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Discussion Starter #1
Replacing throttle cables ('02 model)

I wouldn’t classify this as a step-by-step, but rather an enlightenment and tips/tricks narrative on replacing your throttle cables. This sub-forum seemed to be the most appropriate place to put this, though.

Due to the length of this, I have to post it in 2 parts.
Please read it all and understand it before attempting to do this. I take no responsibility or liability if you follow this procedure. It is just what worked for me.

Specialty tools required:

  • 5mm ball-end hex wrench
  • Cable lube kit
Parts required:

  • Service manual
  • Throttle cables A, B and C (’02 model)
Parts optional:

  • Throttle body rubber gasket (not required, but recommended)
  • Air cleaner element (Not required, but you’ll be right there)
  • High beam bulbs (If you opt to remove the front fairing, excellent chance to easily replace those normally difficult-to-reach bulbs (H7 type)
Time of repair:

  • Difficult to judge, but I would say between 8 – 15 hours.
Difficulty of repair:

  • (Scale of 1 – 10), I would put it at 7 for technical, and 8 for testing your patience
  • Cussword usage rating = 9
Reference link:
http://gl1800riders.com/forums/showthread.php?t=204395

Photo and procedure credits:

  • Snowman, Brian Fenner, RePete
  • Documented by Snowman (Jeff)
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* First, the issues that contributed to having to replace the cables *
*****************************************************
Having to replace throttle cables (not fun!) because one of mine snapped inside the handlebar switch, and another because the plastic coating “snapped” just above the major adjuster.

In this photo, you can see how the old cable’s plastic coating separated and bent at almost a 90 degree angle.



After I installed the 3 new throttle cables and routed them the same way as they originally were, I could see what was causing the stress on the cables. Ideally, I think the cables should lay close to the frame as seen in this photo:



The issue comes from making hard left and right turns. The fork tubes press against the cables and pull the excess cable in whatever direction you are turning. Then, when you turn hard in the opposite direction, particularly to the left… this photo shows what is happening:



I am still pondering the solution, but am leaning towards a ziptie very near the major adjuster to keep it close to the frame.

Here are some photos showing the routing.

Coming out of the cruise cancel switch area and behind the left fork



Behind a mass of wires before going into the cable clamp shown in the next photo



Through the clamp, which I think is part of the problem. There should be more freeplay through this clamp to allow the cable to “float”. Instead, the clamp helps tug the cable back and forth as your turn.



************************************
* Now, onto tips for replacing the cables *
************************************

If you are prepared to dig this deep into your bike, and you are comfortable doing so, then read on. If you are not, then consider having a qualified repair shop do the replacement.



As I mentioned at the beginning, this is not step-by-step, but more of highlights and tips presentation. This assumes you know how to do some basic component removal and replacement that will not be covered here.

What must be removed:

  • Seat
  • Battery
  • Gas Tank
  • Top Shelter
  • Meter panel
  • Air cleaner housing
  • Cruise cancel switch
  • Throttle cables
Optional removal to make the process easier:

  • Dash visor panel
  • Mirrors
  • Windshield
  • Front fairing
  • Inner fairing
And if you really like dissecting your bike:

  • Left side radiator
To expound on the above, Brian Fenner has done this process with removing only the bare essentials. I did it by removing the optional components, except for the radiator. RePete did it by removing all the above.

There are three separate cables that comprise the throttle system. If you are doing one cable, you may as well do all three. These are listed as Cable A, Cable B and Cable C. All three combined will run you somewhere in the $50-$60 range. Also consider purchasing the rubber gasket that goes between the air cleaner housing and the throttle body. I didn’t do that and had to spend 20 minutes cleaning old gas varnish off the gasket to reuse it.

Throttle body gasket:



You will also need to have a set of metric ball-end hex wrenches. The ball-end will give you some flexibility on angle when you get to removing the cruise cancel switch. Off-hand I believe it is the 5mm hex wrench. (the longer the better)

Tip 1: When you start removing components use your service manual, grab a tablet and write down what you are removing and keep it in order. Then reverse the list when re-assembling. You are removing quite a bit on this procedure.

Tip 2: Although they are brand new cables, lube them with a cable lube kit! I failed to do that before I installed them and had to undo them at the handlebar switch , lube them and hook them up a second time. I expected them to work fine without lube, but when I turned the throttle and let go, the return was pretty sluggish. After lubing them there was 100% improvement on the return. Brian lubed his and let them hang overnight for the excess to run out. Good idea.

Tip 3: Keep your digital camera handy and take some high-res photos of areas that get a bit complicated. A good example for this was my battery connections. I snapped a photo of the wiring as seen below. Since I had to remove the battery, the battery case and the gas tank, you can bet all those wires got shuffled around quite a bit. Easily replaced by referring to the photo.




So, remove all the components to get down to the throttle body. Possible “gotcha” is the 4 Phillips head screws you have to remove for the air cleaner housing air tunnels. I stripped the heads on every one of them. Cheap screws + old gas turned-to-varnish = buzzkill. Use the correct size screwdriver and insert squarely into them.



