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Anybody use it? Good or bad reviews?

Thanks
 

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Anybody use it? Good or bad reviews?

Thanks
I have no good reviews. Every time It has been put in my tires were not balanced. I had it removed had dealer put on weights and perfect balance.
I will say that when I had it on one set I took a nail and lost minimal air.
Wish it would not have made the bike shake.
T
 

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Works good on my lawn mower tires......

I've seen it demonstrated several times, on tubes and tubeless tires, on motorcycle. Guy rode over a plank of wood with about 20 3" nails in it several times. He had about 60 punctures and lost about 10psi.

The stuff will seal, but it's on really for emergency use.

My only concerns, if you get a puncture and it seals, as a temporary fix, will you inspect you tires on a regular basis to check for these possible punctures.
 

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I have used Ride On in my last 2 sets of Bridgestone tires. I like the product and it has balanced very well. No lead weights or bouncy tires. I also have not had any flats with the product. Previously, I had to replace at least one tire on each new set before the expected life of the tire. Always the rear. I will use it again. Dealer charges $20 for Ride On when I get a new set.
B.
 

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ride-on does work as advertised. Advantages is it will seal some decent sized punctures. It will act as a dynamic tire balancer.

Disadvantages. Some tire places will not work on a tire that has that stuff in the tire. Can make a mess when changing a tire. Cannot easily patch a tire if necessary (real bear to get the surface totally clean for the patch). Takes a while of driving down the road before the slime rotates completely around the tire for a balancing effect, more so when cold. Cannot use dynabeads (which you sort of don't need if using the ride-on). False sense of security. Can get blow-out of the valve stem of the sealant when checking air pressure (just a bit of an unexpected mess, nothing serious). Have to clean the rim out when changing tires, another unnecessary pain.

If you're really concerned about unplanned air loss, get a tpms and use an alternative tire. Carry an air compressor and plugs in your onboard tool kit, and if really concerned a can of fix-a-flat. Note, some garages again won't work on a tire that has used fix-a-flat for the same reasons as above.

I don't use ride-on, and haven't felt the need to. I do use a tpms and have an alternative tire though, and the tool kit items (without the fix-a-flat).
 

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Ride On tire sealant

The last time I replaced my front tire I asked to have magic mystery beads installed instead of conventional balancing. The shop I had install the tire recommends Ride On and did not have any magic mystery beads in stock. I know the owner and he uses it in his bike.
I decided to give it a try and so far I am sold on the product. My bike is as smooth as it has ever been.
I have no regrets at all. YMMV.
 

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I used it on my 2007, before I had TPMS. It did a great job of balancing the wheels, but I question its ability to actually seal a puncture like the demo shows. Never had to put that part to the test.
 

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I used Ride-On in bikes with tubes, as they can't be plugged. Never had the opportunity to test it, as I never hit a nail after that with those bikes. Of course with a tube you don't have the mess when you change tires, either.

I did have a flat a couple of thousand miles from home and several hundred miles from any BMW dealership. A screw was stuck all the way in, and by the time I did my daily inspection the next day, the head was worn to the point where it couldn't be screwed out: had to be pulled. That's not good. I had a Dynaplug kit and a Cyclepump compressor on board. Saved my butt big time. I rode that plugged tire across 1500 miles of desert and mountains before it was convenient to change it. Never lost any air or had the slightest problem with it. I had the dealership in Colorado send the plugged tire home, and when a change was due, put it back on. Ran it till it was worn out with no issue. It was the rear - wouldn't do that with a front personally.
 

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The best repair IMHO is a sticky rope plug installed with glue.
 

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makes a mess, used it once, that's it for me..
I dbl what Fred H. has said..
 

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Ride On

I sold Ride On for about 4 yrs and can attest to the balance and run flat features. The claim that it will not damage your rims however I felt was false. After my 4th set of tires with Ride On in them my rims developed rust along the outer edges. I have since quit selling it, bought a run flat car tire for the rear tire and installed counter act beads in them. I now carry it as a "spare" like fix a flat to use on bikes I ride with should they get a flat. A vast majority of the flats you get will be on the rear tire so that is why I went to a run flat car tire.
 

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Ride On and all the comments. Kinda like modulators, ABS, and heel/toe shift. Many tales, many fables and little truth. :twisted:

I used it for awhile, just about everything that comes around I just have to play with it, curiosity of the cat kind of thing.

I find those photos of corroded rims quite interesting, but would have to conclude that many products on the market such as SLIME are used and then called Ride On. I would conclude that many tales are told that have an element of truth, but are not truthful about the product Ride On.

My experience with Ride On was OK, but I saw no real value to it over a three year time period and consequently stopped using it.

The product arrives in a little cardboard shipping box and you actually need three bottles of the stuff to treat both tires. Even using the recommended amount this still has much to be desired as I will note. This stuff is expensive also, tis not cheap.

