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Discussion Starter #1
I tried to take my rear wheel off today but the lugs were awfully tight. Didn't want to bull hunch them and break something. My manual doesn't say anything about them being reverse threaded. Any help would be appreciated.
 

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Use a breaker bar, or a ratchet with a piece of pipe(metal or plastic) ( I know, I know) or best yet, an air wrench for "off" only.

Putt them back on with 80 foot pounds of torque and you are good to go.

When you get the wheel off, do some cleanin and inspectin!

Bulldog
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Thanks Bulldog. I tried a pipe for leverage. I guess I need to pull harder or find an impact wrench.
 

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VOL,

I will never say that you can't break the studs, but I have not seen any and we do about 75 - 100 GL 1800's a year.

They are standard thread.

Just tighter than all get out.

Bulldog
 

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Before you use the breaker bar etc I would soak them with a little penetrating oil. Put it on carefully so you don't get it all over everything.
If there's a second person around have them step on the rear brake while you break them loose. (Assuming you are up on the center stand). I had to have an extension on my ratchet also................ :)
 

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Discussion Starter #6
I was going to remove it to get my caliper off to change the pads even though the book said I didn't have to. I was having problems getting the pistons pushed in to get the new honda pads in place. Since I couldn't remove the wheel I went back to plan A. I finally got the pistons pushed in enough to get the new pads in but I couldn't see for sure in the right side that the pad was in the clip like I can on the left side. I'm pretty sure both are in fine. Just wanted to make sure. Thanks for all the help.
Brian T. in Tn.
Go Vols
 

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Brian.I use a length of pipe over the breaker bar for additional leverage,while I have one of my kids step on the brake pedal for me.
 

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CP 1/2" drive rattle gun backed by around 125 psi will zip 'em right off. Torque with good breakaway torque wrench to spce when done, pieceacake!
 

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I put the bike in reverse to lock the rear wheel. You can also use a torque wrench to remove bolts. Since 80 lb-ft is the spec, it shouldn't take more than 100 - 110 lb-ft to get them off.
 

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Wanderer said:
I put the bike in reverse to lock the rear wheel. You can also use a torque wrench to remove bolts. Since 80 lb-ft is the spec, it shouldn't take more than 100 - 110 lb-ft to get them off.

"shouldn't"............is the key word !!!! MY first time off I didn't think they were coming off!!!!!!!!..chuck
 

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I use a hammer. Just put the wrench on and give it a few taps toward the rear of the bike. They will come loose easy enough.
 

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An old plumbing trick that works well for frozen threads: Saturate lugs with PB Blaster (this stuff is great)then as strange as it may sound wait a half hour or so and try to tighten the lugs just a little then try to loosen them. This works 90% of the time on screws, bolts, pipes. good luck.
 

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Teaser, good suggestion. I use PB all the time. That stuf really helps. Go back and forth a couple of times. I use my Torque wrench when I am taking them off. It is pretty long and gives me good leverage. Next time you put the wheel on use some anti sieze on the studs. You only need a very little of it on there. You will never experience this again.
 

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Volcycle, The reason they are so tight -- kids at dealership-- using
an impact wrench. Tight and tighter. Ask your service manager to
torque all fastners to spects. when service is required. May not help but
you tried. galewing
 

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Rear Wheel Removal(lugs too tight)
Big Bertha must have been installing rear wheels that day. I think her sister, Betty the Brute, installs the oil filters! LOL....
 

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Thanks for your input Fred ... when I had my rear wheel off recently (the first time) I was concerned that I did everything "right" ... got up to 65-70 pounds and it just "felt right" so I quit ... seems like plenty to me. I've just recently started using a torque wrench after 60 years without. I think I've developed a pretty good "feel" over the years. I never break things by overtighting and have never had anything fall apart on it's own either ... :tools1:
 

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I encourage the use of the rear brake to hold the wheel/tire assembly steady rather than putting that kind of stress on the starter motor by using the electric reverse. Simply tie the brake peddle down or wedge it down.

I use a 30" breaker bar and sometimes its still a bit of a bear. I usta use a dib of anti-sieze on the lugs and then would reduce the applied torque by some very significant amount, but was convinced by Stu Oltman to change my evil ways and to use clean dry parts and the Honda specified torque. I like the idea of the HillBilly impact wrench (mallet and stout wrench) and the PB sounds very reasonable if it leaves no lubricant residue.

I am not sure that I fully buy into the "use clean and dry parts with specified torque" theory, even though I follow the sage advice given by the expert. Rain, road salts, galvonic reaction between the three different metals,and time really freeze the lugs in there with that standard method. Its a bit of a chore to use a wire brush each time to obtain clean and dry parts (lug nut threads and stud threads. Its hard to believe that the applied torque to the different lugs actually yields anything near a consistent holding torque among the various lugs upon completion of the job. So, it is very tempting to go back to using a bit of antisieze and greatly lowering the applied torque in an attempt to not obtain an over torque when finished. Bolt stretch keeps the lugs sucure, not corrosion. Still, when a competent and recognized authority takes time to offer sage advice, it is "nuts" not to pay attention.

prs
 

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Pigeon Roost said:
Rain, road salts, galvonic reaction between the three different metals,and time really freeze the lugs in there with that standard method.
My suspicion is what really freezes the lugs on, is heat from the rear brake which gets transmitted through the studs to wheel, coupled with water which accelerates the corrosion process. This is why I really think anti-sieze on the studs is a good idea.

FYI, I have heard of at least two separate incidents of the studs shearing off when folks went to remove the bolts, cause they were frozen on with corrosion. When this happens, you end up replacing the entire rear drive unit. A little prevention (anti-sieze) can end up saving you big bucks and lots of heartache.
 
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