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On my 2010 1800 the yellow reverse light will light up but when I release the button it goes back to the green natural button. If hold the button in the reverse will work and back the bike up. Would a bad fuse cause this? I haven’t had the bike out to see if cruse control works. Would appreciate suggestions on what to check.
 

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Lubricate your button. Once pushed it should stay in w/reverse engaged. It should remain that way until you push it again and release the switch and disengage reverse.

The switch itself should operate just like the cruise control switch.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Lubricate your button. Once pushed it should stay in w/reverse engaged. It should remain that way until you push it again and release the switch and disengage reverse.

The switch itself should operate just like the cruise control switch.
I tried that yesterday, I will try again and make sure I get the electrical cleaner in for a good soaking.

Thank for your post.
 

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If you are getting reverse then the switch is functional along with the associated fuses and wiring .... it sounds like the detent is not holding. May be as simple as an external clean/lube. Just be carful if you have to go deeper and remove the control, there are small springs inside for the detent. B.
 

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On my 2010 1800 the yellow reverse light will light up but when I release the button it goes back to the green natural button. If hold the button in the reverse will work and back the bike up. Would a bad fuse cause this? I haven’t had the bike out to see if cruse control works. Would appreciate suggestions on what to check.
You need to lube/clean out the old grease in the assembly. The only way to get the cleaner into the correct place is to remove the two screws from the bottom that hold the control pod together and drop the bottom half down so you can spray the cleaner directly into the switch assembly. If you don’t get it clean enough, it could latch in the reverse position and refuse to unlatch. This will have you stuck in reverse with no way to get it out and if you kill the engine, you won’t be able to start it again. It’s paramount to keep this switch latching in and out properly.
 

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On my 2010 1800 the yellow reverse light will light up but when I release the button it goes back to the green natural button. If hold the button in the reverse will work and back the bike up. Would a bad fuse cause this? I haven’t had the bike out to see if cruse control works. Would appreciate suggestions on what to check.
To clean and lubricate, the switch assembly will need separated. Once that occurs, the reverse switch needs removed and disassemble to properly clean it and lube it. However, you should know that the correct way to repair any of the switches in those switch assemblies is to replace the entire assembly.

Part #2 in the fishe below.

https://www.mrcycles.com/oemparts/a/hon/5053edc9f870021c54be4f29/handle-switch-2
 

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To clean and lubricate, the switch assembly will need separated. Once that occurs, the reverse switch needs removed and disassemble to properly clean it and lube it. However, you should know that the correct way to repair any of the switches in those switch assemblies is to replace the entire assembly.

Part #2 in the fishe below.

https://www.mrcycles.com/oemparts/a/hon/5053edc9f870021c54be4f29/handle-switch-2
Why replace an expensive switch assembly if a simple cleaning of the affected switch could properly restore it to like new working condition? Sometimes, thinking outside the box can garner the best results.
 

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Why replace an expensive switch assembly if a simple cleaning of the affected switch could properly restore it to like new working condition? Sometimes, thinking outside the box can garner the best results.
There is such a thing as a "standard of repair." Usually it's established by the manufacture in what they are willing to pay for if it were a warranty claim. Certainly the goal is to fix the complaint, but it also has everything to do with liability. In the OPs case, Honda would authorize the replacement of the Kill Switch assembly ... that then becomes the standard of repair.

There are actually more reasons to it than that. In a professional environment, suppose I quote the cost to open the switch assembly, remove, clean and lube the switch. When I go to put it back together, I discover that the spring is missing. Now the repair becomes my liability. Trying to save the customer "a buck" now costs me a switch assembly since the spring is not sold separately. When individual parts are not sold separately, the assembly is considered "non-serviceable."

Of coarse DIYr's can do anything they want. If they lose a spring, some will even go shopping for one at Office Depo. However, if someone needs any switch parts, I have plenty, and all they have to do is ask.

The only switch that is clean and lube here is the 4-way switch. It's also the only one that can be done with the entire switch panel in my lap. The switch next to it, a Fog lamp switch, is never cleaned and lubed because the cost of labor does not justify it. So that a customer is not delayed while waiting for parts, both fog lamps switches, and all 3 kill switch assemblies are kept in stock.
 
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