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I have enjoyed the use of my Smartire TPMS System on my 2003 wing now for about 8 years. I am on the original sensors. I think my rear sensor is finally dying. Yesterday, the tire temperature was not reporting out as it normally would. Smartire was one of the first successful TPMS systems that could be installed on motorcycles and in my estimation still one of the best. One of the things I have liked about this system is that it reports the pressure, current temperature inside the tire, and how much the tire pressure has changed from baseline after temperature correction ie +1, +2 or -1, -2, etc. After going through several rear tires it is a little surprising how different tire brands are in terms of heat production. Unfortunately the company no longer seems to be around and I am looking for a replacement system.

I have been reading the reviews and see that many like the Doran system. My only hesitations are that the sensors if mounted externally can be a source of leak and the cost for replacement every couple years.

I also found mobiletron and wondered if anyone had tried this?

http://www.mobiletron.com.tw/b_eng_products_view.asp?FkindNo=F000004&SkindNo=S000032&Pd_Id=3559

Are there any other systems that are up and coming?

Thanks,
Don
 

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I have enjoyed the use of my Smartire TPMS System on my 2003 wing now for about 8 years. I am on the original sensors. I think my rear sensor is finally dying. Yesterday, the tire temperature was not reporting out as it normally would. Smartire was one of the first successful TPMS systems that could be installed on motorcycles and in my estimation still one of the best. One of the things I have liked about this system is that it reports the pressure, current temperature inside the tire, and how much the tire pressure has changed from baseline after temperature correction ie +1, +2 or -1, -2, etc. After going through several rear tires it is a little surprising how different tire brands are in terms of heat production. Unfortunately the company no longer seems to be around and I am looking for a replacement system.

I have been reading the reviews and see that many like the Doran system. My only hesitations are that the sensors if mounted externally can be a source of leak and the cost for replacement every couple years.

I also found mobiletron and wondered if anyone had tried this?

http://www.mobiletron.com.tw/b_eng_products_view.asp?FkindNo=F000004&SkindNo=S000032&Pd_Id=3559

Are there any other systems that are up and coming?

Thanks,
Don
I plan on buying the Doran. I am going to mount it on the inside. They furnish the valve stems in the kit, so they won't leak. Good luck.
 

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I too have the Smartire system. I love it. I think the truck sensors will work with the receiver we have. Maybe someone will chime in that tried them. I like this system and would like to keep it.
 

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I think that Smartire was the best TPMS system made for a motorcycle. I didn't particularly like the way the sensors mounted, but the functionality of the unit more than made up for it.

My last Smartire burned up with when my house and garage went up in smoke, but if I did still have it, I would look into replacing the battery.
I know the sensors are not intended to be serviced, but neither are the Honda sensors, and FredH has been changing batteries in them. What do you have to lose in trying?
 

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The Mobiletron system looks a lot like the old SmartTire system and has my interest. Thanks for posting about it.
 

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The Doran sensors can be mounted internally or externally. There are advantages/disadvantages to both methods.
That's interesting.
Dose the Doran system read tire temperature when mounted internally?
 

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No. It doesn't read temperature when mounted internally either.

Based on pressure increase and the external air temp, you can make a pretty good guess as to the internal tire air temp though.

That's interesting.
Dose the Doran system read tire temperature when mounted internally?
 

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I don't care about the temp. I can't do anything about that. I can do something about the air pressure.
Monitoring tire temperature can tell you more than just watching pressure.
Pressure and temperature rise and fall in proportion with one another, but other things can cause a tire to get hot.
In 2010, on my way to Chattanooga, my Smartire TPMS went off because my rear tire was getting hot. I watched the temperature on the display and saw that it was steadily climbing, so I pulled off to check it out.
My load had shifted forward in my trailer. I reloaded and continued on while watching tire temp, but had no further problems. If it had not, warned me, I would likely have experienced a catastrophic tire failure.

My current TPMS allows me to monitor either pressure or temp. It defaults to pressure, but I usually switch over to temp once both sensors have registered. The light will warn me if pressure drops.
 