So I trotted out to the garage to put this stuff in the tires. Well the product is very viscous and stiff, it does not flow well at all . After squeezing and struggling to get it to flow into the tires I decided to put the bottles in hot water and warm it up a bit. This helped somewhat but this product has little bits of cut fiberglass or something in it and helps to hold the product together, but it is really a pain to get through that valve stem. (naturally you do remove the stem core) So you squeeze and struggle and finally you get the two bottle plus the additional ounces from the third bottle in there. It is a struggle though.

Then you take the bike for a short ride as per instructions to distribute the product in the tire.

Now the first time you do replace a tire this is what you find.

The product in the amount recommended due to the spinning force of the wheels and tires all travels to the inside outside tread area of the tire, however the product coats only about a two inch center strip of the tire. If you were to get a puncture outside of the exact round radius of the center tread, beyond about a two inch center strip it would do you no good at all. So much of the outside area of the tread and the radius curve of the tread is not even coated. Only the very center of the tire is coated. In summary two thirds of the road tread is not protected.

You will find none of the product on the rim, and it is too stiff and viscous to drip down on the rim, and stays put on the center part of the tire tread. Again, you will not find a single drop of it on the wheel rim it is always stuck on the center tread part of the tire. No mess changing a tire, none at all, the stuff is all set on the center ridge of the tire tread.

Now here is the bad news. This relates to a sheetrock screw. Yep there it was dead center of the tire with the head ground off. The tire was not leaking, but sometimes a screw will seal anyway until you pull it out with pliers. But when you do pull the screw with needle nose pliers some of the product now gets on the punctured part of the tire. Now when you dip your rope plug in rubber cement and shove it in there the cement will not bond with the tire. So that is the deal. You have to remove the screw, nail whatever it is and cannot rely on this product to long term seal the tire. So now you have the situation of trying to plug the tire and due to the product making a mess in the puncture the plug will not bond to the tire.

So now you need a new tire, whereas is you had not had this stuff in there, a rope plug and rubber cement would have saved the day.

So although I saw no rim damage in three years, I was never impressed with the way the product coated only the two inch center strip of the tire tread. When you do get a puncture that is within this coated strip then a rope plug will not bond with the tire, and you end up installing a new tire.

It is or was a product of that time, then we had magic beads, now we have centramatics. Time moves forward, things improve, and the best thing today is an alternative tire, a TPMS, and centramatics. Also a few rope plugs and a small compressor carried in the bike.

Do not forget to renew that rubber cement, a brand new tube of it never opened simply evaporates or vanishes, the tube a couple years old will be empty.

So ride on is a feel good thing, that actually causes you to have to buy a new tire if you do get a puncture in the part of the tire the product does coat.
 

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I know that it made a mess on my tire changer when the owner failed to say it was in the tire.
 

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Have not used ride on but have used a couple other brands of tire sealant and for very slow leaks the stuff worked great, as far a causing a mess that was never an issue, the stuff I used washed off very easily with plain water, never damaged the rim at all as far as I could tell but whenever I used it the stuff was only in the tire for a couple months, one of my brothers had sealant in rear tire for a couple years and when I removed the tire the sealant was kind of stuck to the rim so it took a little extra work to wash it off but it didn't seem to have caused serious damage, if I ever have another slow leaker I will likely use sealant again but as far as just putting it in a new tire with hopes of preventing a flat nope I won't do that :thumbup:
 

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I don't care what the Ride On people say, that stuff is bad news! It will cause corrosion on your aluminum rims, it can and will cause leaks when it dries up around your tire valve, makes other forms of emergency tire repairs useless, and it pisses off most shops when it's time for new shoes!! Forget that crap and get one of the many tubeless repair kits and a small compressor.
 

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ride-on does work as advertised. Advantages is it will seal some decent sized punctures. It will act as a dynamic tire balancer.

Disadvantages. Some tire places will not work on a tire that has that stuff in the tire. Can make a mess when changing a tire. Cannot easily patch a tire if necessary (real bear to get the surface totally clean for the patch). Takes a while of driving down the road before the slime rotates completely around the tire for a balancing effect, more so when cold. Cannot use dynabeads (which you sort of don't need if using the ride-on). False sense of security. Can get blow-out of the valve stem of the sealant when checking air pressure (just a bit of an unexpected mess, nothing serious). Have to clean the rim out when changing tires, another unnecessary pain.

If you're really concerned about unplanned air loss, get a tpms and use an alternative tire. Carry an air compressor and plugs in your onboard tool kit, and if really concerned a can of fix-a-flat. Note, some garages again won't work on a tire that has used fix-a-flat for the same reasons as above.

I don't use ride-on, and haven't felt the need to. I do use a tpms and have an alternative tire though, and the tool kit items (without the fix-a-flat).
"Alternative tire" - I like that phrase. I take it you had difficulty finding a ride-flat tire that was made specifically for a motorcycle (hint hint).
 

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"Alternative tire" - I like that phrase. I take it you had difficulty finding a ride-flat tire that was made specifically for a motorcycle (hint hint).
:twisted: :lol:
 

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Discussion Starter #19
Well after reading all the posts I decided to pass on the tire sealent.

Anyways picked the tires up this week, first time with Bridgestones so we will see how they are.
 
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