GL1800Riders Forums banner
21 - 40 of 58 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
684 Posts
Last year I traded in my 2016 Goldwing for a 2021 Can Am Spyder. The Goldwing was just getting to be too much for me at then 78, but I was far from ready to give up riding. And my wife rides as passenger much of the time so I wasn't going to get a small, lightweight two wheeler instead of the Wing. In truth I love the Spyder and the stability and comfort that it offers, and while I thought it would really bother me, it hasn't bothered me much to give up the leaning in curves.

I also have a 150cc scooter in the garage that I thought would satisfy my need for a 2 wheeler when the urge struck, but I am finding that the scooter just doesn't really satisfy me, despite it being a fun little thing to ride. So I'm thinking of getting another bike, in addition to the Spyder, that would be just for me (no passenger) that would be lightweight but capable of comfortably riding on any roads, including the Interstate highways. Almost any motorcycle would seem lightweight when compared to the 900+ pounds of the Goldwing, and I don't think a 450 or 500 pound bike would be a problem as long as it wasn't one with a high seat height (I'm afraid I have gone down from 5'8" to 5'7" as I have aged).

What bikes (new) do you think I should consider when I go shopping in the Spring, assuming I am still on the green side of the grass as I turn 80?
Ninja H2R....make sure it's the R version
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,973 Posts
Vito has asked a common question for us guys/gals. The two biggest reasons why I ride a Goldwing are Comfort ( #1) and reliability (#2). At my young age (70) I would never compromise on comfort; a comfortable seat to sit my a** in for at least 12 continuous hours and wind and noise protection. From my limited experience (I’ve only owned three other bikes other than a Goldwing) comfort is subjective. One of the bikes I owned was a Honda ST 1100. I bought it based on things other riders reported on their comfort riding the bike. After riding the ST for two hours I had to get off it. It was a miserably uncomfortable ride. I sold it within six months at a loss. The problem with selecting any bike is having the ability to test ride one over several days or at least on a long day’s ride. If only someone could come up with an answer to that issue.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
269 Posts
Honda Rebel 1100 DCT Touring. Under 600 lbs, DCT for guys like me with arthritic hands, low center of gravity, tools along anywhere easily.
That is slick looking. For me wish it was offered in manual and non chain drive.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
216 Posts
At 3.6 gallons, not much of a gas tank on the Rebel bagger.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,284 Posts
Vito,

Well, now you’ve had almost every motorcycle manufactured from scooters to a new generation ‘18+ Wing recommended as a second bike.

What have you learned? What bikes have been recommended that now interest you?

Tim
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,408 Posts
Ninja H2R....make sure it's the R version
Not sure at 80 years old Vito is looking for such a bike...

At 3.6 gallons, not much of a gas tank on the Rebel bagger.
Is not built for cross country riding... that's a standard tank for such a bike.

yeah it says 3.6 including 1.1 gallon reserve on Honda's website. So I assume that would put total at 4.7 gallon. Or does that mean it is part of the 3.6.
It's likely 3.6 capacity, with "low fuel" light on at 1.1 gallon...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,549 Posts
OK, I've tried hard to hold back on slamming bike companies for their choices of motorcycles to produce, but I can't stand it any longer, I've got to vent. I'm pretty close in age to a lot of you here, and probably older than the average member. Therefore, I understand VITO's situation. He still has the desire to ride, but at his age(and mine) the body forces limitations on us. I don't need to go through all of the issues, as most of you have had a lot of them way before even I have.

I can boil down my complaint to a simple issue. If you want a lighter weight bike(like me and Vito do) but don't want one that requires you to crawl around on the floor lubing a CHAIN, and replacing Sprockets, you have very few ECONOMICAL choices. The folks that say it isn't a big deal, you can do it in fifteen minutes, don't understand the physical limitations we have at our age. WE just can't do those "floor exercises" at over 70 and 80 years old.

I know manufacturers use a chain as a lighter alternative to a shaft drive. But that also transfers a lot of the COST of maintenance to the BUYER. Chain is less expensive and weighs less....BIG WIN for lowering manufacturing costs. BIG LOSS for the customer. Solution: BELT DRIVE!!!

Now here is where I get lost because of my lack of mechanical knowledge: Would it really be a big difference in cost to the manufacturer to use a belt drive as opposed to a chain drive? By using a basically "no maintenance" belt drive on a 650-750cc bike, it would give us old timers a reason to keep riding longer. What am I missing here?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,284 Posts
OK, I've tried hard to hold back on slamming bike companies for their choices of motorcycles to produce, but I can't stand it any longer, I've got to vent. I'm pretty close in age to a lot of you here, and probably older than the average member. Therefore, I understand VITO's situation. He still has the desire to ride, but at his age(and mine) the body forces limitations on us. I don't need to go through all of the issues, as most of you have had a lot of them way before even I have.

I can boil down my complaint to a simple issue. If you want a lighter weight bike(like me and Vito do) but don't want one that requires you to crawl around on the floor lubing a CHAIN, and replacing Sprockets, you have very few ECONOMICAL choices. The folks that say it isn't a big deal, you can do it in fifteen minutes, don't understand the physical limitations we have at our age. WE just can't do those "floor exercises" at over 70 and 80 years old.

I know manufacturers use a chain as a lighter alternative to a shaft drive. But that also transfers a lot of the COST of maintenance to the BUYER. Chain is less expensive and weighs less....BIG WIN for lowering manufacturing costs. BIG LOSS for the customer. Solution: BELT DRIVE!!!

Now here is where I get lost because of my lack of mechanical knowledge: Would it really be a big difference in cost to the manufacturer to use a belt drive as opposed to a chain drive? By using a basically "no maintenance" belt drive on a 650-750cc bike, it would give us old timers a reason to keep riding longer. What am I missing here?
The point you are missing is that any new motorcycle is not produced SOLELY on the basis of minimizing the cost of production.

I just watched a motorcycle tv show in which a Canadian motorcycle designer (who worked for Yamaha corporate in Japan) described in detail the CORPORATE Japanese process for designing a new motorcycle.

The Japanese new motorcycle design process starts with 3 teams: Engineering, Design, and Product Planning.

This group of 3 specialists is assigned to WRITE A DESCRIPTION OF THE POTENTIAL CUSTOMER. This customer description is revised numerous times until it is approved.

When the customer description is approved, the 3 teams are sent away to propose the characteristics/features/components of the proposed new motorcycle their individual team wants. Revisions are done over and over again until agreement is reached. In the end, none of the 3 specialist teams gets everything they want.

And THAT laundry list of COMPROMISES is what gets built.

And for folks who ask questions such as, why isn’t the new Wing lighter? faster? why doesn’t it have more fuel capacity? Why aren’t the saddlebags bigger? The above corporate new motorcycle design process is your answer.

Tim
 
21 - 40 of 58 Posts
Top