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I have enjoyed the use of my Smartire TPMS System on my 2003 wing now for about 8 years. I am on the original sensors. I think my rear sensor is finally dying. Yesterday, the tire temperature was not reporting out as it normally would. Smartire was one of the first successful TPMS systems that could be installed on motorcycles and in my estimation still one of the best. One of the things I have liked about this system is that it reports the pressure, current temperature inside the tire, and how much the tire pressure has changed from baseline after temperature correction ie +1, +2 or -1, -2, etc. After going through several rear tires it is a little surprising how different tire brands are in terms of heat production. Unfortunately the company no longer seems to be around and I am looking for a replacement system.

I have been reading the reviews and see that many like the Doran system. My only hesitations are that the sensors if mounted externally can be a source of leak and the cost for replacement every couple years.

I also found mobiletron and wondered if anyone had tried this?

http://www.mobiletron.com.tw/b_eng_products_view.asp?FkindNo=F000004&SkindNo=S000032&Pd_Id=3559

Are there any other systems that are up and coming?

Thanks,
Don
I like the looks of this unit do you know the price or can anyone order off of there web site . edwinger
 

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Monitoring tire temperature can tell you more than just watching pressure.
Pressure and temperature rise and fall in proportion with one another, but other things can cause a tire to get hot.
In 2010, on my way to Chattanooga, my Smartire TPMS went off because my rear tire was getting hot. I watched the temperature on the display and saw that it was steadily climbing, so I pulled off to check it out.
My load had shifted forward in my trailer. I reloaded and continued on while watching tire temp, but had no further problems. If it had not, warned me, I would likely have experienced a catastrophic tire failure.

My current TPMS allows me to monitor either pressure or temp. It defaults to pressure, but I usually switch over to temp once both sensors have registered. The light will warn me if pressure drops.
I concur about temperature rising, for some "unknown" reason. I had the same thing happen with mine with a hastily loaded trailer. Didn't take long to correct. I have also changed the batteries on several senders. I use only the BR1632 series Panasonic, as they are rated much higher tremperature (same as oem) than the commonly available CR series. I found them on Ebay from a place in Utah. I don't see how the Cr can last for long on the rear. Luckily, I have about 2 more sets of sensors, and one more receiver. Figured that someday, I may not be able to get them. Good tip on truck sensors. I see where ST has dropped, mc, auto, and rv lines. Sucks, since Bendix bought them out.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
I think that Smartire was the best TPMS system made for a motorcycle. I didn't particularly like the way the sensors mounted, but the functionality of the unit more than made up for it.

My last Smartire burned up with when my house and garage went up in smoke, but if I did still have it, I would look into replacing the battery.
I know the sensors are not intended to be serviced, but neither are the Honda sensors, and FredH has been changing batteries in them. What do you have to lose in trying?
I agree... I have not yet found anything that matches the Smartire performance. The mounting of the sensor is definitely the weakest part of the system.

I may give some thought to changing the battery. Has anyone attempted changing batteries on a Smartire sensor? It seems like it would alter the pressure calibration.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Monitoring tire temperature can tell you more than just watching pressure.
Pressure and temperature rise and fall in proportion with one another, but other things can cause a tire to get hot.
In 2010, on my way to Chattanooga, my Smartire TPMS went off because my rear tire was getting hot. I watched the temperature on the display and saw that it was steadily climbing, so I pulled off to check it out.
My load had shifted forward in my trailer. I reloaded and continued on while watching tire temp, but had no further problems. If it had not, warned me, I would likely have experienced a catastrophic tire failure.

My current TPMS allows me to monitor either pressure or temp. It defaults to pressure, but I usually switch over to temp once both sensors have registered. The light will warn me if pressure drops.
I agree completely on the tire temperature being a nice feature although I think I could probably now estimate temperature after watching the pressure temperature movements on my tires over the years I have used Smartire. In my estimation the sensor has to be inside the tire to accurately measure temperature. I have also been surprised at how much temperature variance there is from tire to tire. I currently have an older style rear Dunlop e3 I had to purchase on a trip to Colorado when I had a large cut in the tire. It is running hotter than the Avon it replaced. I don't really have any great basis for my decision but I tend to consider 190 about my maximum comfort level. Returning from Colorado last fall the tire was hovering at 190 most of the time. Slowing down a bit make a big difference. The Avon would probably be 20-30 degrees cooler under the same conditions and I would have maintained my normal pace.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
I concur about temperature rising, for some "unknown" reason. I had the same thing happen with mine with a hastily loaded trailer. Didn't take long to correct. I have also changed the batteries on several senders. I use only the BR1632 series Panasonic, as they are rated much higher tremperature (same as oem) than the commonly available CR series. I found them on Ebay from a place in Utah. I don't see how the Cr can last for long on the rear. Luckily, I have about 2 more sets of sensors, and one more receiver. Figured that someday, I may not be able to get them. Good tip on truck sensors. I see where ST has dropped, mc, auto, and rv lines. Sucks, since Bendix bought them out.
Thanks for the photo of the sensor without the cover. I may just give that a try to replace the batteries before I give up on this system.
 

