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When I tour, especially in the west, temperatures can change drastically in a relatively short period of time from the very cold mountain elevations to the very hot valleys and deserts – nothing you guys don’t already know. Historically, I have had to carry two complete sets of gear; mesh jacket/pants and heavy Fieldsheer jacket/pants with pant liner and heated jacket liner.
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I guess I was looking for ideas that would allow me to use one set of outerwear while only needing to change the internal liners.<...>
Yep. Welcome to 'compromise'. :cool:

So, here's the real problem you'll have.

You started the day with those liners in both pants and jacket, and you experience that 40 or 50 degree temp shift in a morning of riding. You're now at a point that you'd really like to rid yourself of the liners.

Well, the jacket liner? That's easy. Zip, snap and it's out. If you wore a long-sleeve shirt, or even a heated jacket liner - easily removed and stored.

What about the pants liner? Some may be easily removed, but others? You're removing those pants someplace in order to remove that liner. 😲

[I'm referring to riding pants that have an removeable liner, mainly used for wet, but could be used for cold abatement.]

I will only carry one set of gear, and that's on my person. I have accessories to that which is either in use or stowed, along with my wife's set of gear & accessories and off-bike clothing for a few days.

There's a lot of other threads on this subject (as seen thru the 'Recommended Reading' links when this thread is viewed on a computer) and you're just in the same spot as nearly all riders are at some point in their riding time.
 

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Discussion Starter #22
What about the pants liner? Some may be easily removed, but others? You're removing those pants someplace in order to remove that liner. 😲
Have done exactly this and not always in the most private of locations. Usually hiding behind my bike and as quickly as possible. Fortunately, I wear LD Riding Shorts so it's not too bad. It's one of my primary issues though.
 

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Interesting 'problem.'

I toured last week into south central British Columbia wearing thin, mositure-wicking longjohns under Klim ventilated riding pants.

Temperatures dipped down to a frigid 3 degrees Celsius in the mountain passes and later in the day climbed to a hot for us Canadians twenty nine degrees Celsius. I was warm, but comfortable enough without removing my longjohns by opening the front and rear vents of the Klim pants. Of course, everyone has a different comfort range for ambient temperature.

Edit: To me there's little difference in stripping down to LD riding shorts in public than there is to stripping down to swim trunks.

Tim
 

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Firstly I own the following motorcycle pants.

One pair Olympia mesh pants

One pair Revit Sand Pants

Two pairs of Revit Jersey jeans

Two pairs of Klim Latitude Misano pants in both black and light grey

One pair of Rukka ROR pants

And One pair of Scorpian Seattle overpants

If I were to recommend a pair of all around pants to a non gear junky like myself it would be the Scorpian Seattle pants. Just check out the video on Revzilla. For reference I'm 6 ft and weigh 150 pounds with a 34 inseam and I have a pair in size large. If you look at Hi Viz Brian he is wearing a large but he is bursting out of those pants. One caveat is they come ready for tailoring if they are too long. They fit my 34 inseam out of the box.. Also, if they are too long there is a string that tightens them up around your boot. Also, check out all those waterproof pockets. And did I mention the price?

Check them out!

 

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Besides the issue of being comfortable in varied weather, IMHO the most important issue is protection in the unlikely but realistic event of an accident. After doing much research I ultimately chose Motoport Kevlar blended riding gear. With a bit of layering over and under the Motoport gear I can be comfortable to ride in just about any weather a reasonable person would consider safe for riding a motorcycle.
 

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As others have said, you won’t get a consensus. You will get a LOT of opinions. I’m the guy who started the “Dressing for success” thread, and I’ll add a few more of my opinions here. There have already been a lot of excellent opinions posted, so this may be redundant.

My standard riding gear is suitable for all four seasons, with a few additions for extremes. I wear MotoPort stretch Kevlar, but for this conversation of comfort any heavy textile riding suit will work. For example, if I hadn’t got a good deal on MotoPort, I would still be wearing my First Gear Kilimanjaro jacket for year-round use. The brand becomes very important for safety, and that’s why I prefer MotoPort.

Wear a base layer of wicking fabric such as LD Comfort shorts and t-shirt year-round. On top of that goes your heavy textile jacket, pants, waterproof boots, and gloves. You’re all set for everything but cold rain and extreme cold. I’ve done iron-butt rides through West Texas in 114º F. heat with the full MotoPort gear.

I do not use any liners that would require undressing to zip in a liner. The exception is that I will wear a Gerbing heated jacket liner under my MotoPort jacket if it is too cold without the electrics. I found that if I can keep my core and hands warm I just don’t need the electric pants. If I were to ride for hours in 30º F. weather I might change my mind.

Summer rain doesn’t bother me, for my suit does not absorb water and will quickly dry when the rain stops. If the rain makes me cold however, it is time to put the rain suit (I use Frog Toggs) OVER my riding suit. The gore-tex fabrics have the advantage here over my MotoPort stretch Kevlar, for apparently with gore-tex one doesn’t need any rain gear.
 

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Discussion Starter #27
Glockjock,
Yes, I was aware you authored that post and I have read through it several times. Thank You! I'm liking this Klim gear (jackets mostly). I like the pants also just wish they were an over-pant style. For me, having an ankle-to-hip zipper just makes life easier. I'm using information from those like yourself that have used the gear and searching for what I think will work best for my needs. I sincerely appreciate all the contributions.
 

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I live on the left coast, where we are currently in the middle of another week of 100*+ temps (108 today, and 121 on my back porch). My year round riding gear is MotoPort - mesh Kevlar jacket and stretch Kevlar pants. I almost always carry the jacket liner with me. When the weather begins to change, or if I am headed out of my local, local riding area, I throw in the heated jacket, gloves, and socks. That will keep me comfortable down to temps where the likely hood of ice and snow are more than a theoretical possibility. The Baker hand wings keep the cold air off my hands so that the grip warmers and/or heated gloves keep my hands warm enough.

I ride with that gear as over gear in this silly heat as well - I wear jeans under the Kevlar pants. If I know it's going to be 100*+ for several days on the road, I may change to a light weight casual pants or shorts (you do not want to see me in shorts and riding boots - trust me on that). I'm fine with the heat, while others are not.

The MotoPort gear was built to spec, and I expect will last me 10-15 years, easily. I just hope I'm still riding pushing 90.

Just another data point. YMMV

jdg
 

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Glockjock,
Yes, I was aware you authored that post and I have read through it several times. Thank You! I'm liking this Klim gear (jackets mostly). I like the pants also just wish they were an over-pant style. For me, having an ankle-to-hip zipper just makes life easier. I'm using information from those like yourself that have used the gear and searching for what I think will work best for my needs. I sincerely appreciate all the contributions.

Here you go. Firstgear Jaunt Overpants. They appear to open from ankle to hip as most overpants do. Typical of Firstgear, they're reasonably priced.

Tim
 
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