With the air cleaner housing removed, place paper towels or a rag over the air intakes of the throttle body. You now have access to the cables that come to the throttle body drum and the cruise cancel switch. One cable goes directly to the drum. Two other cables interact inside the cruise cancel switch and then one goes to the drum.

Disconnect the two cables that attach at the throttle body drum. Just unscrew the adjuster-type screw far enough to slide the cable out of the side of the cable stays. Also shown in the photo is the cruise cancel switch. That is where the challenge and patience begin.



CONTINUED IN PART II of “Replacing Throttle cables ’02 model”
 

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Discussion Starter #2
Replacing throttle cables ('02 model) Part II

Continued from Part I

At this point, I replaced the cable that went to the lower cable stay and followed the routing of the old cable. I didn’t tie it in to the handlebar switch yet, HOWEVER, you may want to go the reverse way of how I did it here. That top cable has to be screwed into the handlebar switch housing. Meaning - attach it to the handlebar switch BEFORE you attach it to the throttle body drum. If you opt to do it the way I did (drum first), you have to completely unscrew the minor cable adjuster (near the handlebar switch) in order to spin the threaded metal portion of the cable guide into the switch housing. Room is a little tight, but it can be done.

The next part is to remove the cruise cancel switch by removing the two 5mm hex bolts. The lower (bottom) bolt is easily accessible. The top bolt is partially hidden under the frame. Before you start removing these bolts, stuff some rags under them to catch them if they drop. I dropped one into the abyss, which cost me a trip to the Honda shop.

First I removed the lower hex bolt. Next, you have to force the cruise cancel switch to the outside of the bike in order to access the bolt with the ball-end of your hex wrench.
I jammed a screwdriver up against the cruise cancel switch and wedged the other end against the opposite side frame to push the unit out:



Here is a better photo of the cruise cancel switch:



Here is the pic with the wrench in the bolt and I have already gotten about 2 turns on it. It IS imperative to have the ball-end type wrench! I never removed the bolt from the hole, just left it there for re-assembly after I attached the new cables.



Once those 2 bolts are free, I pulled the cruise cancel switch to the inside of the bike as seen below. RePete had a problem bringing his to the inside of the bike and chose to remove his left-side radiator to bring it to the outside. (Requires draining your cooling system). Be advised that if you pull it to the inside, as seen below, that is about as far as you can go because of the electrical wire connected to the bottom of the cancel switch. I did the two cable replacements with the cancel switch right where you see it below.



Remove the Phillips head screw that holds the cover on the cruise cancel switch and there are the two cables that interact inside. Make note of the position of the plastic housing to keep it oriented when installing the new cables. You should have a black mark on the housing. Just use that as reference. Remove and replace one cable at a time so as not to mix them up. The red arrow points to a little rubber seal that you will need to remove to get the cable out of the cancel switch. Put the new cable partially in place and then put that rubber seal back in. It’s a bugger. It does remove by pulling it straight out of the top of the cancel switch and reverse the procedure to reinstall it. Replace the two cables inside the cruise cancel switch and button it back up.



Quick recap – at this point you have tied in the new cable that goes to the lower cable stay at the throttle body drum and routed it to the handlebar switch. You have replaced the two cables inside the cruise cancel switch. Do not yet attach the shortest cable back to the throttle body drum. You have to first put the cruise cancel switch back into place.

Do this by wrestling it back into position. It helps to force some of that wiring bundle out of your way. You’ll know which one. Line up the lower (easy access) hole and start the bolt enough to hold it in place but still allow freedom of movement. Now it is back to using the wedged-in screwdriver to push the unit out enough to access the bolt that hides under the frame. I did it a little differently this time as the screwdriver tended to slip at the handle side. I used my hammer holster to help stop slippage and also ziptied the handle in place in order to keep enough pressure on the unit.



That gave me the clearance I needed to get to the bolt using my trusty ball-end hex wrench, but I had a tough time getting the bolt upright and lined up to the hole. Enter the magnetic parts retriever. You can see how I used it here to pull the bolt to the correct angle and hold it there while being able to spin it down.





Once you have the cruise cancel switch securely in place, connect the last (shortest) throttle cable to the throttle body drum. Follow the routing of your old cables, remove the old cables from the handlebar switch and attach the new ones. While all cables are disconnected from the handlebar switch, slide the grip off and put a light application of lubricating oil onto the handlebar, under the throttle grip. I am not covering the handlebar switch as it is pretty straightforward. You probably want to set the adjustment of the top cable all the way in to give you maximum play for enough slack to attach the cable ends.

When the cables are all attached, test the throttle and see that it has a crisp “snap-back”. If it is real sluggish, did you remember to lube the cables? Double check your routing and make sure nothing is binding the cables. Finally, make sure all cable connections are tightened to spec, properly adjusted to take the slack out and the adjuster nuts are tightened.

