Starter #15
Thanks for all the info, I guess I am headed to the local Harbor Freight in the morning and torquing the lug nuts. All is well.
Jay
 

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IMO I would be Leary using a harbor freight torque wrench for anything critical. Craftsman as a minimum. I've had a CDI all metal clicker type (made by snapon) for a couple of years. Very good quality.

http://www.cditorque.com/
 

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:agree: + how ever many. The old steel rims, just crank it. Aluminum rims are a different story.
The GL rear wheel has steel inserts at the mating surface so you are essentially tightening a steel wheel. That said, get a torque wrench. You only have two wheels and losing one can kill you quickly.

See this thread: http://gl1800riders.com/forums/showthread.php?t=138676

Many lessons learned since that was written. I still check my torque every 2K miles.
 

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Even if you do have a dealer performance your maintenance at the very least...
inspect, what you expect.

It's your life on the line do you have faith in your mechanic at that level?
 

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I agree torque it, It's the right and safe thing to do. But I haven't seen any of the tire shops use a torque wrench on aluminum car rims? How about you guys? Hammer it up with an impact wrench is all I'm seeing.
 
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