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Hey I was wondering if there are any gl1800 or goldwing riders in the Chicago area who have successfully been able to do all the exercises from the ride like a pro videos by Jerry Paladino. Would love to get some help. I already took the class that is offered in Indiana. Also if there is anyone in the Chicago area working on these techniques as well, would love to team up

Thanks!!



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I've practiced some of them!
 
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I took a safety course last year (although not in the Chicago area) I've been riding a motorcycle for 52 years and have ALWAYS had some sort of MC in my garage always... and I honestly thought what can they teach me??? Well I tell you that I walked out of that class, "thinking" holy poo poo" I just realize that I really learned alot, and that I wasn't at all as smart of a rider that I thought I was...I TELL YOU IF YOU HAVEN'T EVER TAKEN A SAFETY RIDING CLASS........i would highly recommend that you do....

Ronnie
 

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I took that course with the man himself a year before my GW purchase. I had a Yamaha venture which was extremely top heavy vs. wing. It’s a great course, well worth the time and money. Puts anyone’s inflated ego in check quick.
 

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Jazzer, if you haven't taken the MSF Experienced Rider Course, do so ASAP. Jerry's course is a big step above the Experienced Rider Course, the MSF course will prep you for the more advanced stuff.

Yes, a Wing is easily capable of everything in the Ride Like A Pro course. A wing is more capable than a Harley dresser. The limitation is the rider, not the bike.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
I took that course with the man himself a year before my GW purchase. I had a Yamaha venture which was extremely top heavy vs. wing. It’s a great course, well worth the time and money. Puts anyone’s inflated ego in check quick.


Wow you took it with Jerry? Nice! I took the ride like a pro class in Indiana which is franchised by Jerry. However it isn’t as comprehensive as the video and I left feeling like I still have a lot to work on.

I can do the slow cone weave, 12 feet apart finally. But now I’m stuck with the 24 foot circle. It’s really hard to lean the bike that far over enough to track all the way around the circle.

My biggest problem is that I can’t hold the clutch and throttle steady when I turn the handle bars from one direction to the other. I either let the throttle drop or raise the rpms. Have you had to work out this problem? Any suggestions.

I try to keep the rpms about 2000 for slow speed.


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Wow you took it with Jerry? Nice! I took the ride like a pro class in Indiana which is franchised by Jerry. However it isn’t as comprehensive as the video and I left feeling like I still have a lot to work on.

I can do the slow cone weave, 12 feet apart finally. But now I’m stuck with the 24 foot circle. It’s really hard to lean the bike that far over enough to track all the way around the circle.

My biggest problem is that I can’t hold the clutch and throttle steady when I turn the handle bars from one direction to the other. I either let the throttle drop or raise the rpms. Have you had to work out this problem? Any suggestions.

I try to keep the rpms about 2000 for slow speed.


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He lives here and I took it n the same county he used to ride for Pasco Florida. It was only 2 of us and was almost like a private lesson. Anyway, I struggled initially. He jumped on my bike to prove it was me mentally and not the bike. After that I loosened up and went for it. As suggested, use second gear at least to get the hang of it and do those same techniques all the time. Shortly after his course I had to make a U turn on a short narrow road w my wife on the back. I did it fine but was anxious as ****. You’ll do fine, just keep working on the techniques. If I can do it on a Yamaha venture and pass his course ( doing figure 8’s), anyone can do it
 

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Discussion Starter #9
He lives here and I took it n the same county he used to ride for Pasco Florida. It was only 2 of us and was almost like a private lesson. Anyway, I struggled initially. He jumped on my bike to prove it was me mentally and not the bike. After that I loosened up and went for it. As suggested, use second gear at least to get the hang of it and do those same techniques all the time. Shortly after his course I had to make a U turn on a short narrow road w my wife on the back. I did it fine but was anxious as ****. You’ll do fine, just keep working on the techniques. If I can do it on a Yamaha venture and pass his course ( doing figure 8’s), anyone can do it


Thanks a lot! Actually I just found a thread by DJ Fire. He talks about doing circles in 3rd gear around a parking lot to get comfortable dragging pegs. I just did that, and i started to feel like What it means to really lean the bike. I was able to do almost 10 circles in a row dragging the peg. Hoping to work my way up to being able to do this while in the friction zone.


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Like most skills it’s the practice time after learning the technique that builds confidence. A few minutes in a marked parking lot after every ride is all it takes.

Standard parking spaces are 9’ x 18’, four adjoining spaces gives a perfect 18’ x 36 box with an X in the middle.
 

