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I really like the way my Dunlop ROF behaves but I'm concerned that I won't know if it has lost pressure while I'm moving. My '08 PA GL1800 doesn't have many bells and whistles and, for sure doesn't have a remote tire pressure sensor. Should I get one and, if so, what is available out there?:shrug:

Any help anyone can give me will be greatly appreciated...
 

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I use this

I use this, you can get it from our sponsor, amazon, ebay, etc. My riding partner also uses it. I velcroed mine to the dash when riding. Be aware the display is not waterproof, I sprayed mine with chartpac clear spray to water-resistant it.

Highly recommend you put the metal stems on, not use with the rubber ones.

http://www.directlineparts.com/product.asp?pid=44456&str=0
 

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I use this, you can get it from our sponsor, amazon, ebay, etc. My riding partner also uses it. I velcroed mine to the dash when riding. Be aware the display is not waterproof, I sprayed mine with chartpac clear spray to water-resistant it.

Highly recommend you put the metal stems on, not use with the rubber ones.

http://www.directlineparts.com/product.asp?pid=44456&str=0
:agree::thumbup:I have used this system for 2 1/2 years. I change the batteries every winter as part of my maintenance schedule and it has worked flawlessly for me. I have the display module attached to the top of my left speaker grill, where I can instantly view it, by industrial strengh velcro. I have not had a problem with it coming loose.
 

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I really like the way my Dunlop ROF behaves but I'm concerned that I won't know if it has lost pressure while I'm moving. My '08 PA GL1800 doesn't have many bells and whistles and, for sure doesn't have a remote tire pressure sensor. Should I get one and, if so, what is available out there?:shrug:

Any help anyone can give me will be greatly appreciated...
I don't have a TPMS & I have run many run-flats. While the TPMS is a nice option, it is far more important (in my mind) for you to check your tires routinely and know how your bike feels as the tire pressure drops. Do yourself a favor...take your run-flat equipped bike out and ride it a few miles (curves and straight road). Then let out 5 psi and ride the same road again. Keep repeating this until the pressure gets down to say 15 psi. From that point on you will know when the tire is getting low. If you do this, let us know your findings.
 

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I don't have a TPMS & I have run many run-flats. While the TPMS is a nice option, it is far more important (in my mind) for you to check your tires routinely and know how your bike feels as the tire pressure drops. Do yourself a favor...take your run-flat equipped bike out and ride it a few miles (curves and straight road). Then let out 5 psi and ride the same road again. Keep repeating this until the pressure gets down to say 15 psi. From that point on you will know when the tire is getting low. If you do this, let us know your findings.
Very good advice TravelinLite!:thumbup::thumbup::thumbup:
 

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I don't have a TPMS & I have run many run-flats. While the TPMS is a nice option, it is far more important (in my mind) for you to check your tires routinely and know how your bike feels as the tire pressure drops. Do yourself a favor...take your run-flat equipped bike out and ride it a few miles (curves and straight road). Then let out 5 psi and ride the same road again. Keep repeating this until the pressure gets down to say 15 psi. From that point on you will know when the tire is getting low. If you do this, let us know your findings.
A TPMS will never take the place of routine tire checks, that being said, when ever I feel something different in the seat of my pants (No not that something) the first place my eyes go to is the TPMS. Even though I run a runflat, I can tell the difference with a 3-5 lb drop in pressure. The tail end will waddle a little bit. If I have no abnormal reading and the feeling is still there, I find a safe place to pull off and do a complete tire check on the spot.
 

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If TPMS gives you peace of mind, then by all means get it! It's your wing, you can get what you want for it!:thumbup::thumbup::thumbup:
 

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If TPMS gives you peace of mind, then by all means get it! It's your wing, you can get what you want for it!:thumbup::thumbup::thumbup:
I wouldn't go so far as to say it gives me piece of mind, maybe a heads up to what may be going on with that little patch of air that separates me from the road surface. :coffee1:
 

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Mine has alerted me twice while riding of ROF'S losing air. I am the "nail Magnet!"
 

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If you use a RF on the 'wing
.. you should really have some type of TPMS!

couple of reasons IMHO...

1)
I run rear pressures at about 30-33
If you're cruising on the interstate and start to lose air
it is VERY hard to notice the pressure dropping into the low 20's
but the tire sure does start to heat up.
Most people won't notice it until they turn to exit at a ramp..
.. then you've got a moderately wiggly bike under you.
... might not be fun at night... or in the rain.

2) I check my air pressure often.
Most of the air loss in the tire (if you check it often),
comes from checking it often...
.. it's very easy to lose a couple of lbs or more per week.
With a TPMS I can now "see" the pressure without letting any air out.
I now "lose" only about 2-3 lbs per month.

my two cents...
... use a RF?, get a TPMS!

Dennis
 

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I agree with Wingwing above.

On CARS TPMS is REQUIRED by law with run flat tires. Bikes don't come with run flat tires so there is no requirement.

Most flat tires occur while you are driving because the vehicle in front of you, or your front tire, will run over something laying flat on the road and stand it up so your tire, usual the rear tire, runs over it and you have a puncture. Most of the time it stays in the hole it just made and you now have a slow leak while you are still riding. If it comes out you have a fast leak now. With a normal tire the bike will usually let you know by the time you are 5 psi low or so. With a stiffer runflat you will be at a much lower pressure by the time the bike actually lets you know, on a flat straight freeway it might not let you know much at all.
Even if you check your air pressure every time right before you ride, it wont help you when a nail goes through your tire on the road. A good TPMS working properly will tell you during your ride if you are losing air and how fast you are losing it. If you run a runflat tire because of the safety aspect why wouldn't you run a TPMS for safety too? The bonus is it works on your non runflat front tire too.
 

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Must have one ? No....... Good idea to have one ? Yes
 

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Discussion Starter #14
seems necessary because I'm headed for Alaska soon.

I stop about every two hours on long trips so I can do 150 to 180 miles between pressure checks...I've had a blowout on a rear so I think I will add a TPMS to the bike..

Thanks for everyone's input!
 
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