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This thread is inspired by Yellow Wolf's topic on sharing the road with trucks. My question concerns his point #3

"3-a tire about to go will most times make a loud humming sound just before it lets go"

Is this true with re-tread / re-capped tires, too?

Also, I notice a lot more rubber pieces on the roads in the south than up north -- is that due to heat causing the tires to fail more or that more trucks in the south run retread tires?

Do retreads generally fail because they are not manufactured correctly? Or is that the nature of the beast?

When a retread starts to separate, do they do so slowly, in pieces or usually all at once, quickly?
 

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This thread is inspired by Yellow Wolf's topic on sharing the road with trucks. My question concerns his point #3

"3-a tire about to go will most times make a loud humming sound just before it lets go"

Is this true with re-tread / re-capped tires, too?

Also, I notice a lot more rubber pieces on the roads in the south than up north -- is that due to heat causing the tires to fail more or that more trucks in the south run retread tires?

Do retreads generally fail because they are not manufactured correctly? Or is that the nature of the beast?

When a retread starts to separate, do they do so slowly, in pieces or usually all at once, quickly?

Don't know about the noise aspect. But the number one enemy of a retreaded tire is HEAT. If you don't keep the tire pressure up, you will get heat build up. Too much heat, the glue softens up. Then you get the peeling process started. Also high speeds and over loading will heat up the tire. Add in lower than proper pressure, and peeling starts. There are two types of retreads; full cap; and glue on caps. Most use the glue on "Bandag" type caps because of cost. The full on recap gets virgin rubber remolded onto the tire in a tire mold at high heat. Cost is higher, but it looks just like a new tire. I always specified full caps when I was purchasing recaps. And we never had a failure. I worked for a local town and our tires took a beating. As for who gets more failures, north or south. I would guess the south due to higher air temps, and hotter road surfaces. :coffee1: Tom :doorag:
 

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BEWARE! Flying Tire treads may be hazardous to your health. STAY AWAY FROM SEMI"S. Especially Tankers. Gas trucks make me really nervous. I saw one hit the wall. It pined some cars up against the center divide and exploded. Everything was burning . You could see the people freaking out in the burning cars and nobody could do a f!*king thing to save em. He had swerved to avoid a flying tire tread from another truck.
 

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A big problem with recapped tires are the ones that truckers are sometimed forced to purchase at truck stops on the road. It is best that a tire casing (tire needing to be capped) is only recapped no more than once or twice in its life. Unfortunately at truck stops you often get a tire casing that has been capped many, many times. The truck stop can purchase these really cheap because fleets normally wont run them on the tractor or the trailers. But you guessed it..they dont sell them cheap to the driver or company that has an emergency and needs a tire now! There are some companies that run these multiple capped tires on their trailers since there is less force in a trailing non-drive tire (except in braking). Of course recaps are against the law on the steer tires. As mentioned earlier, too much heat destroys recaps, this is multiplied by poor casings that were capped too many times and also by running the tires will too little air pressure.
 

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Loss of a steering axle tire will cause a truck to usually move over at least one lane before you can catch it...providing you have power steering. Old days trucks without power steering would take up two or more lanes. Sometimes you can feel that a tire is gonna go by the vibration transmitted up through the drivers seat.
 

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Having been in and around law enforcement for a million years, I can tell you that a truck recap going can be extremely dangerous! There have been some deaths attributed to them going awry! Yep, here in the south, heat seems to play a big factor.

GUYS... PLEASE DON'T RIDE BESIDE AN 18 WHEELER... PASS HIM AND GET AROUND and away from him AS FAST AS POSSIBLE. I have seen and worked accidents where the blown top cap went through a windshield of a cage and decapitated one occupant and almost decapitated the driver... needless to say - NO one lived!

When I pass one, I move as far to the left as possible so as to give me as much viewing advantage as possible and start my acceleration well before I start the passing maneuver and achieve my pasing speed well before starting around!
 

