GL1800Riders Forums banner

1 - 17 of 17 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
229 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
How hard is it to replace the switch bottons on the right switch housing.cruise switch/reverse switch.I have a all must new switch housing for a 2005 gl1800 and mind is a 2002.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
325 Posts
Unless your having big problems with your switches, have cleaned and lubed them with no fix. I would not bother.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6 Posts
Starter/reverse switch

I too wonder about the switch assembly. Sometimes the headlight will not come on until I wiggle the start/reverse switch. Will cleaning and lube help or?
2003 GW trike...just bought it and several questions about it.:?:
Sparky NM
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
19,989 Posts
In most cases, these switches are not actually defective. It is usually just dirt and oxidation that causes problems. In the case of the starter switch, I would think that since it gets used so much, it is quite possible for the plating to wear off the contacts. Cleaning would only be a temporary fix in those cases.

Replacing the switches piece by piece would mean desoldering the old ones and soldering in new ones. It could be done if you really don't want to take apart the ones you have and clean them. But keep in mind that there is no slack in those wires. You can't cut the ends off and re-strip them to clean up the ends.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,613 Posts
I too wonder about the switch assembly. Sometimes the headlight will not come on until I wiggle the start/reverse switch. Will cleaning and lube help or?
2003 GW trike...just bought it and several questions about it.:?:
Sparky NM
Cleaning is a very easy and low cost alternative. See how here: >Start button maintenance<

It is advised that working all the switches before you turn on the key once each riding day will keep them functioning.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
229 Posts
Discussion Starter #6
both of the switch are shot the cruise does not ingage at all .and the reverse switch hangs up all the time.I tried to clean them but does work.Can I take the switchs out the 2005 housing and put in the 2002 housing All I should need to do is split the wire harness.Or will someone trade my 2005 switch housing for the 2002 switch housing.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,353 Posts
If you are talking about swapping the complete switch assy I believe they are wired differently. For instance the 05 will have lights inside the switches and the 01,02,03 did not. Someone recently, maybe Techdude, mentioned there are other wiring differences.

Wayne
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
19,989 Posts
both of the switch are shot the cruise does not ingage at all .and the reverse switch hangs up all the time.I tried to clean them but does work.Can I take the switchs out the 2005 housing and put in the 2002 housing All I should need to do is split the wire harness.Or will someone trade my 2005 switch housing for the 2002 switch housing.
As I mentioned earlier, yes you can. There are a couple of ways to do it. You can either solder each one in individually, or you can cut the harness off about a foot down and splice it in somewhere along the handlebar. You can probably slide the sleeving off to remove the wires you don't need for the 02, and then slide the sleeve back on. You would also have to find a way to waterproof the sleeving where it was cut. It would be a lot of work either way. There is no easy way out.

FWIW, I apologize for beating a dead horse here, but if you just sprayed cleaner in the switches, while that works sometimes, the proper way is to take them apart and clean them. As long as you don't lose the little parts, it's would be faster than what you are proposing, and it nearly always makes them function like new again. It can be difficult if you are not used to working with tiny parts, but it is do-able.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
19,989 Posts
With all due respect to Waldo and the hard work he did on his site, I recommend that you never clean contacts with anything highly abrasive, like a Scotchbrite pad. Use a simple pencil eraser. It will clean the oxidation and dirt off in seconds.

Abrasives will easily remove the thin plating from the contacts, which will make them prone to rust. It will also put microscopic scratches in the plating, which not only increases contact resistance, but will also promote corrosion and prevent the sliding contacts from cleaning themselves with each pass. You want those contacts to be as smooth and shiny as possible.

The only time I ever use abrasives is when arcing has started to eat into the contacts. But that will never happen with these low voltage switches.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,613 Posts
With all due respect to Waldo and the hard work he did on his site, I recommend that you never clean contacts with anything highly abrasive, like a Scotchbrite pad. Use a simple pencil eraser. It will clean the oxidation and dirt off in seconds.

Abrasives will easily remove the thin plating from the contacts, which will make them prone to rust. It will also put microscopic scratches in the plating, which not only increases contact resistance, but will also promote corrosion and prevent the sliding contacts from cleaning themselves with each pass. You want those contacts to be as smooth and shiny as possible.

The only time I ever use abrasives is when arcing has started to eat into the contacts. But that will never happen with these low voltage switches.
With all due respect to Larry, whom I hold in high regard, the start switch is not a low voltage switch per se. If one is in the habit of leaving on the hi beams, and I know several folks who never turn them off unless asked to do so in a group ride*, a full 55 watts will get switched there. The left hi does not use a relay but is powered directly. The text in my description on that page is a leftover from my Valkyrie days when there were no relays used. I included instructions to add a relay to ease the pain, but Valkyrie start switches were prone to pitting and eventually melting on any given day.
:fullsize:


I will amend my gold wing >start button< page to include the pencil eraser with the caution that if pitting is evident then.... And I will add to this post that all screws are #2 Phillips no matter how small they appear to be.