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Like most skills it’s the practice time after learning the technique that builds confidence. A few minutes in a marked parking lot after every ride is all it takes.

Standard parking spaces are 9’ x 18’, four adjoining spaces gives a perfect 18’ x 36 box with an X in the middle.


Thanks knew the spaces were 9 feet wide, but never thought about the 4 spaces making the perfect box. That will serve as a great practice tool.

Btw the DJFire post has really changed my riding confidence in just a few days, in case anyone hasn’t seen that thread who is following this one.


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^ yes, that DJFire supplement/prep to RLAP is good.

There are lots of RLAP videos. They all pretty much have the same secret sauce (friction zone, rear brake, head turn) but perhaps one slight variation of an explanation or an exercise will resonate with you. Spend a little time on YouTube and you can see it repackaged a few times.

I've still got a ways to go, but for me the breakthroughs, roughly in sequence, were:

1. Don't worry so much about RPMs. I was too focused on the number and it was distracting, then too worried about over-revving and at risk of not having enough. Be sure to have plenty, and too much will be obvious.

2. Head turn. They talk about it plenty. The thing I needed to hear more was not just TURN the head, but DO NOT LOOK DOWN. Turn and KEEP EYES UP.

3. I need to lean a bit forward so that I can turn the bars all the way. When I was sitting back, my outside arm wasn't long enough to turn the bars all the way without releasing it. It was limiting my turns. When I lean forward (not crazy, just a bit, sort of a basic athletic sitting stance) then I go lock to lock.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
^ yes, that DJFire supplement/prep to RLAP is good.

There are lots of RLAP videos. They all pretty much have the same secret sauce (friction zone, rear brake, head turn) but perhaps one slight variation of an explanation or an exercise will resonate with you. Spend a little time on YouTube and you can see it repackaged a few times.

I've still got a ways to go, but for me the breakthroughs, roughly in sequence, were:

1. Don't worry so much about RPMs. I was too focused on the number and it was distracting, then too worried about over-revving and at risk of not having enough. Be sure to have plenty, and too much will be obvious.

2. Head turn. They talk about it plenty. The thing I needed to hear more was not just TURN the head, but DO NOT LOOK DOWN. Turn and KEEP EYES UP.

3. I need to lean a bit forward so that I can turn the bars all the way. When I was sitting back, my outside arm wasn't long enough to turn the bars all the way without releasing it. It was limiting my turns. When I lean forward (not crazy, just a bit, sort of a basic athletic sitting stance) then I go lock to lock.


What’s your advice for keeping a steady throttle through the slow cone weave? Turning the bars often causes me to move the throttle or clutch. I think that’s one thing that holds me back a great deal from being fully confident. I’ll be half way through the weave and I hear my rpms drop. And I quickly rev them up. I still make it through the weave ok, but not as smooth as in the video

Thanks!





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Jazzer, two things may help.
One, I keep my right thumb on the start button cover. That gives a fixed reference and helps keep my hand stationary.

Two, if that doesn't work, try rhythmically flipping the throttle. You'll see Jerry doing that all the time. That also helps keep you in the friction zone if you tend to get lazy with the clutch. If the bike starts lurching from the blips, you have too much clutch engaged.
 

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If you're in the friction zone, when push comes to shove, what matters is having enough RPMs, not how steady they are. Jerry does a demo where you rev and it doesn't matter. Try it. Not that you should do it (jerky throttle movements), but you can.

You should be more worried about having a steady hand on the clutch in the friction zone than you are about the throttle, because you are controlling your speed with subtle feathering of the clutch while the friction zone eliminates the touchiness of the throttle.

You just have to experiment with steadiness on the controls (clutch and throttle) while you move the bars, and find what works for you.
@PilotAlan has a good tip about the thumb. Works for some.
 

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Also if there is anyone in the Chicago area working on these techniques as well, would love to team up
I am not currently working on the Ride Like a Pro maneuvers (even though I just received them on a thumb drive from his team yesterday), but I have been working on a number of things in a number of parking lots around the Naperville area that I have gotten pretty good results with.

What particular things are you needing to improve on?
 

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Discussion Starter #17
Everyone’s responses have been very helpful. I realized with the cone weave that keeping your head straight up and not even for a second looking at the cones helps with everything.
My throttle issues seem to be related to that. I look down and then I have to crank the bars hard to get around it which causes me to loose control of the throttle. Its amazing, when I look up, cones spaced 12 feet apart s is m way more roomy.

Here is my left leg by the way, gonna go back to the stock and I just ordered some Pepsx pucks. I’m at the point where I like hitting the pegs.




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