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Discussion Starter #1
O.K. I have ridden a couple of time this year, and the wing is gulping down the fuel.

I was at a friends house tonight and when I fired up to leave you could really smell it running "rich". I sat there and we talked a few minutes and the "rich" smell was still there.

I rode home and it seems to run fine, but the fuel gauge it moving way too fast.

I read that the ECM would reset if I fired it up cold and don't touch the throttle until the fans kick on. It's a 2001 and has had the ECM recall done in 2002.

I think the recall was to "richen" it up to reduce the chances of overheating.

Anybody had any experience with this ??????????????
 

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My understanding of the system is that resetting the ECM really only affects the operation of the Idle Air Control valve.

If your bike is really running rich, I would pull the plugs and confirm it. If they indicate it is running rich, I would check the air filter (mouse nest?) and put a fuel gauge on the fuel rail to check the operation of the fuel pressure regulator.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Thanks Fred.
I'm sure it not mice. I just put an air cleaner and plugs about a month ago, and it's stored in a heated and very well sealed garage.
I had the battery disconnected for a couple of weeks during winter maintenance and I thought that maybe the Ecm had a "default" setting that it reverted to.
The sun will come out soon and I give it a long, fast ride and see what happens then.
 

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Also, check for a fuel leak if it 'smells like gas'. If it is truly running rich I would think it would soon set an FI code.

The only other thing I can think of is a bad O2 sensor.
 

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Also, check for a fuel leak if it 'smells like gas'. If it is truly running rich I would think it would soon set an FI code.

The only other thing I can think of is a bad O2 sensor.
:agree:

The O2 sensors (actually they are O2 switches) operate in a narrow band between 14.1 and 15.1 AFR. As they age their effective bandwidth narrows to the point where the system can have difficulty going into closed loop mode.

The bike operates in open loop at many points such as rapid acceleration, wide open throttle and closed throttle deceleration. When the sensor's range drops below where the computer can sense a stable reading it goes into an open loop mode at all points in the map. This default open loop setting is typically quite rich, usually in the 12.7 - 13.1 range.

So, with an 8 year old bike it's highly likely one or more of the sensors have gone out of range and need to be replaced. The dealer's computer should be able to run a test and identify the faulty sensor/s.

BTW, this typically will not throw a code since open loop operation is part of "normal" operation, especially in an '01 bike. Newer bikes, especially from 2010 on will probably throw codes when it can't go closed loop at idle since this is now part of the EPA certification criteria.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Well that was my thought. 80,000 miles , it's about time to service the emission system.

Honda has a service kit that includes both O2 sensors for $167. That's not bad and will eliminate one of the causes.

I assume that all that would be left is the fuel pressure regulator, and that can be easily checked with a gauge.
 
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