*in a group ride where you are not the leader, it is discourteous to run a modulator or your hi beams.



 

·
Registered
Joined
·
679 Posts
JIS Screwdrivers

I ordered a set of JIS Screwdriver for my GL1800. The Japanese Industry Standard bits seat really nicely on my GL1800. No more stripped Phillips screws. Fund them on e-Bay.
With all due respect to Larry, whom I hold in high regard, the start switch is not a low voltage switch per se. If one is in the habit of leaving on the hi beams, and I know several folks who never turn them off unless asked to do so in a group ride*, a full 55 watts will get switched there. The left hi does not use a relay but is powered directly. The text in my description on that page is a leftover from my Valkyrie days when there were no relays used. I included instructions to add a relay to ease the pain, but Valkyrie start switches were prone to pitting and eventually melting on any given day.
:fullsize:


I will amend my gold wing >start button< page to include the pencil eraser with the caution that if pitting is evident then.... And I will add to this post that all screws are #2 Phillips no matter how small they appear to be.

*in a group ride where you are not the leader, it is discourteous to run a modulator or your hi beams.



 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,285 Posts
Arcing switches

With all due respect to Larry, whom I hold in high regard, the start switch is not a low voltage switch per se. If one is in the habit of leaving on the hi beams, and I know several folks who never turn them off unless asked to do so in a group ride*, a full 55 watts will get switched there. The left hi does not use a relay but is powered directly. The text in my description on that page is a leftover from my Valkyrie days when there were no relays used. I included instructions to add a relay to ease the pain, but Valkyrie start switches were prone to pitting and eventually melting on any given day.
:fullsize:


I will amend my gold wing >start button< page to include the pencil eraser with the caution that if pitting is evident then.... And I will add to this post that all screws are #2 Phillips no matter how small they appear to be.

*in a group ride where you are not the leader, it is discourteous to run a modulator or your hi beams.



In most circles, a 12v switch would be considered a low voltage switch, so those switches are indeed low voltage switches. It is the voltage, not the power that will cause arcing which is what LarryM was referring to. Therefore, you would not have the problem of arcing in these switches even if they do carry a few amps of current. Look at it this way. If you have 200,000 volts with microamp capacity, that will arc if given a chance. If you have 1 volt with hundreds of amps available it will still not arc.

The reason I used the 100 amp example, is it is really hard to move that much current with only 1 volt behind it. That takes a mighty good conductor with such low voltage.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
19,989 Posts
Waldo is right about this one. I had forgotten about that one switch and the high beam problem, although I can't imagine a situation where my high beams would be on when I shut my ignition off. That is the only switch on the pod where this would apply. The rest of them on both handlebars are all low level signal lines, except for the kill switch and high beam switch. Honda has a kit to repair the kill switch, and the high beam switch is normally not a problem area.

When these switches are torn down, I generally would only clean them if they are in good condition, where dirt and oxidation is the only problem, and most of the time that is all you will find. In the case of the starter switch, if I ever came across pitting from arcing, that is damage, not dirt and oxidation related. Any burnishing of pitted contacts should be considered a temporary fix in most cases. I don't believe in repairing damaged contacts as a permanent fix.

Of course, everyone will have their own methods and beliefs as to what they are comfortable with. I won't sit here and claim that my way is the only way.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,613 Posts
The reason I used the 100 amp example, is it is really hard to move that much current with only 1 volt behind it. That takes a mighty good conductor with such low voltage.
I believe that both Larry and I were referring to the fact that these switches all excite relays and used the term "voltage" as a generic term. Valkyrie start switches were prone to arcing, melting and all sorts of problems. They are also 12v switches.

Here's a look at one from the GL and one from the Valkyrie (which is new). Both employ the same spring loaded shunts.



Thanks for all your Help Ill try and clean the switches before I do anything else.
the start switch can be cleaned by spraying plastic safe contact cleaner along the top line of the switch while working it bin and out. This might be a stopgap measure or could, if repeated on a regular basis, be a cure. None of the other switches will get a good bath from the outside so getting in there and doing the right thing is best.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,285 Posts
My mistake

I believe that both Larry and I were referring to the fact that these switches all excite relays and used the term "voltage" as a generic term. Valkyrie start switches were prone to arcing, melting and all sorts of problems. They are also 12v switches.

[stuff deleted]
You are right and I was off base. If I would have engaged my brain before typing, I would have realized what you were saying and what was happening. Thanks for your patient explanation.
 
1 - 17 of 17 Posts
Top