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So far I've heard good things about the Roadsmith. My question is, being that the wheelbase is longer than the other conversions, wouldn't you have a greater chance of scraping bottom? 2ndly, your turning radius would be larger. Could that be and issue around hair pin turns?
 

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Jake,

Good questions! yes, the longer wheelbase does tend to probably allow the bottom to scrape in certain cirucumstances, especially like when you drive up a ramp into a trailer, etc. But to tell you the truth, I don't believe there is that much difference in any of the kits in this regard. The Wing is pretty low to the ground to begin with. On two wheels, if you cross a speed bump at 90 degrees, you'd better be thinking about that loud noise that's liable to be heard, and it ain't pretty. Same with a Wing triked, any brand. It's a good idea with any of them to cross those kinds of obstructions at an angle and slowly. Potholes are the same, except those are hard to cross at an angle ... it all depends on how deep the hole is. I make it a point to avoid potholes if at all possible, slow down for gutters that have sharp angles and cross them at an angle if at all possible, and pay attention to avoid any other situation where the front tire and wheel might drop low enough to cause the front end to touch down. Rear wheels do not cause much, if any, problem. Any serious bump will be felt, two wheels or three! The benefits of the longer wheelbase on the RoadSmith and the Hannigan outweigh any possible negatives, in my opinion.

The ride is more comfortable, the wife does not sit directly atop the rear axle but rather a bit in front of it, and that makes it easier for her when you hit a bump. The longer turning radius results in a bit less twitchy steering and it will only affect you when making very slow speed U-turns. It does not significantly affect staying in your lane on any kind of curve I've ever negotiated. If a car can make the turn and stay in it's lane, you can do even better on the RoadSmith. It's my considered opinion that the longer wheelbased trikes are a bit more stable going down the road or even in the curves because the steering is just a bit slower, especially when the rake kits are installed.

With any trike, there is a period of adjustment just like with any change of vehicle. You will learn it's limits and ride or drive accordingly. I say you will not be handicapped in any significant way with any of them. Having a powered reverse means you don't get into a bind if you can't turn around without having to back up for some reason. I try to avoid those situations anyway. My trike does not have the aqua shields or floorboards. Those might tend to make the trike even lower to the ground or touch down in some situations ... others will speak to that. Just remember than all of them are pretty close to the ground. Your concerns should not be a problem, in my experience. I can also tell you that I have had zero complaints with our RoadSmith in over 2 1/2 years of serious riding. It has been very comfortable, very reliable, and a huge joy to own and ride. I don't personally think you can do better!!
 

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So far I've heard good things about the Roadsmith. My question is, being that the wheelbase is longer than the other conversions, wouldn't you have a greater chance of scraping bottom? 2ndly, your turning radius would be larger. Could that be and issue around hair pin turns?
Speaking as the owner of a longer wheel base trike,(Hannigan) no greater chance of scraping bottom unless you have the foot fairings. They can be a concern over some parking lot speed bumps, ext wheel base or not!
There is no problem with "hair pin" turns. The turning radius is not much different!
Sounds like a good loooong test ride is in order for you!
It took me almost 4yrs of study and testing and visiting manufacturers to pick the one right for me.
No one can tell you which one is right for you. You must decide for yourself.
IMO Roadsmith is a good one, as is MotorTrike and Hannigan GenI. I can not speak to how good the Hannigan GenII is for the 2012/13 Wings but, they are ugly IMO:eek:4:
A rake kit for the forks should be considered for much easier steering.
 

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I have no problem cornering the Arkansas twisties with my RS. Also, sitting side by side with another club member, my RS is considering higher off the ground than his Motor Trike and I don't drag speed bumps. You need to put eyeballs on different trikes, ride them, then make decision. Extrapolating answers from bad information will not result in accurate answers.;)
 

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Jake,

The ride is more comfortable, the wife does not sit directly atop the rear axle but rather a bit in front of it, and that makes it easier for her when you hit a bump. !!
I've often heard this and wonder how much in front of the axle does the passenger set. It it a couple feet? If only a few inches I wonder if she would know the difference.
 

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The Roadsmith is an excellent well built kit with good rear end suspension options. I also favor the Hannigan which is another top of the line kit. As far as I'm concerned flip a coin for which one looks the best to you IMHO. P.S. Turning radius and hairpin turns are not an issue with either one I currently own. As far as scraping bottom if you have no aqua shields installed (ie: lower foot fairings to some) and risers in the front fork tubes it was not an issue for me for the most part. Adding lower foot fairings makes it a little closer to the ground usually in the front but I've not seen much of anything in the way of speed bumps I couldn't get over at an angle or go around in the case of wide taller ones if I needed to of which about all speed bumps are in parking lots or very slow speed areas.
 

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Bad noises over speed bumps has a lot to do with your speed, and a couple of mph can make a big difference. So can rollin' over them at 90 degrees as opposed to a bit of an angle crossing. Let me just say it makes sense to be watching for them and see them before your front wheel starts over them!

Shimpy,

The difference is inches. I dunno for sure how many, but I could measure my RS to see, I guess. We formerly rode a CSC on a GL 1500, and the CSC had a solid rear axle. So there are actually several things different between that one and our present ride. All I can tell you is that my wife says there is a big difference for her as far as comfort goes. She says that when we hit a bump in the road (going straight away where both rear wheels cross the bump at the same time or nearly so) when on the RS/GL 1800, the bump is not nearly as much of a shock to her. The IRS makes a difference when one or the other rear wheel hits a bump, and the difference in the type of suspension probably also plays a part. I may be comparing apples to oranges, but I do know that in pictures of both machines, the rear axle is farther behind the rear seat area. And I definitely know that my wife does not wish to return to our former ride! I have also heard similar comments from a few friends who have ridden other brands and now ride a RS kit. And the ride is much better for me as well. Subjective evaluation from the seat of our pants!!
 

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If I remember correctly, Roadsmith places axle 8" behind the original bike location which is significant. Same ride difference as a short wheel based auto versus long; much smoother.
 

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No one has mentioned a very important question you need to answer. Who will build and or service your trike? The best trike is only as good as the installer doing the installation! Most important to me was. I didn't want to travel 3 hours each way to get it serviced! One hour was tops to me. :thumbup: Tom :trike:
 
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