Button the bike back up! (You DID take notes as I suggested so you can simply reverse the order by looking at the tablet, right?) ;)

A tip for replacing the air cleaner housing onto that short drain hose that goes into the bottom left of the housing:

(Don't forget to put the throttle body gasket in place if you removed it.)

First, be sure to turn the clamp on the yellowish hose so it is facing the front of the bike. Now, connect the longer hose that goes to the right underside of the air box. That hose still gives you maneuvering room when it is connected. Now, use something with some length, a small screwdriver, allen wrench, nail punch, etc and stick it through the hole of the airbox housing and guide the housing down with your tool going into the opening of the hose. I used an allen wrench as seen here.



and from the front of the bike, behind the front fender you can see the end of the allen wrench inside the hose. It keeps it somewhat lined up and allows you jostle it into place.



Next, replace one of the air tunnels to hold the airbox in place so you can exert some force against it. There was no way I could get my hands in the opening to push the hose on. A pair of long needle nose pliers did the job nicely. You have to (obviously) come in from behind the front wheel fender. You can easily push the hose all the way up, followed by the clamp.

Put the rest of the bike back together.
 

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What must be removed:
. . . .
Optional removal to make the process easier:
. . .
But the best part:
And if you really like dissecting your bike:

  • Left side radiator
If you really like dissecting your bike. I like that. Now don't be shy and tell us how much extra (time, tools and talents) it is for a rad R&R.

I replaced my reverse motor last summer so spent some time looking and cleaning the throttle cables and housing. I did the cable lube thing but was not satisfied with the results. So I took off the throttle grip. After some steel wool cleaning it now snaps back. (PS even better than a brand new bike at a dealers!)
 

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The "Phillips" screws on this bike have heads cut to a different spec than typical USA Phillips. Japanese standard drivers are available, but USA drivers can often be plunted some to fit better. It helps to tap them in before applying any torque -- very easy to strip for sure.

Snowman; this definitely looks like one of those jobs one hopes to never do.

prs
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Update -

So my solution was to put a ziptie in place to keep the throttle cables close to the frame. I believe that there is an OEM cable stay that goes there, however, mine was missing. I have seen pics of it and it appears to be a very cheap and easily lost cable stay.

Anyway, here is a pic I snapped this morning. Ziptie is working nicely. I didn't tighten it all the way so there is room for a bit of play to allow the cables some "float". It is ziptied to a hard-line that runs up against the frame. There is very little pull from the ziptie on the hard-line, so I am confident there are no issues in doing it this way.

 

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Nice write up, good job!

FYI, on my 2009 model, there is a clamp around the cables in the location where you suggested adding a zip tie to keep them close to the frame. I don't know what year it was added, but it is a small plastic clamp that goes over the cables and a hard brake line and holds them closer to the frame.

I also have struggled with reconnecting the drain hose on the bottom of the airbox. My method was to pull on the hose at that top end and get enough slack in it that I could lift the airbox up and tilt it enough to get my hand under it and reattach the hose by feel from reaching in from the top, down under the bottom side of the airbox. In retrospect, I wonder if it might be easier to just pull the hose all the way out, hook it onto the bottom of the airbox, and then re-thread the hose back down through the bike.
 

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Here is a photo of the clamp on my 2009 bike. You can't see in the photo, but there is a hard brake line behind it that it also goes around, and the hard line acts to hold the clip and cables close to the frame.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Nice write up, good job!

I also have struggled with reconnecting the drain hose on the bottom of the airbox. My method was to pull on the hose at that top end and get enough slack in it that I could lift the airbox up and tilt it enough to get my hand under it and reattach the hose by feel from reaching in from the top, down under the bottom side of the airbox. In retrospect, I wonder if it might be easier to just pull the hose all the way out, hook it onto the bottom of the airbox, and then re-thread the hose back down through the bike.
Thanks Fred.

Attaching that drain hose is actually pretty easy if you try it the way I showed. Just drop an allen wrench (or slim screwdriver) into the drain hole to act as a guide for the hose, then use a pair of long handled needle nose (or other smaller type) pliers and you can easily snug that hose all the way up.

Jeff
 

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Thank you for the thorough report. After reading this I got the courage to do it myself. I learned a few things. One is that the shoulder screws that hold the airbox to the throttle body are TIGHT and I stripped one out. After drilling then easy out I found that Rocky Mountain ATV & Motorcycle had them in stock. Ordered on Sunday, arrived on Thursday. Also, if only replacing the pull cable, you don't need to pull the radiator. I also had just filled the tank, so siphoning the gas out was easiest by removing the fuel sensor cover. PG Blaster Penetrating oil was my friend. This took over a week due to ordering the parts. I was running out of time so I put her back together for a ride. The next Saturday I pulled it down again to replace the rear spring and the rubber adjuster hose withe a Progressive spring and a reinforced hose. Total time was about 5 hours the second time around. After you do it once, it is not that daunting of a task.

Thank you for keeping these old posts around!
 

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Looks like the pictures have gone away which is a real shame.

Anybody know what part is the Throttle body gasket? I would like to order it before I start tear down but not sure what part or part number that is.
 
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