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Discussion Starter #1
I was just wondering how does one make the 3 pistons retract? I have the front done and now the rear is a bear. I think the pistons are only on one side. I can get a new pad on one side and the old on the other. But I can not get both new pads in. I have tried my hand/finger strength, but it is not quite what it use to be. I am not sure about prying on the rotor as I do not want to warp or mess them up. So how do you make them pistons retract?
 

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Have not changed pads on a GL yet, but on automobiles, I use a "C" clamp using the old pad as a surface against the "C" clamp. The caliper has to be off of its mounts.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
I am trying not to remove the wheel or caliper. I did the front without doing so. I was expecting side out old. Then compress pistons and install new. I do not think a c clamp would fit even if I removed the wheel.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
I did manage after repeated and repeated tries to get the pads in. After a test drive around the block with some stop and goes, my rotors are hot. So I guess they should be as they are breaking in the new pads. But I still wonder how does everyone change brakes, without removing wheel, and compress/retract the rotors?
 

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It's probably a good idea to remove @ least the front(left) caliper. There are a couple of pivot points and a small needle bearing that requires occasional lubrication.
 

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I never thought of changing the pads with out removing the caliper. I do know that if I use wd40 and a tooth brush to clean around the pistons that they will slid back in with almost no effort. Recommend that you use your wife's toothbrush.
 

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I agree with ponton and just remove the caliper. Caliper should always be removed anyway so that you can get to the pistons and give them good cleaning with brake cleaner and tooth brush. If you push in dirty pistons this will lead to premature caliper seal leaking and piston sticking. You also can get better look at the small metal clips that are easy to install incorrectly.
 

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I use a pair of channel lock pliers, thin wood shims and the old brake pad. The wood shims prevent the pliers from scratching the caliper and the old pad pushes the pistons into the caliper. This is all done without removing the calipers. It takes about 3 squeezes alternating between the top and bottom of the caliper to fully seat the pistons. Remember to squeeze slowly and steadily.
 

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When I changed my pads I changed the fluid also. Since I was going to bleed the system, I just opened the bleeder valves. They push in fairly easy that way.
 

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I push back and forth until I get a little slack. It'll back 'em out enough to slide the old ones out, then I get in there and press the cups in enough for the new pads.

Note that when you back one out, you are pressing all the others in that are "Linked", AND are also pushing brake fluid back into the resevior - take care not to squeeze with those channel locks too much or you might push fluid out of the resevior.

If you take one of the calipers off the rotor, you are just letting those cups 'pooch' out when you press the others in. You push 'em out to far and the cup WILL pop out! :shock:
 
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