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For anyone so inclined to do the battery change. Does take some patience, and good soldering skills.


3 years later, I'm happy to report that sensors are still working fine. 3-31-14


I made use of a good digital caliper, then found the exact center of sender body. Then, I set that point on knife edge, and determined the heavy end. (not by much) That is the battery end I deduced, and-----I presumed correctly. At least twice that worked out. Then I used a small scraper device, like a Sizzler meat tenderness stick, sharpened a bit, and started scraping the sealant off bottom. NO METAL SCRAPERS HERE !! Got that all off, and removed the 2 screws at center. Then on heavy end, I drilled a 3/16 hole under the label (pull the label off carefully and save). Don't let that bit go thru anything but the thickness of shell plastic). A spacer on drill bit (copper tube?), to leave only 1/8" or so exposed, is a really good idea, or a drill press with a depth adjustment. Then, I used a drill bit with flattened end (anything like a dowel) and pushed thru hole very, very slowly but gradually increasing pressure, and the module starts to come out of inside sealant. Keep pushing firmly, but slowly.

Don't get in a hurry here. Oh, btw, if the "pusher" goes into the hole more than an 1/8 inch or more, we have the wrong end drilled !!) The idea is to push on the battery's.

Did I say - Push very, very slowly?

Now, the module is staring you in the face. So, take a couple macro type pictures to determine the battery installation. And after taking pictures, start cleaning the clear tough-ish sealer from around the cell straps right where they are soldered to the board. Then, I used a solder sucker (radio Shack) to de-solder the battery tabs.

Bear in mind as you're doing this battery job, there's 2 cells, 3v. each, but, they're in parallel. So, the end result is 3V. Do some studying on how they installed these, and take the replacement cells and solder their tabs to the tabs of old cells. Will take some measuring and snipping here. The cells I acquired had tabs that are too short. You can see where I soldered them in one of the previous shots, with about 3/16 over lap. Once these are installed, it's important to determine that the cells will rest on the bottom of well. No gap allowed. Calipers are handy here, just don't accidentally short the battery's with the caliper. Then reseal the solder joints with some sensor safe silicone.

ADDED ....IMPORTANT! - we need an insulator between cells, and if I remember correctly, I used the originals.

Put a drop of Silicone sealer on top ob battery, and then set the module back into housing, install the screws, and reseal the bottom, and the drilled hole with some gray sensor safe silicone. Then let set for a couple days. The drop of silicone in battery well is to ensure battery is totally supported to resist forces of centrifigul force, hence, it's important to let silicone cure for several days. Then, I test them by mounting on trailer wheel, install tire, pump to 35 psi, and spinning with drill chuck against tire, on a balancer. Or whatever method is handy. Of course, one has to have a powered up monitor, and set into program mode, or one could do that spinning next to bike with it's monitor on, and in pgm. mode. Works a treat.

If one if confident of his job, just install, and go. Using a multi-meter to confirm polarity isn't a bad idea, either. It takes longer to tell it, than to actually do it. This fix may not be worth the trouble for some, but I like the ST so much, I deemed the procedure worth it. But then, I'm a tinkerer by nature.

Search EBay for Panasonic BR1632 battery.. Not CR!! CR would probably be ok for front, tho. Be sure to get the battery with the tabs, or maybe Local battery place can weld tabs on. You'll have to possibly trim battery tab ends to fit into slots before soldering. Bend them over, too, for stronger solder joint. I cut them off with Dremel with small abrasive cut-off wheel.
 

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