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A big problem with recapped tires are the ones that truckers are sometimed forced to purchase at truck stops on the road. It is best that a tire casing (tire needing to be capped) is only recapped no more than once or twice in its life. Unfortunately at truck stops you often get a tire casing that has been capped many, many times. The truck stop can purchase these really cheap because fleets normally wont run them on the tractor or the trailers. But you guessed it..they dont sell them cheap to the driver or company that has an emergency and needs a tire now! There are some companies that run these multiple capped tires on their trailers since there is less force in a trailing non-drive tire (except in braking). Of course recaps are against the law on the steer tires. As mentioned earlier, too much heat destroys recaps, this is multiplied by poor casings that were capped too many times and also by running the tires will too little air pressure.
:agree:yup lots of folks that buy recaps simply are not educated about recaps, if u start with a good quallity tire the end results are pretty good, if u start with junk thats what u get
 

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Loss of a steering axle tire will cause a truck to usually move over at least one lane before you can catch it...providing you have power steering. Old days trucks without power steering would take up two or more lanes. Sometimes you can feel that a tire is gonna go by the vibration transmitted up through the drivers seat.
thats what lots of folks claim but i have to say i had a front tire blow on a loaded truck without power steering and had absolutley no problem pulling safely to the side of the road and stopping
 

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Mythbusters did a segment on exploding recaps.
I hope this link works.

http://tubeplus.me/player/1168226/MythBusters/season_5/episode_11/Big_Rig_Myths/%22

If not its season 5 episode 11 "Big Rig Myths"


Rather interesting :eek:4:
I did not take the time to watch this yet, but the one that I saw they were simulating a blowout on a tire. Some had thought the explosion of air would cause damage to the bike or rider, it did not. That is a lot different than a recap coming off a truck tire. The cap coming off is a deathly or near deathly event for a motorcycle.
 

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I believe it is illegal (Feds) to run recaps on the steer tires. Other than that, many companies run them on the drive tires, but most large companies don't. Almost ALL run retreads on the trailers however. The big problem is that most truckers don't check air pressure in trailer tires. Just hook up and go. Maybe give it a whack, but actually getting down and checking pressure...uh uh. And as the low tire heats up, it finally reaches the point where it will separate. I only lost two tires. One was making a slapping noise right before it went and the other had a big chunk of steel embedded in it. The hot weather and hot asphalt just add to the problem. The explosion itself is not the problem...the shrapnel in the form of rubber and wires, or the whole tire casing coming off IS. Recapped tires properly inflated will "usually" run their life. The company I drove for would not even repair a tractor tire. And if you told them you had a tire on the tractor that wouldn't hold air, they would just scrap it out rather than attempt a repair. The best thing is dont get up behind 'em, and don't ride beside 'em. Independents are well known for taking shortcuts to save a buck, and now with fuel higher than heck, it is probably more so.
 

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WAS FOLLOWING IN CAGE LATE AT NITE AND SEEN SPARKS FOR 2 SECONDS A WHAM TOOK OUT BOTH LEFT SIDE HEADLITES PUSHED IN BUMBER N PUT REAL BIG DENT IN FENDER - WAS BIG OLD BUICK WAGON WE WERE DOING 100 MPH HE STOPPED N PAID ME 100 FOR DAMAGES :thumbup: IF ON MY WING WOULD 'VE BEEN SCRAPPING ME OFF 95 LOT OF TIMES YOU CAN HEAR TIRE THUMPING BEFORE IT COMES APART EITHER WAY NOT A GOOD THING
 

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Doesn't necessarily have to be a Recap Hot weather can cause alot of blowouts, that is a big reason for all the rubber on the road here in the south. Also they can and will blow WITHOUT warning. 3.5 million miles and had my share of both recaps and new tires blow. As all have said pass FAST.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Harry --

Thanks for the link to the video. I've always been worried about the blast from a truck tire as I was passing. Good to know that's nearly the risk I thought -- but am in no hurry to test it out on the highway! I'll still twist the throttle as I pass a truck.

I've never deliberately followed behind trucks but now that I've seen what a tire coming apart looks like and can do, I'm really going to avoid being behind a truck, which is tough to do in NW Indiana!

Since underinflation is a key culprit of tire failure, I'm sort of surprised it's not mandatory to regularly check TP of trailers.

Thanks everyone for the feedback and insights on this potentially catastrophic issue.
 
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